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I'm having a hard time deduping a list based on a specific delimiter.

For example I have 4 strings like below:

apple|pear|fruit|basket
orange|mango|fruit|turtle
purple|red|black|green
hero|thor|ironman|hulk

In this example I should want my list to only have unique values in column 3, so it would result in an List that looks like this,

apple|pear|fruit|basket
purple|red|black|green
hero|thor|ironman|hulk

In the above example I would have gotten rid of line 2 because line 1 had the same result in column 3. Any help would be awesome, deduping is tough in C#.

how i'm testing this:

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        BeginListSet = new List<string>();
        startHashSet();
    }


    public static List<string> BeginListSet { get; set; }

    public static void startHashSet()
    {
        string[] BeginFileLine = File.ReadAllLines(@"C:\testit.txt");
        foreach (string begLine in BeginFileLine)
        {

            BeginListSet.Add(begLine);
        }

    }

    public static IEnumerable<string> Dedupe(IEnumerable<string> list, char seperator, int keyIndex)
    {
        var hashset = new HashSet<string>();
        foreach (string item in list)
        {
            var array = item.Split(seperator);
            if (hashset.Add(array[keyIndex]))
                yield return item;
        }
    }
share|improve this question
    
Show us what you have tried so far. SO isn't here to do your work for you :-) –  James Gardner Aug 12 '11 at 3:01
1  
See this nice LINQ solution: stackoverflow.com/questions/1300088/distinct-with-lambda –  Mrchief Aug 12 '11 at 3:03
    
hmm, i guess i don't know what i'm talking about. –  James Gardner Aug 12 '11 at 3:20

5 Answers 5

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Try this:

var list = new string[]
                    {
                        "apple|pear|fruit|basket",
                        "orange|mango|fruit|turtle",
                        "purple|red|black|green",
                        "hero|thor|ironman|hulk "
                    };

var dedup  = new List<string>();
var filtered = new List<string>();
foreach (var s in list)
{
    var filter = s.Split('|')[2];
    if (dedup.Contains(filter)) continue;
    filtered.Add(s);
    dedup.Add(filter);
}


// Console.WriteLine(filtered);
share|improve this answer
1  
simple and works, not the best idea but simple –  user222427 Aug 12 '11 at 17:51

Something like this should work for you

static IEnumerable<string> Dedupe(this IEnumerable<string> input, char seperator, int keyIndex)
{
    var hashset = new HashSet<string>();
    foreach (string item in input)
    {
        var array = item.Split(seperator);
        if (hashset.Add(array[keyIndex]))
            yield return item;
    }
}

...

var list = new string[] 
{
    "apple|pear|fruit|basket", 
    "orange|mango|fruit|turtle",
    "purple|red|black|green",
    "hero|thor|ironman|hulk"
};

foreach (string item in list.Dedupe('|', 2))
    Console.WriteLine(item);

Edit: In the linked question Distinct() with Lambda, Jon Skeet presents the idea in a much better fashion, in the form of a DistinctBy custom method. While similar, his is far more reusable than the idea presented here.

Using his method, you could write

var deduped = list.DistinctBy(item => item.Split('|')[2]);

And you could later reuse the same method to "dedupe" another list of objects of a different type by a key of possibly yet another type.

share|improve this answer
    
Nice. was just typing that up as you posted. –  dlev Aug 12 '11 at 2:58
    
When i try to type in list.Dedupe, Intellisense doesn't detected the Dedupe. I tried Dedupe(BeginHashSet, '|', 2); but then i get Extension method must be defined in a non-generic static class. In my test i have everything being read into a HashSet First –  user222427 Aug 12 '11 at 12:52
    
@Mike, read up on extension methods if you are not familiar with them, but the quick takeaway is the extension methods must be static methods defined in a static class. You can convert this to a "regular" instance or static method as well, simply drop the this modifier before the first parameter and optionally drop the static modifier before the method return type. –  Anthony Pegram Aug 12 '11 at 13:32
    
You also do not need to load your strings into a HashSet first, unless that just happens to be how you're originally storing them. You can use an array, generic list, etc. –  Anthony Pegram Aug 12 '11 at 13:33
    
HashSet is how I am originally storing it so when I do Dedupe(BeginHashSet, '|', 0); it actually never enters the code when i debug. Dedupe(BeginHashSet, ',', 0); but if i try list.Dedupe it says does not contain .Dedupe –  user222427 Aug 12 '11 at 14:55

Can you use a HashSet instead? That will eliminate dupes automatically for you as they are added.

share|improve this answer
    
I would have used a HashSet, but i didnt think it would work in this situation because the entire entry in the hashset would be different then the key I was using. –  user222427 Aug 12 '11 at 3:16

May be you can sort the words with delimited | on alphabetical order. Then store them onto grid (columns). Then when you try to insert, just check if there is column having a word which starting with this char.

share|improve this answer

If LINQ is an option, you can do something like this:

// assume strings is a collection of strings
List<string> list = strings.Select(a => a.Split('|')) // split each line by '|'
   .GroupBy(a => a[2])  // group by third column
   .Select(a => a.First()) // select first line from each group
   .Select(a => string.Join("|", a))
   .ToList(); // convert to list of strings

Edit (per Jeff Mercado's comment), this can be simplified further:

List<string> list = 
   strings.GroupBy(a => a.split('|')[2])  // group by third column
   .Select(a => a.First()) // select first line from each group
   .ToList(); // convert to list of strings
share|improve this answer
    
The first projection isn't really necessary at all. Just do the grouping performing the split and taking the third column at once. –  Jeff Mercado Aug 12 '11 at 3:06
    
Thanks, that simplifies it a lot. I edited the comment to show without the redundant projection. –  drf Aug 12 '11 at 3:22

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