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I've found that

mov al, bl
mov ah, bh

is much faster than

mov ax, bx

Can anyone explain me why? I'm running on Core 2 Duo 3 Ghz, in 32-bit mode under Windows XP. Compiling using NASM and then linking with VS2010. Nasm compile command:

nasm -f coff -o triangle.o triangle.asm

Here is the main loop I'm using to render a triangle:

; some variables on stack
%define cr  DWORD [ebp-20]
%define dcr DWORD [ebp-24]
%define dcg DWORD [ebp-32]
%define dcb DWORD [ebp-40]

loop:

add esi, dcg
mov eax, esi
shr eax, 8

add edi, dcb
mov ebx, edi
shr ebx, 16
mov bh, ah

mov eax, cr
add eax, dcr
mov cr, eax

mov ah, bh  ; faster
mov al, bl
;mov ax, bx

mov DWORD [edx], eax

add edx, 4

dec ecx
jge loop

I can provide whole VS project with sources for testing.

share|improve this question
2  
This certainly does not make any sense at all. you have two instructions to decode and execute instead of one. Could this be affected by other things, like the size of the loop? How much is "much faster"? How reproducible is it? –  Nathan Fellman Aug 11 '11 at 19:45
    
I'm guessing here, but could it be because there's already usage of 8-bit partial registers mov bh, ah? I think it might be the case that a version using only 32-bit registers might be faster than either of the presented versions. –  user786653 Aug 12 '11 at 8:33
1  
@NathanFellman, using 16-bit operands in 32 bits code forces a context switch, it is the source of the slowdown, not the single instruction. –  Johan Oct 3 '11 at 16:54
    
@Johan: the CPU certainly does not force a context switch, and the OS shouldn't care about this. Who would force such a context switch? –  Nathan Fellman Oct 3 '11 at 20:47
1  
@NathanFellman, you are talking about a very different context switch than I am. I don't know where and how the OS enters into this, or protected mode, or virtual x86 mode. It's just a simple context switch in how the CPU deals with register renaming and the pipeline (all of which differs with the version of the CPU). –  Johan Oct 3 '11 at 21:14

3 Answers 3

Why is it slow
The reason using 16 byte registers is expensive as opposed to using 8 byte sub-registers is that 16-bit registers force the processor to switch from 32-bit mode into 16-bit mode.

The switch to 16 bit mode forces a context switch between 32-bit and 16-bit addressing mode.

If you run mov ax,[bx] the processor instead runs mov ax,[ds:bx], That is it adds the contents of DS to bx, so that the processor can access 1 megabyte of memory instead of 64 kilobyte. In 32 bit mode you still have a segments registers, but it works very different.
The switch between the two operating modes eats a lot of time.

What has this addressing stuff got to do with me
Absolutely nothing, but when you force the x86 into 16-bit mode. The addressing module gets activated as well and this takes time.

How can I make it faster?

mov al, bl
mov ah, bh

(This code takes a minimum of 2 CPU-cycles and may give a stall on the second instruction because on some (older) x86 CPU's you get a lock on EAX)
Here's what happens:

  • EAX is read. (cycle 1)
    • The lower byte of EAX is changed (still cycle 1)
    • and the full value is written back into EAX. (cycle 1)
  • EAX is locked for writing until the first write is fully resolved. (potential wait for multiple cycles)
  • The process is repeated for the 2nd byte in EAX. (cycle 2)

This can take as much as 7 cycles on an older CPU, and both instructions cannot run in parallel because they access the same register. On the lastest Core2 CPU's this is not so much of a problem, because extra hardware has been put in place that knows that bl and bh really never get in each other's way.

mov eax, ebx

Which moves 4 bytes at a time, that single instruction will run in 1 cpu-cycle (and can be paired with other instructions in parallel).

  • If you want fast code, always use the 32-bit (EAX, EBX etc) registers.
  • Try to avoid using the 8 bit sub-registers, unless you have to.
  • Never use the 16-bit registers. Even if you have to use 5 instructions in 32-bit mode, that will still be faster.

Speeding up the code
I see a few opportunities to speed up the code.

; some variables on stack
%define cr  DWORD [ebp-20]
%define dcr DWORD [ebp-24]
%define dcg DWORD [ebp-32]
%define dcb DWORD [ebp-40]

mov edx,cr

loop:

add esi, dcg
mov eax, esi
shr eax, 8

add edi, dcb
mov ebx, edi
shr ebx, 16   ;higher 16 bytes in ebx will be empty.
mov bh, ah

;mov eax, cr   
;add eax, dcr
;mov cr, eax

add edx,dcr
mov eax,edx

and eax,0xFFFF0000  ; clear lower 16 bytes in EAX
or eax,ebx          ; merge the two. 
;mov ah, bh  ; faster
;mov al, bl


mov DWORD [epb+offset+ecx*4], eax ; requires storing the data in reverse order.

;add edx, 4

dec ecx


jge loop
share|improve this answer
1  
The use of segment registers is independent of whether the addressing is 16-bit or 32-bit. It depends only on whether the code is executing in protected mode or real mode. There is always a segment descriptor involved in a memory access, and that is independent of the data (or, for that matter, address) size. With 32-bit addressing the segments can be up to 4 GB in size, but they are still there. –  Henning Makholm Oct 3 '11 at 17:50
    
@HenningMakholm, yea, it's the context switch and the fact that although both use segments they have very different contexts and ways of operating that eats up the time. Reworded the answer. –  Johan Oct 3 '11 at 17:55
1  
The addressing mode controls how an instruction that contains an address computes the offset within a segment. How this offset is used is completely independent of the address size; it will be compared to the segment limit and added to the base address in exactly the same way. And no context switch is involved. –  Henning Makholm Oct 3 '11 at 17:58
1  
Segment registers are exactly the same in 32-bit and 16-bit protected mode. They work differently in real mode , but that is neither here nor there. Working with 16 bit data does not force a switch to real mode (nor to virtual 8086 mode). –  Henning Makholm Oct 3 '11 at 18:04
1  
Johan is right, this is the problem. NEVER use 16-bit operations, unless you switch fully into that mode and stay there for a long time before switching out again. Adding random 16-bit operations to your code will destroy performance. –  Tyler Durden Oct 29 '12 at 16:13

It is also faster on my Core 2 Duo CPU L9300 1.60GHz. As I wrote in a comment I think this is related to the use of partial registers (ah, al, ax). See more e.g. here, here and here (pg. 88).

I've written a small test suite to try and improve on the code, and while not using the ax version presented in the OP is the smartest, trying to eliminate partial register usage does improve on the speed (even more so than my quick attempt at freeing up another register).

To get more information on why one version is faster than another I think requires more careful reading of the source material and/or using something like Intel VTune or AMD CodeAnalyst. (It could turn out that I'm wrong)

UPDATE, while the below output from oprofile doesn't prove anything it does show that there are a lot of partial register stalls occurring in both versions, but roughly twice as many in the slowest version (triAsm2) as in the 'fast' version (triAsm1).

$ opreport -l test                            
CPU: Core 2, speed 1600 MHz (estimated)
Counted CPU_CLK_UNHALTED events (Clock cycles when not halted) with a unit mask of 0x00 (Unhalted core cycles) count 800500
Counted RAT_STALLS events (Partial register stall cycles) with a unit mask of 0x0f (All RAT) count 1000000
samples  %        samples  %        symbol name
21039    27.3767  10627    52.3885  triAsm2.loop
16125    20.9824  4815     23.7368  triC
14439    18.7885  4828     23.8008  triAsm1.loop
12557    16.3396  0              0  triAsm3.loop
12161    15.8243  8         0.0394  triAsm4.loop

Complete oprofile output.

Results:

triC: 7410.000000 ms, a5afb9 (C implementation of the asm code)

triAsm1: 6690.000000 ms, a5afb9 (Code from OP, using al and ah)

triAsm2: 9290.000000 ms, a5afb9 (Code from OP, using ax)

triAsm3: 5760.000000 ms, a5afb9 (Straight forward translation of OPs code to one without partial register usage)

triAsm4: 5640.000000 ms, a5afb9 (Quick attempt at making it faster)

Here is my test suite, compiled with -std=c99 -ggdb -m32 -O3 -march=native -mtune=native:

test.c:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdint.h>
#include <time.h>

extern void triC(uint32_t* dest, uint32_t cnt, uint32_t cr, uint32_t cg, uint32_t cb, uint32_t dcr, uint32_t dcg, uint32_t dcb);
extern void triAsm1(uint32_t* dest, uint32_t cnt, uint32_t cr, uint32_t cg, uint32_t cb, uint32_t dcr, uint32_t dcg, uint32_t dcb);
extern void triAsm2(uint32_t* dest, uint32_t cnt, uint32_t cr, uint32_t cg, uint32_t cb, uint32_t dcr, uint32_t dcg, uint32_t dcb);
extern void triAsm3(uint32_t* dest, uint32_t cnt, uint32_t cr, uint32_t cg, uint32_t cb, uint32_t dcr, uint32_t dcg, uint32_t dcb);
extern void triAsm4(uint32_t* dest, uint32_t cnt, uint32_t cr, uint32_t cg, uint32_t cb, uint32_t dcr, uint32_t dcg, uint32_t dcb);

uint32_t scanline[640];

#define test(tri) \
    {\
        clock_t start = clock();\
        srand(60);\
        for (int i = 0; i < 5000000; i++) {\
            tri(scanline, rand() % 640, 10<<16, 20<<16, 30<<16, 1<<14, 1<<14, 1<<14);\
        }\
        printf(#tri ": %f ms, %x\n",(clock()-start)*1000.0/CLOCKS_PER_SEC,scanline[620]);\
    }

int main() {
    test(triC);
    test(triAsm1);
    test(triAsm2);
    test(triAsm3);
    test(triAsm4);
    return 0;
}

tri.c:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdint.h>

void triC(uint32_t* dest, uint32_t cnt, uint32_t cr, uint32_t cg, uint32_t cb, uint32_t dcr, uint32_t dcg, uint32_t dcb) {
    while (cnt--) {
        cr += dcr;
        cg += dcg;
        cb += dcb;
        *dest++ = (cr & 0xffff0000) | ((cg >> 8) & 0xff00) | ((cb >> 16) & 0xff);
    }
}

atri.asm:

    bits 32
    section .text
    global triAsm1
    global triAsm2
    global triAsm3
    global triAsm4

%define cr DWORD [ebp+0x10]
%define dcr DWORD [ebp+0x1c]
%define dcg DWORD [ebp+0x20]
%define dcb DWORD [ebp+0x24]

triAsm1:
    push ebp
    mov ebp, esp

    pusha

    mov edx, [ebp+0x08] ; dest
    mov ecx, [ebp+0x0c] ; cnt
    mov esi, [ebp+0x14] ; cg
    mov edi, [ebp+0x18] ; cb

.loop:

    add esi, dcg
    mov eax, esi
    shr eax, 8

    add edi, dcb
    mov ebx, edi
    shr ebx, 16
    mov bh, ah

    mov eax, cr
    add eax, dcr
    mov cr, eax

    mov ah, bh  ; faster
    mov al, bl

    mov DWORD [edx], eax

    add edx, 4

    dec ecx
    jge .loop

    popa

    pop ebp
    ret


triAsm2:
    push ebp
    mov ebp, esp

    pusha

    mov edx, [ebp+0x08] ; dest
    mov ecx, [ebp+0x0c] ; cnt
    mov esi, [ebp+0x14] ; cg
    mov edi, [ebp+0x18] ; cb

.loop:

    add esi, dcg
    mov eax, esi
    shr eax, 8

    add edi, dcb
    mov ebx, edi
    shr ebx, 16
    mov bh, ah

    mov eax, cr
    add eax, dcr
    mov cr, eax

    mov ax, bx ; slower

    mov DWORD [edx], eax

    add edx, 4

    dec ecx
    jge .loop

    popa

    pop ebp
    ret

triAsm3:
    push ebp
    mov ebp, esp

    pusha

    mov edx, [ebp+0x08] ; dest
    mov ecx, [ebp+0x0c] ; cnt
    mov esi, [ebp+0x14] ; cg
    mov edi, [ebp+0x18] ; cb

.loop:
    mov eax, cr
    add eax, dcr
    mov cr, eax

    and eax, 0xffff0000

    add esi, dcg
    mov ebx, esi
    shr ebx, 8
    and ebx, 0x0000ff00
    or eax, ebx

    add edi, dcb
    mov ebx, edi
    shr ebx, 16
    and ebx, 0x000000ff
    or eax, ebx

    mov DWORD [edx], eax

    add edx, 4

    dec ecx
    jge .loop

    popa

    pop ebp
    ret

triAsm4:
    push ebp
    mov ebp, esp

    pusha

    mov [stackptr], esp

    mov edi, [ebp+0x08] ; dest
    mov ecx, [ebp+0x0c] ; cnt
    mov edx, [ebp+0x10] ; cr
    mov esi, [ebp+0x14] ; cg
    mov esp, [ebp+0x18] ; cb

.loop:
    add edx, dcr
    add esi, dcg
    add esp, dcb

    ;*dest++ = (cr & 0xffff0000) | ((cg >> 8) & 0xff00) | ((cb >> 16) & 0xff);
    mov eax, edx ; eax=cr
    and eax, 0xffff0000

    mov ebx, esi ; ebx=cg
    shr ebx, 8
    and ebx, 0xff00
    or eax, ebx
    ;mov ah, bh

    mov ebx, esp
    shr ebx, 16
    and ebx, 0xff
    or eax, ebx
    ;mov al, bl

    mov DWORD [edi], eax
    add edi, 4

    dec ecx
    jge .loop

    mov esp, [stackptr]

    popa

    pop ebp
    ret

    section .data
stackptr: dd 0
share|improve this answer
    
What is this opreport that you used to measure performance here? Where can I find informationt on it? –  Nathan Fellman Aug 13 '11 at 8:11
    
@Nathan Fellman: It's part of oprofile. –  user786653 Aug 13 '11 at 9:25
    
+1 for the whole analysis –  BlackBear Oct 3 '11 at 18:02

In 32-bit code, mov ax, bx needs an operand-size prefix, whereas byte-sized moves don't. Apparently modern processor designers do not spend much effort at getting the operand-size prefix to decode quickly, though it surprises me that the penalty would be enough to do two byte-sized moves instead.

share|improve this answer
2  
I doubt that the addition of the 66 prefix caused this. It's more "expensive" to decode two 2-byte instructions than one 3-byte instruction. –  Nathan Fellman Aug 11 '11 at 19:36
    
Well, for all I know -- speaking from relatively blissful ignorance -- 66h might decode via a trap to microcode, and that would certainly be slower. With the exception of memory stores (which could well need special-casing in the decoder logic anyway), I don't think compiled code would have much occasion to include 16-bit instructions. –  Henning Makholm Aug 11 '11 at 19:51
13  
I speak from expertise (I'm a validation engineer at Intel, and I worked on the Core Duo and Core 2 Duo projects), and I can tell you that 66h does not require any microcode assistance whatsoever. –  Nathan Fellman Aug 11 '11 at 20:15
2  
(bowing to authority) I got nothing, then. –  Henning Makholm Aug 11 '11 at 23:23

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