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When I run this query the count(0) returns 21 for the set with zip='80005'.

select zip, avg(value), min(value), max(value), count(0) from values group by zip order by zip

There are really 109 rows with zip='80005'.

The following two queries both show 109 rows and they also return different values for min, max, and avg.

select avg(value), min(value), max(value), count(value) from values where zip='80005'

select zip, avg(value), min(value), max(value), count(value) from values group by zip having zip='80005'

There are no nulls for value.

Is there any reason why the first query is returning the wrong number of rows in the set for zip='80005'?

Maybe this is a bug in Postgresql.

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is not that count(0) = 21 the number of rows that it is returning your query?, you dont have a where in the first query –  Mr. Aug 11 '11 at 22:55
    
I don't need a where clause in the first query. I want to compute avg, min, and max for each zip code. The results from the first query for zip 80005 differ from what I find when I search for that zip 80005 alone. –  Dean Schulze Aug 12 '11 at 13:41

4 Answers 4

I think you want count(*) not count(0)...

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count(*) and count(0) give the same result: 21 –  Dean Schulze Aug 12 '11 at 13:39
1  
@Chris: There is no difference between COUNT(*), COUNT(0) or COUNT(1) in PostgreSQL. The COUNT function counts all non-NULL values. COUNT(*) doesn't evaluate the values, and works like COUNT(0). However, if you use COUNT(value) you'll get the count of non-NULL values. COUNT(*) and other fixed value non-NULL counts return the number of affected rows. –  jmz Aug 13 '11 at 12:38
    
These will always give the same result, so it isn't the source of the problem. –  Andrew Lazarus Aug 24 '11 at 18:32

Count(1), Count(*) and Count([field]) all work.

There was one source I read that said there was a performance difference between Count(1) and Count(*) (allegedly, count(*) required more processing), however, there seems to be evidence at least for Postgress & TSQL that it doesn't make a difference.

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What ever makes you think that? COUNT(data field) requires the query to fetch the data field, COUNT(*) or COUNT(some constant) do not. All versions require a sequential scan of the table, though, in order to access MVCC/transaction information to see if the row is visible to the current transaction. –  aib Aug 11 '11 at 23:54
    
Read about count(*) versus count(1) here (scroll down to the performance tip, or just CTRL+F for count(1)): techonthenet.com/sql/count.php. Maybe the documentation is wrong, or maybe it's different for different sql dialects. I guess you could test it out to make sure. –  Chains Aug 12 '11 at 2:07
    
Um, it does not name a database server nor does it cite a source. See postgresql.org/docs/current/static/functions-aggregate.html for Postgres. Also, please note the case where an unoptimized engine might check the expression 1 for NULLness, making it slower than a simple row count with COUNT(*). –  aib Aug 12 '11 at 8:59
    
Oh, haha, there actually was such a case: stackoverflow.com/questions/1221559/count-vs-count1 (search for 'oracle') –  aib Aug 12 '11 at 9:00
    
It's not a performance issue. It is a correctness issue. –  Dean Schulze Aug 12 '11 at 13:42

At first glance, this looks like a bug, hard to say without seeing your data.

You could try and narrow down the source of the problem.

If this :-

  select zip, avg(value), min(value), max(value), count(value) 
  from values group by zip having zip='80005'

returns 109, but this :-

select zip, avg(value), min(value), max(value), count(0) 
from values group by zip order by zip

returns 21 for 80005, what is returned for 80005 when you do this :-

  select zip, avg(value), min(value), max(value), count(value) 
  from values group by zip
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Look and see if you have records with zip 80005b where b is one or more trailing blanks. Those would collate somewhere else in your grouped zip list. I believe by default PG will ignore trailing blanks when testing two strings for equality, but not in a GROUP BY. (Do you have a sanity check constraint on the zip field?)

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