Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

How do I perform a null-check on a dynamic object?

Pseudo code:

public void Main() {
    dynamic dynamicObject = 33;
    if(true) { // Arbitrary logic
        dynamicObject = null;
    }
    Method(dynamicObject);
}

public void Method(dynamic param) {
    // TODO: check if the content of 'param' is equal to null
}
share|improve this question
up vote 21 down vote accepted

Are you worried about the possibility the dynamic object will have a custom equality operator that will change the way the null is interpreted? If so just use Object.ReferenceEquals

if (Object.ReferenceEquals(null, param)) {
  .......
}
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 Sure. You can lose the Object., though – Ani Aug 11 '11 at 16:47
    
@Ani not sure what' your getting at there. – JaredPar Aug 11 '11 at 16:51
    
You could just write ReferenceEquals(null, param). I can't believe from the ~5 questions on this topic at SO didn't solve it this simply. – Seb Nilsson Aug 11 '11 at 16:53
    
@JaredPar: Since all C# types that can contain method definitions extend System.Object (AFAIK), it isn't necessary to qualify. (Not all that important really.) – Ani Aug 11 '11 at 16:53
1  
@Ani definitely. For me that borders on being evil and virtually every code sample can be defeated by someone being evil. – JaredPar Aug 11 '11 at 17:04

You can always just make the param of type object, that's what the compiler is doing. When you type a parameter dynamic it just means within that method only it is using dynamic invoke for all uses of param, but outside it's just a signature of type object. A more powerful usage of your dynamicObject would be to have overloads of the method you are calling, so if you keep your example the same and just have two overloads it would call one of the two methods based on the runtime type, and you can always add more for more types.

public void Main() {
    dynamic dynamicObject = 33;
    if(true) { // Arbitrary logic
        dynamicObject = null;
    }
    Method(dynamicObject);
}
public void Method(int param) {
  //don't have to check check null
  //only called if dynamicObject is an int
}
public void Method(object param) {
// will be called if dynamicObject is not an int or null
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.