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Example (<Expected Exception> for assert 1 & assert 2 is same) :

@junit.framework.Test // or @org.testng.annotations.Test
public void testCase() {
    try {
        // assert 1
        fail();
    } catch (<Expected Exception>) {

    }

    try {
        // assert 2
        fail();
    } catch (<Expected Exception>) {

    }
}
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If I'm reading your intent correctly—each block within the try {...} catch should throw ExpectedException (otherwise, that's a test failure). Is it too hard to break up this test into multiple methods, and each annotated with @Test(expected=ExpectedException.class)? –  AlistairIsrael Aug 12 '11 at 3:15
    
@Cedric & AlistairIsrael : Thanks for the answers. But I'm hope there is a simpler approach. –  ahyea Aug 12 '11 at 8:34
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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you're feeling adventurous, you can also try out assertThrows:

https://github.com/dsaff/junit.contrib

Feel free to ask if you have any problems.

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Great! Thank for your effort. –  ahyea Aug 15 '11 at 6:51
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If it's too hard to break this up into individual test methods, here's what's worked for me in the past.

Create a method expectsException() that expects a Callback.

interface Callback {
    void call() throws Exception;
}

void expectsException(Callback callback) {
    try {
        callback.call();
        fail("ExpectedException was not thrown!");
    } catch (Exception e) {
        if (!(e instanceof ExpectedException)) {
            fail("Expecting ExpectedException, got " + e.getClass());
        }
        assertEquals("Expected exception message", e.getMessage());
    }
}

Then, wrap up the code inside your try {...} catch blocks in the Callback:

@Test
public void testSomething() {
    expectsException(new Callback() {
        public void call() throws Exception {
            // assert 1
        }
    });

    expectsException(new Callback() {
        public void call() throws Exception {
            // assert 2
        }
    });
}

Note however, that depending on what you're doing in the catch block, this may or may not end up less verbose than a straightforward try {...} catch.

(When Java gets proper closures, then this approach will make a lot more sense.)

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You should probably break your method into two separate methods that will each throw:

@Test(expectedExceptions = NullPointerException.class)
public void testCase1() {
  // assert 1
}


@Test(expectedExceptions = NullPointerException.class)
public void testCase2() {
  // assert 2
}
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catch-exception might help:

public void testCase() {
    // assert 1
    verifyException(obj, MyException.class).do(1);
    // assert 2
    verifyException(obj, MyException.class).do(2);
}
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