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So I have this:

<ul>
    <li>Line 1</li>
    <li class="disabled">Line 2</li>
</ul>

And the corresponding CSS is:

ul li:hover{
    color:red;
}

This allows for both 'li's' to be hovered over and have their color changed. But if I want one of them to be 'disabled', I'd use the following:

.disabled{
    color:grey;
}

But the other CSS code's 'hover' pseudo-class still kicks in... Any way I can override this?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 16 down vote accepted

The first rule overrides it because off CSS specificty, that is it's more specific.

http://www.htmldog.com/guides/cssadvanced/specificity/

Change second rule to:

ul li.disabled, ul li.disabled:hover{
    color:grey;
}
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1  
Also, for the official spec: w3.org/TR/CSS2/cascade.html#specificity –  jswolf19 Aug 12 '11 at 3:58
    
Using !important can come back to bite you, @Procrammer 's approach is a better option. –  irama Aug 12 '11 at 4:01
    
Won't work if the item should be grey all the time not just on hover: fiddle.jshell.net/88Z5Q/1 –  Jon P Aug 12 '11 at 4:01
1  
I also found out that it would be worthwhile to use something like ul li:not(.disabled):hover{color:red} - That would apply the hover effect to all li elements which do not have the class .disabled added... –  Abhishek Aug 12 '11 at 4:03
    
Good point @Jon P, updated to include that as well –  Ruxta Aug 12 '11 at 4:14

Change your CSS To:

ul li:hover{
    color:red;
}

.disabled ,.disabled:hover{
    color:grey;
}

See this fiddle

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.disabled{
    color:grey !important;
}
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4  
Try and avoid using !important where possible. It can lead to maintenance issues. –  joshnh Aug 12 '11 at 4:01
    
I agree... Though this does fix the example, the development case will need more finesse... –  Abhishek Aug 12 '11 at 4:02
1  
Why it should be avoided? Can you give me a link with description? –  hazzik Aug 12 '11 at 4:03
    
In larger projects you can end with a ball mud where everyone tries to override styles. Using !important is a sign for having bad structured CSS. First they try to using longer selectors and at the end you have bunch of !important statements. So !important isn't evil but its indicates that your CSS isn't well structured. Take a look at OOCSS and this blog: stubbornella.org to learn more about on how to build css that scales. –  Andreas Köberle Aug 12 '11 at 8:35

You just need to change your css:

ul li:hover{ color:red; }

ul li.disabled,ul li.disabled:hover{ color:grey; }

You have to disable the hover effect, so you give it the same color as when it wasn't hovered.

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I was trying to get a CSS "disabled" effect to be applied automatically when doing the following javascript:

  document.getElementById("TheButton").disabled = true;

If "TheButton" is defined with the class "TheClass":

  .TheClass { background-color: LightBlue; }
  .TheClass:hover { background-color: Cyan; }

The only thing that worked for me was with this CSS:

  .TheClass[disabled]            { background-color: lightgrey; } /* for IE */
  .TheClass[disabled='disabled'] { background-color: lightgrey; } /* for Chrome */
  .TheClass[disabled]:hover            { background-color: lightgrey; } /* for IE */
  .TheClass[disabled='disabled']:hover { background-color: lightgrey; } /* for Chrome */
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Minimum, if only need grey at every time, no need :hover on .disabled

ul li:hover{
  color:red;
}
ul li.disabled{// Last rule precedence
   color:grey;
}

Or for speed updating, use !important:

.disabled{
  color:grey !important;
}
ul li:hover{
   color:red;
}
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