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I am designing a Web application that we estimate may have about 1500 unique users per hour. (We have no stats for concurrent users.). I am using ASP.NET MVC3 with an Oracle 11g backend and all retrieval will be through packaged stored procedures, not inline SQL. The application is read-only.

Table A has about 4 million records in it. Table B has about 4.5 million records. Table C has less than 200,000 records. There are two other tiny lookup tables that are also linked to table A.

Tables B and C both have a 1 to 1 relationship to Table A - Tables A and B are required, C is not. Tables B and C contain many string columns (some up to 256 characters).

A search will always return 0, 1, or 2 records from Table A, with its mate in table b and any related data in C and the lookup tables.

My data access process would create a connection and command, execute the query, return a reader, load the appropriate object from that reader, close the connection, and dispose.

My question is this.... Is it better (as performance goes) to return a single, wide record set all at once (using only one connection) or is it better to query one table right after the other (using one connection for each query), returning narrower records and joining them in the code?

EDIT: Clarification - I will always need all the data I would bring over in either option. Both options will eventually result in the same amount of data displayed on the screen as was brought from the DB. But one would have a single connection getting all at once (but wider, so maybe slower?) and the other would have multiple connections, one right after the other, getting smaller amounts at a time. I don't know if the impact of the number of connections would influence the decision here.

Also - I have the freedom to denormalize the table design, if I decide it's appropriate.

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up vote 3 down vote accepted

You only ever want to pull as much data as you need. Whichever way moves less from the database over to your code is the way you want to go. I would pick your second suggestion.

-Edit-

Since you need to pull all of the records regardless, you will only want to establish a connection once. Since you're getting the same amount of data either way, you should try to save as much memory as possible by keeping the number of connections down.

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Even though I will always need ALL of the data to display? Either option will bring the same amount of data from the database to the code. One just does it in staggered connections with less data in each, and other does it all at once. –  user158017 Aug 11 '11 at 20:27
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Oh, I'm sorry, I must have misread your question. I wasn't aware that you needed to display everything. In that case, you will only want to establish a connection once. Since you're getting the same amount of data either way, you should try to save as much memory as possible by keeping the number of connections down. –  Charmander Aug 11 '11 at 20:30
    
That makes sense - I have heard that many narrow records can be better because the connections are staggered and so it would allow for more users at once, but I have also been concerned with the number of objects being built up with all those heavy-weights like connections and commands, even if I dispose of them at the end of the call. –  user158017 Aug 11 '11 at 20:37
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Not just memory but also latency in the case that you move the DB onto a different server. –  Paul Aug 11 '11 at 20:42
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thank you both - Charmander, if you could edit your answer to include your "final answer", I'll accept it. (I don't have edit privileges yet.) - And Paul, that was a great point I hadn't thought of. The DB IS on a different server. –  user158017 Aug 11 '11 at 20:48

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