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I need to incrementally time some C code on a 32-bit Linux system. I am using the GNU clock() function for this. Here is the skeleton of my code with the relevant clock bits:

clock_t start, end;
double elapsed;

/* Init things */

start = clock();
while(terminationNotMet) { 

    /* Do some work. */

    end = clock();
    elapsed = ((double) (end - start)) / CLOCKS_PER_SEC;
    fprintf(fp,"%lf %d", elapsed, someResults);
}

Now the problem is that the clock_t is really just a long int and this code runs for quite awhile. The elapsed number of clock ticks returned by clock() eventually overflows and the resulting data is useless. Any thoughts on some workarounds or another method of timing CPU time? (Using wall clock time is not an option as these jobs are running niced on multiuser systems)

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Welcome to SO. I removed the GNU tag, as this is a standard C question. –  pmr Aug 11 '11 at 20:06

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Unfortunately this is a bug in glibc: clock_t is signed long rather than unsigned long, so it's impossible to use due to overflow. It should work to cast the values to unsigned long before subtracting them, but this is an ugly hack.

A better solution would be to use the modern clock_gettime function with the CLOCK_CPUTIME clock. This will give you nanosecond-resolution results instead of the poor resolution clock gives.

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Ah, good to know! Using clock_gettime is working just fine. For anyone else who happens to go this route, I had to add -l rt to gcc options to link clock_gettime. –  Flying Hawaiian Aug 11 '11 at 20:08

How about updating the start time on each iteration:

elapsed = 0.0;
start = clock();
while(terminationNotMet) { 

    /* Do some work. */

    end = clock();
    elapsed += ((double) (end - start)) / CLOCKS_PER_SEC;
    fprintf(fp,"%lf %d", elapsed, someResults);
    start = end;
}
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The problem is the actual value returned by clock() is overflowing the signed long (end). So, end is overflowing even before the subtraction occurs. I suppose I could cast it to an unsigned long to buy some more room, but using clock_gettime as R.. suggested is working great! –  Flying Hawaiian Aug 11 '11 at 20:06
1  
Casting to unsigned is not just to "buy some more room". It's that unsigned quantities cannot overflow in C. Unsigned arithmetic is defined modulo TYPE_MAX+1 and thus the substraction works exactly as expected unless a whole wrapping cycle takes place between the two calls to clock (which would never happen in normal usage). –  R.. Aug 11 '11 at 20:33
    
Ah thanks, that is a great explanation. From what I have learned in just this one interaction, I think I need to come by here more often. –  Flying Hawaiian Aug 11 '11 at 20:57

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