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I am in process of learning and using Backbone.js.

I have an Item model and a corresponding Item view. Each model instance has item_class and item_id attributes, that I want to be reflected in as the 'id' and 'class' attributes of the corresponding view. What's the correct way to achieve this ?

Example:

var ItemModel = Backbone.Model.extend({      
});

var item1 = new ItemModel({item_class: "nice", item_id: "id1"});
var item2 = new ItemModel({item_class: "sad", item_id: "id2"});

var ItemView = Backbone.View.extend({       
});

How should I implement the view so that the the views 'el's will translate to:

<div id="id1" class="nice"></div>
<div id="id2" class="sad"> </div>

In most examples I have seen, the view's el serves as a meaningless wrapper element inside which one has to manually write the 'semantic' code.

var ItemView = Backbone.View.extend({
   tagName:  "div",   // I know it's the default...

   render: function() {
     $(this.el).html("<div id="id1" class="nice"> Some stuff </div>");
   }       
});

So when rendered, one gets

<div> <!-- el wrapper -->
    <div id="id1" class="nice"> Some stuff </div>
</div>

But this seems like a waste - why have the external div ? I want the el to translate directly into the internal div!

share|improve this question

7 Answers 7

Summary: dynamically set view attributes with model data

http://jsfiddle.net/5wd0ma8b/

// View class with `attributes` method
var View = Backbone.View.extend( {
  attributes : function () {
    // Return model data
    return {
      class : this.model.get( 'item_class' ),
      id : this.model.get( 'item_id' )
    };
  }
  // attributes
} );

// Pass model to view constructor
var item = new View( {
  model : new Backbone.Model( {
    item_class : "nice",
    item_id : "id1"
  } )
} );
  • This example assumes that you're allowing Backbone to generate a DOM element for you.

  • The attributes method is called after the properties passed to the view constructor are set (in this case, model), allowing you to dynamically set the attributes with the model data before Backbone creates el.

  • In contrast to some of the other answers: doesn't hard-code attribute values in the view class, dynamically sets them from model data; doesn't wait until render() to set attr vals; doesn't repeatedly set attr vals in every call to render(); doesn't unnecessarily manually set attr vals on DOM element.

  • Note that if setting the class when calling Backbone.View.extend or a view constructor (e.g. new Backbone.View), you have to use the DOM property name, className, but if setting it via the attributes hash / method (as in this example) you have to use the attribute name, class.

  • As of Backbone 0.9.9:

    When declaring a View...el, tagName, id and className may now be defined as functions, if you want their values to be determined at runtime.

    I mention this in case there's a situation where that would be useful as an alternative to using an attributes method as illustrated.

Using an existing element

If you're using an existing element (e.g. passing el to the view constructor)...

var item = new View( { el : some_el } );

...then attributes won't be applied to the element. If the desired attributes aren't already set on the element, or you don't want to duplicate that data in your view class and another location, then you may want to add an initialize method to your view constructor that applies attributes to el. Something like this (using jQuery.attr):

View.prototype.initialize = function ( options ) {
  this.$el.attr( _.result( this, 'attributes' ) );
};

Usage of el, rendering, avoiding the wrapper

In most examples I have seen, the view's el serves as a meaningless wrapper element inside which one has to manually write the 'semantic' code.

There's no reason view.el needs to be "a meaningless wrapper element". In fact, that would often break the DOM structure. If a view class represents a <li> element for example, it needs to be rendered as an <li> -- rendering it as a <div> or any other element would break the content model. You'll likely want to focus on correctly setting up your view's element (using properties like tagName, className, and id) and then rendering its content thereafter.

The options for how to have your Backbone view objects interact with the DOM are wide open. There are 2 basic initial scenarios:

  • You can attach an existing DOM element to a Backbone view.

  • You can allow Backbone to create a new element that is disconnected from the document, then somehow insert it into the document.

There are various ways you can generate the content for the element (set a literal string, as in your example; use a templating library like Mustache, Handlebars, etc.). How you should use the el property of the view depends what you're doing.

Existing element

Your rendering example suggests that you have an existing element that you're assigning to the view, although you don't show instantiation of the views. If that's the case, and the element is already in the document, then you may want to do something like this (update the content of el, but don't alter el itself):

render : function () {
  this.$el.html( "Some stuff" );
}

http://jsfiddle.net/vQMa2/1/

Generated element

Let's say you don't have an existing element and you allow Backbone to generate one for you. You may want to do something like this (but it's likely better to architect things so that your view isn't responsible for knowing about anything outside itself):

render : function () {
  this.$el.html( "Some stuff" );
  $( "#some-container" ).append( this.el );
}

http://jsfiddle.net/vQMa2/

Templates

In my case, I'm using templates, e.g.:

<div class="player" id="{{id}}">
<input name="name" value="{{name}}" />
<input name="score" value="{{score}}" />
</div>
<!-- .player -->

The template represents the complete view. In other words, there will be no wrapper around the template -- div.player will be the root or outermost element of my view.

My player class will look something like this (with very simplified example of render()):

Backbone.View.extend( {
  tagName : 'div',
  className : 'player',

  attributes : function () {
    return {
      id : "player-" + this.model.cid
    };
  },
  // attributes

  render : function {
    var rendered_template = $( ... );

    // Note that since the top level element in my template (and therefore
    // in `rendered_template`) represents the same element as `this.el`, I'm
    // extracting the content of `rendered_template`'s top level element and
    // replacing the content of `this.el` with that.
    this.$el.empty().append( rendered_template.children() );
  }      
} );
share|improve this answer
    
Awesome way to overwrite the attributes property with a function and return an object again! –  Kel Sep 12 '12 at 8:52
2  
@Kel yeah it's a good way to accomplish something dynamic like what the question asks for, populating the attributes with model data, without having to use repetitive code where the views are instantiated. You probably know this, but just in case it's not obvious, it's a feature of Backbone that you can use a function that returns a hash as the value of attributes, like a number of other Backbone properties that can be supplied as a function or some other type of value. In those cases Backbone checks if the value is a function, calls it, and uses the return value. –  JMM Sep 13 '12 at 22:02

In your view just do something like this

var ItemView = Backbone.View.extend({
   tagName:  "div",   // I know it's the default...

   render: function() {
     $(this.el).attr('id', 'id1').addClass('nice').html('Some Stuff'); 
   }       
});
share|improve this answer
7  
Please accept this as the correct answer so it gets bumped to the top. –  Gavin Schulz Feb 22 '12 at 17:45
6  
This answer doesn't demonstrate dynamically setting the view attributes based on model data, it just shows an alternative method of hard-coding the attribute values. –  JMM Apr 26 '12 at 20:12
2  
@JMM - His sample code isn't using the model data either. This answer works based on his sample code. Obviously model data could be substituted in for the values. –  Clint Jun 1 '12 at 16:12
4  
@Clint, I wouldn't count on that being obvious to the OP. "His sample code isn't using the model data either." -- that's because he doesn't know how, and hence why he asked for help. It seems clear to me that he's asking how to set attrs of view.el using model data and has no idea how to go about it. The answer doesn't even show how to do that, and why would you wait until rendering to do it anyway, or do it again every time you render? "This answer works..." -- how does it work? Every view created like that would have the same attr vals. The only thing it shows is how to avoid the wrapper. –  JMM Jun 1 '12 at 17:49
2  
@JMM - Point taken. Up-voted your answer :-) –  Clint Jun 1 '12 at 19:15

You can set the properties className and id on the root element: http://documentcloud.github.com/backbone/#View-extend

var ItemView = Backbone.View.extend({
   tagName:  "div",   // I know it's the default...
   className : 'nice',
   id : 'id1',
   render: function() {
     $(this.el).html("Some stuff");
   }       
});

EDIT Included example of setting id based on constructor parameters

If the views are constructed as mentioned:

var item1 = new ItemModel({item_class: "nice", item_id: "id1"});
var item2 = new ItemModel({item_class: "sad", item_id: "id2"});

Then the values could be set this way:

// ...
className: function(){
    return this.options.item_class;
},
id: function(){
    return this.options.item_id;
}
// ...
share|improve this answer
3  
I don't feel this answer correct because then every ItemView will have id: 'id1'. This has to be calculated in execution time based in the model.id. –  fguillen Mar 3 '12 at 10:21
    
You can of course set the ID any way you want. Use a function, variable or anything. My code just includes an example, pointing out how to set the value on the root element. –  Jørgen Mar 3 '12 at 11:20
    
I've added an example clearifying how to set the values dynamically based on constructor parameters. –  Jørgen Jul 31 '13 at 8:58
    
This is the correct answer. It uses Backbone features correctly to solve the problem. –  Marc-Antoine Lemieux Nov 8 at 17:31

The other examples are not showing how to actually grab the data from the model. To dynamically add id and class from the model's data:

var ItemView = Backbone.View.extend({
   tagName:  "div",

   render: function() {
     this.id = this.model.get('item_id');
     this.class = this.model.get('item_class');
     $(this.el).attr('id',this.id).addClass(this.class).html('Some Stuff'); 
   }       
});
share|improve this answer
    
Is that 'this.className' or 'this.class' ? –  Gabe Rainbow Sep 30 '13 at 19:00

You need to remove tagName and declare an el.

'tagName' signifies that you want backbone to create an element. If the element already exists in the DOM, you can specify an el like:

el: $('#emotions'),

and later:

render: function() { 
     $(this.el).append(this.model.toJSON());
}
share|improve this answer

I know it's an old question, but added for reference. This seems to be easier in new backbone versions. In Backbone 1.1 the id and className properties are evaluated in the function ensureElement (see from source) using underscore _.result meaning if className or id is a function, it will be called, otherwise its value will be used.

So you could give className directly in the constructor, give another parameter that would be used in the className, etc... Plenty of options

so this should work

var item1 = new ItemModel({item_class: "nice", item_id: "id1"});
var item2 = new ItemModel({item_class: "sad", item_id: "id2"});

var ItemView = Backbone.View.extend({       
  id: function() { return this.model.get('item_id'); },
  className: function() { return this.model.get('item_class'); }
});
share|improve this answer
    
Your example isn't valid, you'd want id: function() { return this.model.get('item_id'); }) –  Cobby Jan 8 at 5:24
    
Right you are, thanks for the correction. Edited the answer. –  Marcus Jan 8 at 12:56
var ItemView = Backbone.View.extend({
tagName:  "div",   
id : '',
class : '',

initialize : function(options){
if(!_.isUndefined(options)){
this.id = options.item_id;
this.class= options.item_class;

}
},

render: function() {
$(this.el).html(this.template("stuff goes here")); 
}       
});

Try to assign the values in initialize method this will directly assign id and class to the div attribute dynamically

share|improve this answer

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