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I have a custom TextBox control. I am trying to bind it to a simple Description string property of an object. How can I get the binding to work? The same binding works fine if I change this to a TextBox.

<Style x:Key="{x:Type TaskDash:TextBoxWithDescription}" TargetType="{x:Type TaskDash:TextBoxWithDescription}">
            <Setter Property="Template">
                <Setter.Value>
                    <ControlTemplate TargetType="{x:Type TaskDash:TextBoxWithDescription}">

                        <TextBox>
                        </TextBox>

                    </ControlTemplate>
                </Setter.Value>
            </Setter>
        </Style>
public class TextBoxWithDescription : TextBox
{
    public TextBoxWithDescription()
    {
        LabelText = String.Empty;
    }

    public string LabelText { get; set; }

    public override void OnApplyTemplate()
    {
        base.OnApplyTemplate();

        var textBlock = (TextBlock)this.Template.FindName("LabelText", this);
        if (textBlock != null) textBlock.Text = this.LabelText;
    }
}
<TaskDash:TextBoxWithDescription Grid.Row="0" Grid.Column="0"
        x:Name="textBoxDescription" 
        Text="{Binding Description, BindsDirectlyToSource=True}" LabelText="Description">
    </TaskDash:TextBoxWithDescription>
public partial class EditTaskItem : Window
{
    private TaskItem _taskItem;

    public EditTaskItem(TaskItem taskItem)
    {
        InitializeComponent();

        this.DataContext = taskItem;
        textBoxDescription.DataContext = taskItem;
        _taskItem = taskItem;
    }
}
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2 Answers 2

Ok ... there are a couple of things wrong with your code. Lets begin with your style for your custom control. You need to add a static constructor which allows restyling your new control. Like this

    static TextBoxWithDescription ()
    {
        DefaultStyleKeyProperty.OverrideMetadata(typeof(TextBoxWithDescription ), new FrameworkPropertyMetadata(typeof(TextBoxWithDescription )));
    }

This tells WPF "Hey, please look for a Style for this control".

Now you can remove the x:Key="{x:Type TaskDash:TextBoxWithDescription}"because this is going to be your default style.

Next thing is. In WPF one thing to understand is, that every control has absolutely no UI content, unless it gets an Template. You already have a Template in your Style, but the only visual content it gets is an empty TextBox. This is strange, because you derive your TextBoxWithDescription from TextBox. So what you create is a a control derived from textbox, containing a textbox. See this to see how a TextBox Template looks in WPF 4.0.

Back to your empty TextBox in your ControlTemplate. Remember that i said, your controls, without a style are completely invisible, its only logic. The only visible thing is the TextBox in your Template. To make it work somehow, you need to pass some properties to this TextBox. The control says how and the template takes the properties and puts them in use. You can do this via TemplateBinding For example. If your control has a Property Background, this property does nothing you can set it as long as you want, but a ControlTemplate can give some meaning to it. So for example add a Rectangle in your ControlTemplate and set the Fill Property to {TemplateBinding Background}. Which basicaly tells the Rectangle "Your property Fill is going to be the value of Background from the control we are currently templating". I hope this makes it clear.

Next thing: You overrid OnApplyTemplate you usually do this to find a control in your ControlTemplate by name. It seems you mixed this with one of your properties. To Find a control in your Template via FindName, you need to give it a name

Like this

<Setter Property="Template">
                <Setter.Value>
                    <ControlTemplate TargetType="{x:Type TaskDash:TextBoxWithDescription}">

                        <TextBox x:Name="PART_MyTextBox">
                        </TextBox>

                    </ControlTemplate>
                </Setter.Value>
            </Setter>

and modify your OnApplyTemplate to

var textBlock = (TextBlock)this.Template.FindName("PART_MyTextBox", this);

Now you have the textblock in your current ControlTemplate.

The last mistake i can see is. You set in OnApplyTemplatethe TextBox Text to your LabelText. While this works, one time, it is not very nice and usually not the WPF way. Also if you modify the LabelText property, it will not be displayed, because you would have to set it again. Change your LabelText to a dependency property Now you can use the already mentioned TemplateBinding to set this text, directly on your control template TextBox.

                        <TextBox x:Name="PART_MyTextBox" Text="{TemplateBinding LabelText}>
                        </TextBox>

This will also make sure that changes to your Control property, will also update the Text on this TextBox.

One last thing

this.DataContext = taskItem;
        // textBoxDescription.DataContext = taskItem;
        _taskItem = taskItem;

If your textboxdescription is going to be a parent of your window, you don't need to set the DataContext explicitly, because it will be inherited down the hierachy. As long as an Element don't change the DataContext, it will be always the DataContext of the parent.

I would suggest you read more on the basics of WPF, i know it has a steep learning curve, but its worth the effort. It is difficult if someone comes from a WinForms background to get the head wrapped around all the different new design philosophies and different ways to do things.

Hope that helps a bit

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Thanks for the detailed feedback. I'll try changing the template later today. What you said about the template TextBox makes sense...I previously had Rectangle or Border or something in there instead of TextBox. I think the control was actually working then, but I ran into some other issue and decided to change to TextBox. –  Shawn Aug 11 '11 at 18:37

@dowhilefor - great answer. I write this as an answer only because it's going to be too long for a comment.

@Shawn - it seems like you are trying to make a Label-Field control. If that's the case, try this template:

<ControlTemplate TargetType="{x:Type TaskDash:TextBoxWithDescription}">
    <Grid>
        <Grid.ColumnDefinitions>
            <!--The SharedSizeGroup property will allow us to align all text boxes to the same vertical line-->
            <ColumnDefinition Width="Auto" 
                              SharedSizeGroup="LabelColumn"/>
            <!--This column acts as a margin between the label and the text box-->
            <ColumnDefinition Width="5"/>
            <ColumnDefinition />
        </Grid.ColumnDefinitions>
        <TextBlock Text="{TemplateBinding LabelText}"
                   VerticalAlignment="Center"/>
        <Border Grid.Column="2"
                Background="{TemplateBinding Background}"
                BorderBrush="{TemplateBinding BorderBrush}"
                BorderThickness="{TemplateBinding BorderThickness}">
            <ScrollViewer x:Name="PART_ContentHost"
                          Padding="{TemplateBinding Padding}"/>
        </Border>
    </Grid>
</ControlTemplate>

And remove the override for OnApplyTemplate.

If the control is a part of a (often called) "PropertyGrid" and you have multiple instances of the TextBoxWithDescription control in the same panel, define Grid.IsSharedSizeScope on that panel (it doesn't have to be Grid panel). This will align the text boxes to a uniform vertical line.

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