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I play javascript with the book Professional JavaScript for Web Developers. I practice an example in section 6.2.6. the codes are listed below:

function creatPrototype(subType, superType) 
{
    function subTypePrototype(){};
    subTypePrototype.prototype = superType.prototype;
    subTypePrototype.constructor = subType;
    subTypePrototype.str = "say";
    return new subTypePrototype();
}

function Person(name, age) 
{
    this.name = name;
    this.age = age;
}
Person.prototype.say = function(){
    writeln("bill say");
}


function itMan(name, age){
    Person.apply(this, arguments); 
}
itMan.prototype = creatPrototype(itMan, Person); 


var Bill = new itMan("bill", 25);

writeln(itMan.prototype.str);    //expect "say"
writeln(Person.prototype == itMan.prototype.prototype);   //expect true
Bill.say();  //expect "bill say"

the result is:

undefined

False

bill say

Why?

  1. itMan.prototype.str is suppose to "say"

  2. Person.prototype AND itMan.prototype.prototype should point to a same object

  3. Bill.say() run correctly, so the prototype chain is OK.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You have to think about which property belongs to the constructor function and which one belongs to the instance. prototype is a property of the function, but constructor and str should be both properties of the instance.

This should do it:

function createPrototype(subType, superType) 
{
    function subTypePrototype(){};
    subTypePrototype.prototype = superType.prototype;

    var newPrototype = new subTypePrototype();

    newPrototype.constructor = subType;
    newPrototype.str = "say";
    return newPrototype;
}

But, as you are also passong subType, you can actually assign the prototype directly:

function inherit(subType, superType) 
{
    function tconstr(){};
    tconstr.prototype = superType.prototype;

    subType.prototype = new tconstr();

    subType.prototype.constructor = subType;
    subType.prototype.str = "say";
}

and then just call it with

inherits(itMan, Person);

Person.prototype AND itMan.prototype.prototype should point to a same object

Remember that prototype is a property of a function, not of objects. But itMan.prototype is a an object. You cannot access an objects prototype unless you explicitly refer to it (but I would not do so).

With ECMAScript 5, there is a way to get the prototype, using Object.getPrototypeOf [MDN]. This only works in newer browsers though.

Here is a working example of your code.

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You got the point. Your solution is similar to the original example from the book. subTypePrototype.constructor and str may not be one part of the return value new subTypePrototype() . –  delai Aug 14 '11 at 2:41

There were some mistake with the code, try this code

function creatPrototype(subType, superType) 
{
    function subTypePrototype(){
    this.prototype = superType.prototype;
    this.constructor = subType;
    this.str = "say";
}


    return new subTypePrototype();
}

function Person(name, age) 
{
    this.name = name;
    this.age = age;
}
Person.prototype.say = function(){
    document.writeln("bill say");
}


function itMan(name, age){
    Person.apply(this, arguments); 
}
itMan.prototype = creatPrototype(itMan, Person); 


var Bill = new itMan("bill", 25);

document.writeln(itMan.prototype.str);    //expect "say"

document.writeln(Person.prototype == itMan.prototype.prototype);   //expect true
Bill.prototype.say();  //expect "bill say"

In your code, you were not using this object so itMAn had no variable str, you were using subTypePrototype.constructor = subType; and subTypePrototype.prototype = superType.prototype; therefore Bill.say was working and Person.prototype == itMan.prototype.prototype was not working.

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Your approach is better, but assigning prototype and constructor to this is wrong. –  Felix Kling Aug 12 '11 at 7:27
    
Felix is right on this, is example show how to do it properly. –  Sebastien Thuilliez Aug 12 '11 at 7:41
    
@felix thanx for poining out, you are correct, your method is the correct one –  Ankur Aug 12 '11 at 8:43

Prototype is a reserved keyword and you have to be very careful while using it Articles on prototype keyword

You have several issues in your code.

Then within your createSubPrototype :

return new subTypePrototype();

You are creating a function and then you are returning the executed function result where you should return a pointer to your function like

return subTypePrototype;

But you should not create a function cause it seems you want to retrieve parent "prototype" :)

So indeed your code should look more like :

function createPrototype(subType, superType) 
{
  subTypePrototype = superType.prototype;
  subTypePrototype.constructor = subType; //- beware this is wrong !!!
  subTypePrototype.str = "say";
  return subTypePrototype;
}

Check the line I have marked as wrong, by doing so you are updating both sub & parent type

How to do it : That being said if you want to extend an object I would advise you to use existing libs. (jQuery, Mootools, etc ). Here a sample on how to do it properly

share|improve this answer
    
So, you are telling him not to use prototype, and yet your link is to articles which show how to use the prototype keyword? There is nothing wrong with using prototype; in fact it's the proper way to achieve javascript inheritence (at least says Douglas Crockford javascript.crockford.com/prototypal.html). –  RoccoC5 Aug 12 '11 at 6:19
    
I have to disappoint you, but prototype is not a reserved keyword: ecma262-5.com/ELS5_HTML.htm#Section_7.6.1 –  Felix Kling Aug 12 '11 at 7:20
    
Your creatPrototype is not correct as well. Any property you assign to subTypePrototype will also be assigned to superType.prototype. This is not a good approach. –  Felix Kling Aug 12 '11 at 7:30
    
@RoccoC5 : Thanks for pointing this out. You are right, I wrote this perhaps too quickly and my English was not that correct. I have update the post accordingly. –  Sebastien Thuilliez Aug 12 '11 at 7:39
    
@Felix : From my understanding it is, cause if you are computing your own prototype content on a class I doubt this object will work properly ... but anyway please correct me if I am wrong. Sure my sample is not correct but it was just to explain that the function usage was not that efficient this way. Then I provided deeper sample using the link. –  Sebastien Thuilliez Aug 12 '11 at 7:39

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