Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am using String Tokenizer in my program to separate strings. Delimiter I am trying to use is ");". But I found out that StringTokenizer uses ) and ; as 2 different delimiters. But I want to use it as combined. How can I do it?

my code:

StringTokenizer st = new StringTokenizer(str,");");
String temp[] = new String[st.countTokens()];
while(st.hasMoreTokens()) { 
    temp[i]=st.nextToken();
    i++;
}

Thanks

share|improve this question
10  
Please see stackoverflow.com/questions/6983856/…. It shows why the tokenizer will not work for a multi-character delimiter and shows alternatives (such as String.split(). –  Ray Toal Aug 12 '11 at 6:25
    
@Ray: I think that is correct and a good answer. –  Kowser Aug 12 '11 at 6:37
    
Ok I know now that I will have to use String.split() but it takes regex expression which I am not familiar with. Can you help me what regex exp I can use for ");" –  Gaurav Aug 12 '11 at 6:45
    
Since ), ; are special characters, for them to be interpreted as normal characters, you can done by preceding them with a defined escape character, usually the backslash "\". String[] result = str.split("\)\\;"); ll do the work. –  Swagatika Aug 12 '11 at 8:00

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

As many of the answers have suggested, String.split() will solve your problem. To escape the specific sequence you're trying to tokenize on you will have to escape the ')' in your sequence like this:

str.split("\\);");
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Jason. this is what I was looking for :) –  Gaurav Aug 12 '11 at 6:52

As an alternative to String#split (StringTokenizer is deprecated), if you like Commons Lang, there is StringUtils#splitByWholeSeparator (null-safe, and no need to mess with regular expressions):

 String temp[] = splitByWholeSeparator(str, ");" );
share|improve this answer
    
No, StringTokenizer is not deprecated! Common mistake, though! –  Ray Toal Aug 12 '11 at 6:39
    
Well, not @Deprecated, but "StringTokenizer is a legacy class that is retained for compatibility reasons although its use is discouraged in new code. It is recommended that anyone seeking this functionality use the split method of String or the java.util.regex package instead. " –  Thilo Aug 12 '11 at 6:41
    
Yes, exactly right, that is the source of the "mistake". Withdrawn. Little-d deprecated we can say! –  Ray Toal Aug 12 '11 at 6:43

You should try with the split(String regex) method from the String class. It should work just fine, and I guess it returns an array of Strings ( just like you seem to prefer). You can always cast to a List by using Arrays.asList() method.

Cheers, Tiberiu

share|improve this answer

"StringTokenizer is a legacy class that is retained for compatibility reasons although its use is discouraged in new code. It is recommended that anyone seeking this functionality use the split method of String or the java.util.regex package instead."

Thats what Sun's doc says.

String[] result = "this is a test".split("\\s");

Is the recommended way to tokenize String.

share|improve this answer

This will work for you.

import java.util.StringTokenizer;


public class StringTest {

/**
 * @param args
 */
public static void main(String[] args) {
    int i = 0;
    String str = "one);two);three);four";
    StringTokenizer st = new StringTokenizer(str, ");");
    String temp[] = new String[st.countTokens()];

    while (st.hasMoreTokens()) {

        temp[i] = st.nextToken();
        System.out.println(temp[i]);
        i++;
    }



}

}
share|improve this answer

Anything wrong with this?

String temp[] = str.split("\\);");
share|improve this answer
    
It gives regex.PatternSyntaxException. split() takes regex expression –  Gaurav Aug 12 '11 at 6:43

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.