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In the R Extensions manual, I found information about accessing R objects from C. In my situation, however, I am working with somebody else's C code which has a specialized data structure (call it Foo). My goal is to have R functions that:

  • initialize a Foo object. I don't want to have to store one of these in terms of R's lists or matrices.
  • update a Foo object. I don't want to have to recreate the Foo object to do this, but rather modify it in place. Also, this function might return information about whether the update was successful.
  • remove the Foo object from memory.

In other words, I would like to keep around a C object in an R environment, using R functions (backed by C functions) to create it, modify it, and delete it.

Thanks in advance for any advice.

share|improve this question
3  
Rcpp –  David Heffernan Aug 11 '11 at 20:49
    
I am familiar with Rcpp, but I haven't seen an example that does this sort of thing (where I am not actually passing back an R object, but instead a C++ object). And wouldn't this require me porting the existing C code to C++? –  Christopher DuBois Aug 11 '11 at 21:42
1  
Most C compiles pretty much as is in C++. As I understand it Rcpp is two way. –  David Heffernan Aug 11 '11 at 21:45
1  
David is correct, in both posts :) What you want can be done with either external pointers (Rcpp::XPtr) or, possibly more easily, with Rcpp Modules. –  Dirk Eddelbuettel Aug 11 '11 at 21:55
1  
@Dirk Why don't you write an answer for Christopher to accept. I know absolutely nothing about Rcpp, whereas you, I believe, know a little bit about it! –  David Heffernan Aug 11 '11 at 22:18

1 Answer 1

up vote 18 down vote accepted

As mentioned, the idea is to use an external pointer. This is described in the Writing R Extensions manual. Here's a quick example.

Include the relevant R header

#include <Rdefines.h>

We'll create an object that can hold a C char * of length at most 15

const int N_MAX=15;

The external pointer would like a finalizer, to be called when the external pointer is no longer represented by any R object. We play it safe here, checking that the pointer address is valid before freeing (with Free, because we'll allocate with Calloc -- these are C level memory allocation functions that persist across calls in to C, unlike R_alloc) and clearing the pointer to signal that it has already been finalized.

static void
_finalizer(SEXP ext)
{
    if (NULL == R_ExternalPtrAddr(ext))
        return;
    Rprintf("finalizing\n");
    char *ptr = (char *) R_ExternalPtrAddr(ext);
    Free(ptr);
    R_ClearExternalPtr(ext);
}

Here's our constructor. It takes some R 'info' that it'll carry around with it (not used later in this example) then allocates some memory for a short string. We construct an external pointer with x and info (the R_NilValue is a 'tag' that by convention we could use to label our object -- mkString("MyCObject") or similar). We associate our finalizer with the external pointer. The PROTECT / UNPROTECT are to safeguard against the garbage collector being triggered by the call to R_RegisterCFinalizerEx. The garbage collector may be called when R allocates memory; it's hard to know when this occurs (we could trace the code flow), so we play it safe and add the external pointer to the PROTECT when we create it.

SEXP
create(SEXP info)
{
    char *x = Calloc(N_MAX, char);
    snprintf(x, N_MAX, "my name is joe");
    SEXP ext = PROTECT(R_MakeExternalPtr(x, R_NilValue, info));
    R_RegisterCFinalizerEx(ext, _finalizer, TRUE);
    UNPROTECT(1);

    return ext;
}

Here's the getter, just referencing the external pointer address and returning it as an R character(1)

SEXP
get(SEXP ext)
{
    return mkString((char *) R_ExternalPtrAddr(ext));
}

and a setter that takes the external pointer and a character(1), copying the C representation of the first element of str into our object. We return a logical(1), but could return anything.

SEXP
set(SEXP ext, SEXP str)
{
    char *x = (char *) R_ExternalPtrAddr(ext);
    snprintf(x, N_MAX, CHAR(STRING_ELT(str, 0)));
    return ScalarLogical(TRUE);
}

If this is in a file tmp.c, we compile with

R CMD SHLIB tmp.c

or integrate this in a package as a file src/tmp.c and build the package as normal. To use:

> dyn.load("tmp.so")
> x <- .Call("create", list("info could be any R object", 1:5))
> .Call("get", x)
[1] "my name is joe"
> ## reference semantics!
> .Call("set", x, "i am sam i am")
[1] TRUE
> .Call("get", x)
[1] "i am sam i am"
> x <- NULL
> gc()
finalizing
         used (Mb) gc trigger (Mb) max used (Mb)
Ncells 339306 18.2     467875   25   407500 21.8
Vcells 202064  1.6     786432    6   380515  3.0

Here's a second example with a struct holding an int that is incremented.

#include <Rdefines.h>

struct Foo {
    int x;
};

static void
_finalizer(SEXP ext)
{
    struct Foo *ptr = (struct Foo*) R_ExternalPtrAddr(ext);
    Free(ptr);
}

SEXP
create()
{
    struct Foo *foo = Calloc(1, struct Foo);
    foo->x = 0;
    SEXP ext = PROTECT(R_MakeExternalPtr(foo, R_NilValue, R_NilValue));
    R_RegisterCFinalizerEx(ext, _finalizer, TRUE);
    UNPROTECT(1);

    return ext;
}

SEXP
incr(SEXP ext)
{
    struct Foo *foo = (struct Foo*) R_ExternalPtrAddr(ext);
    foo->x += 1;
    return ScalarInteger(foo->x);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Nicely done, Martin. I still prefer the Rcpp interface but Chris asked for C after all. –  Dirk Eddelbuettel Aug 12 '11 at 3:30
    
Beautifully answered. Thank you. –  Christopher DuBois Aug 13 '11 at 15:52
    
Follow question: When the C object is a struct (as opposed to char in your example, which works), I am having trouble doing member access operations. For example if Foo has int val, then I get a 'memory not mapped' error when I try to mimic the code for get() when x was a char): Foo *foo = (Foo *) R_ExternalPtrAddr(ext); int b = foo->val; –  Christopher DuBois Aug 13 '11 at 19:51
    
I added a second example; structs should be handled in the same way. –  Martin Morgan Aug 14 '11 at 15:39
3  
This is an incredibly valuable Answer. A clear, complete example like this should be part of the "Writing R Extensions" manual. –  cameron.bracken Jul 25 '13 at 10:16

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