Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

let's say I have a matrix like this:

     [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5] [,6] [,7] [,8] [,9]
[1,]    1    3    5    7    9   11   13   15   17
[2,]    2    4    6    8   10   12   14   16   18

I'm looking for an easy way to substract the 3rd column from the 1st and 2nd, then the 6th from the 4th and 5th, and so on.

Can I do this without a for-loop?

Thanks in advance, zenzen.

share|improve this question
    
the documentation will depend on the language it is written in. what language are you writing it in? –  Laurbert515 Aug 11 '11 at 19:46
    
Should the resulting matrix have the same number of columns? I.e. columns 3, 6 etc. will be unchanged? –  Seth Aug 11 '11 at 20:09
    
Oh, I forgot to point that out. Yes, they should remain unchanged, and the resulting matrix should have the same dimensions. –  zenzen wakarimasen Aug 11 '11 at 20:14
    
@Laurbert515 it is tagged for the R language –  KennyPeanuts Aug 12 '11 at 14:22
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This answer isn't beautiful. It should really be made into a function for clarity, but:

m <- matrix(1:18,nrow=5,ncol=9, byrow=TRUE)
colsA <- (1:ncol(m))[1:ncol(m)%%3!=0]
colsB <- (1:ncol(m))[1:ncol(m)%%3==0]
m[,colsA] <- m[,colsA] - m[,rep(colsB,each=2)]

no for loop! And the result is:

     [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5] [,6] [,7] [,8] [,9]
[1,]   -2   -1    3   -2   -1    6   -2   -1    9
[2,]   -2   -1   12   -2   -1   15   -2   -1   18

edit: here it is as a function

nth <- function(x,n) {
  colsA <- (1:ncol(x))[1:ncol(x)%%n!=0]
  colsB <- rep((1:ncol(x))[1:ncol(x)%%n==0], each=n-1)
  x[,colsA] <- x[,colsA] - x[,colsB]
  x
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 I agree this works. –  Andrie Aug 11 '11 at 20:30
    
Yes, that's what I was looking for, thank you very much. :-) –  zenzen wakarimasen Aug 11 '11 at 20:43
add comment

Here is one way.

First I show the principle:

x <- matrix(1:20, nrow=2)
x[, seq(1, 7, 3)] <- x[, seq(1, 7, 3)] - x[, seq(3, 9, 3)]
x[, seq(2, 8, 3)] <- x[, seq(2, 8, 3)] - x[, seq(3, 9, 3)]
x

     [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5] [,6] [,7] [,8] [,9] [,10]
[1,]   -4   -2    5   -4   -2   11   -4   -2   17    19
[2,]   -4   -2    6   -4   -2   12   -4   -2   18    20

And next I define a helper function that make a little less typing:

myseq <- function(start, object=x){
  seq(start, 3 * (ncol(x) %/% 3), 3)
}

x <- matrix(1:20, nrow=2)
x[, myseq(1)] <- x[, myseq(1)] - x[, myseq(3)]
x[, myseq(2)] <- x[, myseq(2)] - x[, myseq(3)]
x

     [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5] [,6] [,7] [,8] [,9] [,10]
[1,]   -4   -2    5   -4   -2   11   -4   -2   17    19
[2,]   -4   -2    6   -4   -2   12   -4   -2   18    20
share|improve this answer
    
+1 This way clearly works as well. –  Seth Aug 11 '11 at 20:37
    
This works, too, but I like Seth's solution even better. But thanks to you, too! :-) –  zenzen wakarimasen Aug 11 '11 at 20:44
add comment
your_seq <- seq(from=3, to=ncol(your_matrix), by=3)

for(x in 1:length(your_seq)) {
col1 <- your_seq[x] - 1
col2 <- your_seq[x] - 2 
your_matrix[,c(col1,col2)] <- your_matrix[,c(col1,col2)] - your_matrix[,your_seq[x]]
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you Brandon, that would work. –  zenzen wakarimasen Aug 11 '11 at 20:27
    
If that works, I am surprised. Or I understood the question incorrectly, because it gives different results to my solution. –  Andrie Aug 11 '11 at 20:28
    
I missed [,your_seq[x]] originally. But now it's workin' –  Brandon Bertelsen Aug 11 '11 at 20:30
    
Oops, pressing "Enter" to add a new line is not a good idea... ;-) Is there a more flexible apporach. I have different matrices, so I'd with different numbers of columns. –  zenzen wakarimasen Aug 11 '11 at 20:30
1  
(b %in% bonnet) :-P –  Andrie Aug 11 '11 at 20:40
show 6 more comments

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.