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I repeatedly use this SELECT query to read unsigned integers representing IPv4 addresses and present them as human readable dotted quad strings.

SELECT CONCAT_WS('.', 
  FLOOR(ip/POW(256,3)),
  MOD(FLOOR(ip/POW(256,2)), 256),
  MOD(FLOOR(ip/256), 256),
  MOD(ip, 256))
FROM ips;

With my test data, this query takes 3.6 seconds to execute.

I thought that creating a custom stored function for the int->string conversion would allow for easier to read queries and allow reuse, so I made this:

CREATE FUNCTION IntToIp(value INT UNSIGNED)
  RETURNS char(15)
  DETERMINISTIC
  RETURN CONCAT_WS(
    '.', 
    FLOOR(value/POW(256,3)),
    MOD(FLOOR(value/POW(256,2)), 256),
    MOD(FLOOR(value/256), 256),
    MOD(value, 256)
  );

With this function my query looks like this:

SELECT IntToIp(ip) FROM ips;

but with my test data, this takes 13.6 seconds to execute.

I would expect this to be slower on first run, as there is an extra level of indirection involved, but nearly 4 times slower seems excessive. Is this much slowness expected?

I'm using out of the box MySQL server 5.1 on Ubuntu 10.10 with no configuration changes.


To reproduce my test, create a table and populate with 1,221,201 rows:

CREATE TABLE ips (ip INT UNSIGNED NOT NULL);

DELIMITER //
CREATE PROCEDURE AddIps ()
BEGIN
  DECLARE i INT UNSIGNED DEFAULT POW(2,32)-1;
  WHILE (i>0) DO
    INSERT INTO ips (ip) VALUES (i);
    SET i = IF(i<3517,0,i-3517);
  END WHILE;
END//
DELIMITER ;

CALL AddIps();
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2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Using this one you could get better performance:

CREATE FUNCTION IntToIp2(value INT UNSIGNED)
  RETURNS char(15)
  DETERMINISTIC
  RETURN CONCAT_WS(
    '.', 
    (value >> 24),
    (value >> 16) & 255,
    (value >>  8) & 255,
     value        & 255
  );

> SELECT IntToIp(ip) FROM ips;
1221202 rows in set (18.52 sec)

> SELECT IntToIp2(ip) FROM ips;
1221202 rows in set (10.21 sec)

Launching your original SELECT just after adding your test data took 4.78 secs on my system (2gB mysql 5.1 instance on quad core (fedora 64 bit).

EDIT: Is this much slowness expected?

Yes, stored procedures are slow, a bunch of magnitudes slower than interpreted/compiled code. They turn out useful when you need to tie up some database logic which you want to keep out of your application because it's out of the specific domain (ie, logging/administrative tasks). If a stored function contains no queries, it's always better practice to write an utility function in your chosen language, as that wont prevent reuse (there are no queries), and will run much faster.

share|improve this answer
    
Does that give you better performance than the inlined version of the same tweaks? I'm not (yet) after a faster function, just trying to understand why the function version is so much slower than the inlined version of the same –  Day Aug 12 '11 at 0:33
1  
7.4 seconds for time mysql -u root test -e "SELECT IntToIp2(ip) FROM ips" > /dev/null vs 1.3 seconds for time mysql -u root test -e "SELECT CONCAT_WS('.', (ip>>24), (ip>>16)&255, (ip>>8)&255, ip&255) FROM ips" > /dev/null so this time the function call overhead is more than 5 times. –  Day Aug 12 '11 at 0:39
    
@Day nope the direct query is a lot faster; i assumed as a given fact that stored functions are inherently slower than interpreted/compiled code and just wanted to show you a better implementation; btw when stored function/procedures contain no queries, it's always better to implement the same as an external function. –  guido Aug 12 '11 at 0:49
    
Thanks for the edit - makes sense. –  Day Aug 12 '11 at 8:07
2  
And of course, for anyone reading the comments to this accepted answer, in this specific case, you should use the builtin INET_NTOA function as suggested in sanmai's answer –  Day Aug 12 '11 at 8:59

Don't reinvent the wheel, use INET_NTOA():

mysql> SELECT INET_NTOA(167773449);
    -> '10.0.5.9'
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2  
Wow. RTFM FTW. +1 for speeding up my specific case by miles, but the accept goes to guido who answered the generic "why is a function slower than inlining" question. –  Day Aug 12 '11 at 8:08
2  
And for comparison with the other solutions, it takes just 0.7 seconds to use this builtin function: time mysql -u root test -e "SELECT INET_NTOA(ip) FROM ips" > /dev/null –  Day Aug 12 '11 at 9:01

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