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I'm stuck with this : I need to merge two text files in a single tab delimited text file, on a batch script. ex :

file1:

qwer
tyui
asdf

file2:

1345
6876
8796

file3:

qwer    1345
tyui    6876
asdf    8796

All I need in fact, is a equivalent to Unix command : paste -d "\t" file1 file2 > file3

share|improve this question
    
What's your desired output? – Adam Matan Aug 11 '11 at 19:31
    
@Adam: The Unix paste command would produce the results he shows in file3. – Carey Gregory Aug 11 '11 at 19:38
    
exactly, I need the results show in file3 – user767990 Aug 11 '11 at 20:21
up vote 11 down vote accepted
 @echo off

 set f1=1.txt
 set f2=2.txt
 set "sep=  "  % tab %

 (
   for /f "delims=" %%a in (%f1%) do (
      setlocal enabledelayedexpansion
       set /p line=
       echo(%%a!sep!!line!
      endlocal
   )
 )<%f2%

pause
goto :eof
share|improve this answer
1  
HO man ! It working so well ! Thank you you're my life saver. Now I'm just trying to figure, how it's working. What is this enabledelayedexpansion local var ? and how the !sep! !line! working. – user767990 Aug 12 '11 at 13:45
1  
+5 :-), Absoulte impressive, I didn't know that set /p can read multiple lines from a file, and it seems to be really powerful as it can read every content without the delayed toggle technic. It's a long time ago that I see a complete new technic. – jeb Aug 12 '11 at 19:21
1  
@user767990 golly it's a funny one.. That % tab % is a comment.. there are no tabs outputted.. just a double space. setlocal enabledelayedexpansion ... endlocal is a bit of a story but the setlocal aspect isn't that relevant.. The enabledelayedexpansion aspect, actually just creates normal behaviour.. !sep! is like %sep% but so it works normally. You may wonder why the brackets don't match up.. echo( could be replaced with echo/ if you want. – barlop Aug 14 '11 at 7:52
    
@user767990 The clever bit is that this kind of thing works C:\>( set /p line= & set /p line= )<filename echo %line% and you get the second line, meaning set is reading each line of the file, each time it executes within those brackets. If you just did set /p line=<filename And you did that twice.. you'd only get the first line. – barlop Aug 14 '11 at 7:53
1  
@barlop: nice, but wrong :-) See the difference between @echo off setlocal DisableDelayedExpansion for %%a in ("Hello!") DO echo %%a setlocal EnableDelayedExpansion for %%a in ("Hello!") DO echo %%a and you can read How the parser works – jeb Aug 29 '11 at 8:23

The answer of walid2me is awesome, this is only a small mofication to show how to make it safe against characters like !^ in the file 1.txt, the content of file 2.txt is safe, a it is read with teh set/p syntax.

@echo off

 set f1=1.txt
 set f2=2.txt
 set "sep=  "  % tab %

 (
   setlocal DisableDelayedExpansion
   for /f "delims=" %%a in (%f1%) do (
      set "f1_line=%%a"
      setlocal EnableDelayedExpansion
       set /p f2_line=
       echo(!f1_line!!sep!!f2_line!
      endlocal
   )
   endlocal
 )<%f2%

pause
goto :eof

As you can see, I only move the expansion of %%a just before the setlocal EnableDelayedExpansion

There is still another small flaw, as set/p strips trailing control characters, like single CR, LF and also TAB.
This affects only the file 2.txt.

In depth analysis about set /p are at New technic: set /p can read multiple lines from a file

share|improve this answer
    
suppose it was cmd /v:on, would it be OK to put setlocal DisableDelayedExpansion before the for /f, and endlocal after set "f1_line=%%a" ? – barlop Nov 26 '11 at 21:14
    
No, then you have one endlocal per loop, but no further setlocal's, and you will destroy the f1_line variable with the endlocal. I edit the answer to be safe, even if DelayedExpansion was enabled – jeb Nov 26 '11 at 21:37

There's no native Windows command I know of that will do that, but there's a set of Unix tools for Windows here.

share|improve this answer
    
Scripting in batch make me seek :) You're I right cannot found a builtin tool to do the job. – user767990 Aug 11 '11 at 19:54

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