Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Sample.h

namespace Testing
{
    enum Type
    {
        DATA = 0,
        MORE_DATA
    };
}

Now in Sample2.h, using the same namespace, can I access the DataType defined in Sample.h, without including it?

namespace Testing
{
    Type test;
}

The question has come up, because I have files that implement this, and seem to build with no problem. Another user is trying to build, but reports that he has to #include "Sample.h" in Sample2.h in order to build.

share|improve this question
    
Why don't you try it yourself first? Such questions need to be closed immediately. –  Nawaz Aug 11 '11 at 17:06
    
Why don't you ask "another user" to cross check your environment and his/her environment in order to resolve this issue? –  bayCoder Aug 11 '11 at 17:09
    
I have tried it, and it compiles for me successfully. –  Adam Johnson Aug 11 '11 at 17:09
2  
@Nawaz: Why? Most of the C++ gurus on here seem to be of the opinion that trying it on your compiler is not a sufficient means to a definitive answer in C++, because compilers don't always conform 100% to the standard. –  Benjamin Lindley Aug 11 '11 at 17:10
1  
@Adam Johnson It works for you because whatever source file uses the enum probably includes Sample.h before including Sample2.h. Try commenting out all #include "Sample.h" directives from your code and see if it builds then. –  Praetorian Aug 11 '11 at 17:11
add comment

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Yes, you will need to include Sample.h within Sample2.h. The definition of Type is not visible to the compiler within Sample2.h simply because the namespace name is the same within the 2 files.

The only thing you gain by having the same namespace names in the 2 files is that Type does not need to have its namespace stated explicitly in Sample2.h. For instance, if the 2 namespaces were not the same:

Sample.h

namespace Testing
{
    enum Type
    {
        DATA = 0,
        MORE_DATA
    };
}

Sample2.h

#include "Sample.h"

namespace Testing1
{
    Testing::Type test;
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Most likely the files build because some earlier include file is including Sample.h for you. When the earlier include file is omitted (or moved after Sample2.h) the files will no longer compile.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Forward enum declarations are not supported in most current compilers. It is a planned feature of up coming C++0x. You can create pointers to Type probably, but cannot instantiate, this is compatible with other types (structs and classes) as well.

Ow, my bad, I saw it wrong i guess. Anyway, read the others and read this as well. Headers are not compiled stand alone. Therefore, if you don't include a required heading in your header and included that in the cpp file you will not run into any errors. As long as all the cpp files contain both headers with the required order there will be no problems at all. However, this is not a good idea, it is best to include any necessary files within your header and use header guards to ensure they are not added twice. I hope this makes sense.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.