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I'm using this exercise as a pedagogical tool to help me burn in some Java GUI programming concepts. What I'm looking for is a general understanding, rather than a detailed solution to one specific problem. I expect that coding this "right" will teach me a lot about how to approach future multi-threaded problems. If this is too general for this forum, possibly it belongs in Programmers?

I'm simulating a card reader. It has a GUI, allowing us to load cards into the hopper and press Start and so forth, but its main "client" is the CPU, running on a separate thread and requesting cards.

The card reader maintains a single buffer. If a card request comes in and the buffer is empty, the card reader must read a card from the hopper (which takes 1/4 of a second, this being 1962). After the card has been read into the buffer, the card reader sends the buffer to the CPU, and immediately initiates another buffer-loading operation, in advance of the next request.

If not only the buffer is empty but there are no cards in the hopper, then we must wait until the operator has placed a deck in the hopper and pressed Start (which always initiates a buffer-load operation).

In my implementation, card requests are sent to the card reader in the form of invokeLater() Runnables being queued on the EDT. At myRunnable.run() time, either a buffer will be available (in which case we can send it to the CPU and kick off another buffer-load operation), or the buffer will be empty. What if it's empty?

Two possibilities: (a) there's already a buffer-load operation in flight, or (b) the card hopper is empty (or hasn't been started). In either case, it's not acceptable to keep the EDT waiting. The work (and the waiting) must be done on a background thread.

For the sake of simplicity, I tried spawning a SwingWorker in response to every card request, regardless of the status of the buffer. The pseudocode was:

SwingWorker worker = new SwingWorker<Void, Void>() {
    public Void doInBackground() throws Exception {
        if (buffer.isEmpty()) {
            /*
             * fill() takes 1/4 second (simulated by Thread.sleep)
             * or possibly minutes if we need to have another 
             * card deck mounted by operator.
             */
            buffer.fill();
        }
        Card card = buffer.get(); // empties buffer
        /*
         * Send card to CPU
         */
        CPU.sendMessage(card); // <== (A) put card in msg queue
        /* 
         * Possible race window here!!
         */
        buffer.fill(); //         <== (B) pre-fetch next card
        return null;
    }
};
worker.execute();

This produced some odd timing effects - due, I suspect, to a buffer.fill() race that could occur as follows: if, between (A) and (B), the CPU received the card, sent a request for another one, and had another SwingWorker thread spawned on its behalf, then there might be two threads simultaneously trying to fill the buffer. [Removing the pre-fetch call at (B) solved that.]

So I think spawning a SwingWorker thread for every read is wrong. The buffering and sending of cards must be serialized in a single thread. That thread must attempt to pre-fetch a buffer, and must be able to wait and resume if we run out of cards and have to wait for more to be placed in the hopper. I suspect that SwingWorker has what is required to be a long-running background thread to handle this, but I'm not quite there yet.

Assuming a SwingWorker thread is the way to go, how might I implement this, eliminating delay on the EDT, allowing the thread to block awaiting a hopper refill, and handling the uncertainty of whether buffer-filling completes before or after another card request arrives?


EDIT: I got an answer from another thread and will recap it here:

Instead of using a SwingWorker thread, it was recommended I create an ExecutorService newSingleThreadExecutor() once, at the beginning, and have the GUI enqueue lengthy methods on it using execute(Runnable foo), as follows (this code runs in the EDT):

private ExecutorService executorService;
::
/*
 * In constructor: create the thread
 */
executorService = Executors.newSingleThreadExecutor();
::
/*
 * When EDT receives a request for a card it calls readCard(),
 * which queues the work out to the *single* thread.
 */
public void readCard() throws Exception {
    executorService.execute(new Runnable() {
        public void run() {
            if (buffer.isEmpty()) {
                /*
                 * fill() takes 1/4 second (simulated by Thread.sleep)
                 * or possibly minutes if we need to have another 
                 * card deck mounted by operator.
                 */
                buffer.fill();
            }
            Card card = buffer.get(); // empties buffer
            /*
             * Send card to CPU
             */
            CPU.sendMessage(card); // <== (A) put card in msg queue
            /* 
             * No race!  Next request will run on same thread, after us.
             */
            buffer.fill(); //         <== (B) pre-fetch next card
            return;
        }
    });
}

The main difference between this and SwingWorker is that this ensures there's only one worker thread.

share|improve this question
    
Got a working answer from a different line of questioning, and edited the original question to append my answer. (Will gladly change if this is not SO-protocol-correct!) –  Chap Aug 12 '11 at 23:10

3 Answers 3

It may help to know that SwingWorker uses an ExecutorService internally; it adds the interim EDT processing mechanism for convenience. As long as you update your GUI on the EDT and synchronize access to any shared data, the latter is equivalent to the former.

Assuming you are using the Model–View–Controller pattern, suggested here, your model is the operation of a cpu. Although it may be a different class, I can't see any reason to model the card reader on a different thread. Instead, let the processor model have a card reader model that does the waiting on a java.util.Timer thread, updating the model as the timer fires. Let the updated model notify the view in the normal course of posting events to the EDT. Let the controller cancel and schedule the card reader model in response to view gestures.

share|improve this answer
    
As an aside, I like how you render buttons programatically, but you should override paintComponent(). Also, AbstractSwitch extends JToggleButton would dramatically simplify your event handling, as shown here. –  trashgod Aug 13 '11 at 2:10
    
Are you by chance looking at some source code from www.jowsey.com? That's the only thing I can think of. I didn't write the GUI code for that; it was written 12 or 13 years ago by a buddy of mine. I wrote the CPU, and returned to the project recently to give it a card reader and teletype, in order to learn GUI programming. –  Chap Aug 13 '11 at 5:14
    
In retrospect, I think you're correct about using Timer rather than sleeping threads. But since this is a learning project for GUI concepts, I'm inclined to want to "pretend" that the background threads are really doing heavy work, which I'm offloading in order to maintain GUI responsiveness. (+1 for valuable observations.) –  Chap Aug 13 '11 at 5:20
    
very opened topic +1 –  mKorbel Aug 13 '11 at 6:42
    
Looking closer, I see the vintage dates on the source files. Sadly, it freezes my browser. I also see your point about simulating latency; one of the ScheduledExecutorService factories might be a good alternative, as ScheduledThreadPoolExecutor "is preferable to Timer when multiple worker threads are needed." Updating your question is good, but you can also answer your own question. You don't get any points for doing so, as commented here. –  trashgod Aug 13 '11 at 7:10
up vote 5 down vote accepted

There was one thing missing from the "answer" I had appended to the original question:

I was handing off the time-consuming work (nothing more than a Thread.sleep() for pedagogical purposes) to a background thread, via a Single Thread Executor. A problem arose, however, because the background thread was "reading a card" by poll()ing the List that was serving as the data model for a Swing component, and raising lots of AWT array index out of range exceptions. After several futile attempts to synchronize access to the List by both the EDT and my background thread, I punted, and wrapped the commands to poll() the List and update the GUI in a small Runnable(), and used invokeAndWait() to cause them to run on the EDT while my background task waited.

Here's my revised solution:

private ExecutorService executorService;
 :
executorService = Executors.newSingleThreadExecutor();
 :
/*
 * When EDT receives a request for a card it calls readCard(),
 * which queues the work to the *single* thread.
 */
public void readCard() throws Exception {
    executorService.execute(new Runnable() {
        public void run() {
            if (buffer.isEmpty()) {
                /*
                 * fill() takes 1/4 second (simulated by Thread.sleep)
                 */
                buffer.fill();
            }
            Card card = buffer.get(); // empties buffer
            /*
             * Send card to CPU
             */
            CPU.sendMessage(card); // <== (A) put card in msg queue
            /* 
             * No race!  Next request will run on same thread, after us.
             */
            buffer.fill(); //         <== (B) pre-fetch next card
            return;
        }
    });
}

/*
 * IMPORTANT MODIFICATION HERE - - -
 *
 * buffer fill() method has to remove item from the list that is the
 * model behind a JList - only safe way is to do that on EDT!
 */
private void fill() {
    SwingUtilities.invokeAndWait(new Runnable() {
        /*
         * Running here on the EDT
         */
        public void run() {
            /*
             * Hopper not empty, so we will be able to read a card.
             */
            buffer = readHopper.pollLast();  // read next card from current deck
            fireIntervalRemoved(this, readHopper.size(), readHopper.size()); 
            gui.viewBottomOfHopper(); // scroll read hopper view correctly
        }
    });
    // back to my worker thread, to do 1/4 sec. of heavy number crunching ;)
    // while leaving the GUI responsive 
    Thread.sleep(250);
     :
    etc.
}
share|improve this answer
1  
invokeAndWait () is a helpful in this context; see also this thread. –  trashgod Aug 14 '11 at 11:56
1  
+1 for link to comp.lang.java.gui thread. Almost over my head, with issues of happens-before semantics and interruptions, etc., but does seem to make the point that invokeAndWait() will work in my simple case here. –  Chap Aug 14 '11 at 18:33

1) create GUI, should be empty, or based on default values from Java package(s)

2) start periodic = new AccurateScheduledRunnable() {...};

    periodicMonitor = scheduler.scheduleAtFixedRate(periodic, 0, taskPeriod,
          TimeUnit.MINUTES);

3) declare monitor for ScheduledFuture<?> periodicMonitor; then you get for example ... remaining time from

periodic = new AccurateScheduledRunnable() {...};

long she = periodicMonitor.getDelay(TimeUnit.SECONDS); 

4) SwingWorker could support multithreading by using Executor executor = Executors.newCachedThreadPool();, then you can be able this one

5) whatever you expected ...

EDIT

hmmmm AccurateScheduledRunnable is custom Abstract Class

but for my enjoy I built this one, .. give an answer what I talked about

enter image description here

import java.awt.*;
import java.awt.event.ActionEvent;
import java.beans.*;
import java.text.SimpleDateFormat;
import java.util.Date;
import java.util.List;
import java.util.concurrent.Executor;
import java.util.concurrent.Executors;
import java.util.concurrent.ScheduledExecutorService;
import java.util.concurrent.ScheduledFuture;
import java.util.concurrent.TimeUnit;
import javax.swing.*;
import javax.swing.table.*;

public class TableIcon extends JFrame implements Runnable {

    private static final long serialVersionUID = 1L;
    private JTable table;
    private JLabel myLabel = new JLabel("waiting");
    private JLabel lastRunLabel = new JLabel("waiting");
    private int pHeight = 40;
    private boolean runProcess = true;
    private int count = 0;
    private SimpleDateFormat sdf = new SimpleDateFormat("HH:mm:ss");
    private ScheduledExecutorService scheduler;
    private AccurateScheduledRunnable periodic;
    private ScheduledFuture<?> periodicMonitor;
    private Executor executor = Executors.newCachedThreadPool();
    private Date dateLast;
    private Date dateNext;
    private Date dateRun;
    private int taskPeriod = 1;
    private int dayCount = 0;
    private int hourCount = 0;
    private int minuteCount = 0;
    private int secondCount = 0;
    private Timer timerRun;
    private int delay = 3000;
    private boolean bolo = false;

    public TableIcon() {
        ImageIcon errorIcon = (ImageIcon) UIManager.getIcon("OptionPane.errorIcon");
        ImageIcon infoIcon = (ImageIcon) UIManager.getIcon("OptionPane.informationIcon");
        ImageIcon warnIcon = (ImageIcon) UIManager.getIcon("OptionPane.warningIcon");
        String[] columnNames = {"Picture", "Description"};
        Object[][] data = {{errorIcon, "About"}, {infoIcon, "Add"}, {warnIcon, "Copy"},};
        DefaultTableModel model = new DefaultTableModel(data, columnNames) {

            private static final long serialVersionUID = 1L;

            @Override
            public Class getColumnClass(int column) {
                return getValueAt(0, column).getClass();
            }
        };
        table = new JTable(model);
        table.setRowHeight(pHeight);
        table.setPreferredScrollableViewportSize(table.getPreferredSize());
        JScrollPane scrollPane = new JScrollPane(table);
        add(scrollPane, BorderLayout.CENTER);
        lastRunLabel.setPreferredSize(new Dimension(200, pHeight));
        lastRunLabel.setHorizontalAlignment(SwingConstants.CENTER);
        add(lastRunLabel, BorderLayout.NORTH);
        myLabel.setPreferredSize(new Dimension(200, pHeight));
        myLabel.setHorizontalAlignment(SwingConstants.CENTER);
        add(myLabel, BorderLayout.SOUTH);
        scheduler = Executors.newSingleThreadScheduledExecutor();
        periodic = new AccurateScheduledRunnable() {

            private final int ALLOWED_TARDINESS = 200;
            private int countRun = 0;
            private int countCalled = 0;

            @Override
            public void run() {
                countCalled++;
                if (this.getExecutionTime() < ALLOWED_TARDINESS) {
                    countRun++;
                    executor.execute(new TableIcon.MyTask("GetCurrTime")); // non on EDT
                }
            }
        };
        periodicMonitor = scheduler.scheduleAtFixedRate(periodic, 0, taskPeriod, TimeUnit.MINUTES);
        periodic.setThreadMonitor(periodicMonitor);
        new Thread(this).start();
        prepareStartShedule();
    }

    private void prepareStartShedule() {
        timerRun = new javax.swing.Timer(delay, startCycle());
        timerRun.setRepeats(true);
        timerRun.start();
    }

    private Action startCycle() {
        return new AbstractAction("Start Shedule") {

            private static final long serialVersionUID = 1L;

            @Override
            public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {
                executor.execute(new TableIcon.MyTask("StartShedule")); // non on EDT
            }
        };
    }

    private void changeTableValues() {
        Runnable doRun = new Runnable() {

            @Override
            public void run() {
                if (bolo) {
                    bolo = false;
                    table.getModel().setValueAt("*/*/*/**/*/*/*", 0, 1);
                    table.getModel().setValueAt(" k k k k k k k k", 1, 1);
                    table.getModel().setValueAt("@#@#@#@", 2, 1);
                } else {
                    bolo = true;
                    table.getModel().setValueAt("Green Peper", 0, 1);
                    table.getModel().setValueAt("Yellow Apple", 1, 1);
                    table.getModel().setValueAt("Orange Bus", 2, 1);
                }
            }
        };
        SwingUtilities.invokeLater(doRun);
    }

    private void distAppInfo() {
        Runnable doRun = new Runnable() {

            @Override
            public void run() {
                dateNext = new java.util.Date();
                dateLast = new java.util.Date();
                long tme = dateNext.getTime();
                tme += (taskPeriod * 60) * 1000;
                dateNext.setTime(tme);
                lastRunLabel.setText("Last : " + sdf.format(dateLast) + " / Next : " + sdf.format(dateNext));
            }
        };
        SwingUtilities.invokeLater(doRun);
    }

    private void changeLabelColor() {
        Runnable doRun = new Runnable() {

            @Override
            public void run() {
                Color clr = lastRunLabel.getForeground();
                if (clr == Color.red) {
                    lastRunLabel.setForeground(Color.blue);
                } else {
                    lastRunLabel.setForeground(Color.red);
                }
            }
        };
        SwingUtilities.invokeLater(doRun);
    }

    @Override
    public void run() {
        while (runProcess) {
            try {
                Thread.sleep(5000);
            } catch (Exception e) {
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
            executor.execute(new TableIcon.MyTask("ChangeIconLabel")); // non on EDT
        }
    }

    private void setIconLabel() {
        SwingUtilities.invokeLater(new Runnable() {

            @Override
            public void run() {
                String text = "";
                dateRun = new java.util.Date();
                long tme = dateRun.getTime();
                long she = periodicMonitor.getDelay(TimeUnit.SECONDS);
                dayCount = (int) (she / (24 * 60 * 60));
                hourCount = (int) (she / (60 * 60));
                minuteCount = (int) (she / (60));
                secondCount = (int) she;
                int hourss = hourCount;
                int minutess = minuteCount;
                if (dayCount > 0) {
                    hourCount -= (dayCount * 24);
                    minuteCount -= ((dayCount * 24 * 60) + (hourCount * 60));
                    secondCount -= (minutess * 60);
                    //System.out.println(" Days : " + dayCount + "  ,Hours : " + hourCount + "  , Minutes : " + minuteCount + "  , Seconds : " + secondCount);
                    text = ("  " + dayCount + " Days  " + hourCount + " h : " + minuteCount + " m : " + secondCount + " s");
                } else if (hourCount > 0) {
                    minuteCount -= ((hourss * 60));
                    secondCount -= (minutess * 60);
                    //System.out.println(" Hours : " + hourCount + "  , Minutes : " + minuteCount + "  , Seconds : " + secondCount);
                    text = ("  " + hourCount + " h : " + minuteCount + " m : " + secondCount + " s");
                } else if (minuteCount > 0) {
                    secondCount -= (minutess * 60);
                    //System.out.println(" Minutes : " + minuteCount + "  , Seconds : " + secondCount);
                    text = ("  " + minuteCount + " m : " + secondCount + " s");
                } else {
                    //System.out.println(" Seconds : " + secondCount);
                    text = ("  " + secondCount + " s");
                }
                tme += she * 1000;
                ImageIcon myIcon = (ImageIcon) table.getModel().getValueAt(count, 0);
                String lbl = "Row at :  " + count + "  Remains : " + text;
                myLabel.setIcon(myIcon);
                myLabel.setText(lbl);
                count++;
                if (count > 2) {
                    count = 0;
                }
            }
        });
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        TableIcon frame = new TableIcon();
        frame.setDefaultCloseOperation(EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
        frame.setLocation(150, 150);
        frame.pack();
        frame.setVisible(true);
    }

    private class MyTask extends SwingWorker<Void, Integer> {

        private String str;
        private String namePr;

        MyTask(String str) {
            this.str = str;
            addPropertyChangeListener(new SwingWorkerCompletionWaiter(str, namePr));
        }

        @Override
        protected Void doInBackground() throws Exception {
            if (str.equals("GetCurrTime")) {
                distAppInfo();
            } else if (str.equals("ChangeIconLabel")) {
                setIconLabel();
            } else if (str.equals("StartShedule")) {
                changeTableValues();
            }
            return null;
        }

        @Override
        protected void process(List<Integer> progress) {
            //System.out.println(str + " " + progress.get(progress.size() - 1));
        }

        @Override
        protected void done() {
            if (str.equals("GetCurrTime")) {
                changeLabelColor();
            } else if (str.equals("ChangeIconLabel")) {
                //setIconLabel();
            } else if (str.equals("StartShedule")) {
                //changeTableValues();
            }
        }
    }

    private class SwingWorkerCompletionWaiter implements PropertyChangeListener {

        private String str;
        private String namePr;

        SwingWorkerCompletionWaiter(String str, String namePr) {
            this.str = str;
            this.namePr = namePr;
        }

        SwingWorkerCompletionWaiter(String namePr) {
            this.namePr = namePr;
        }

        @Override
        public void propertyChange(PropertyChangeEvent event) {
            if ("state".equals(event.getPropertyName()) && SwingWorker.StateValue.DONE == event.getNewValue()) {
                System.out.println("Thread Status with Name :" + str + ", SwingWorker Status is " + event.getNewValue());
            } else if ("state".equals(event.getPropertyName()) && SwingWorker.StateValue.PENDING == event.getNewValue()) {
                System.out.println("Thread Status with Mame :" + str + ", SwingWorker Status is " + event.getNewValue());
            } else if ("state".equals(event.getPropertyName()) && SwingWorker.StateValue.STARTED == event.getNewValue()) {
                System.out.println("Thread Status with Name :" + str + ", SwingWorker Status is " + event.getNewValue());
            } else {
                System.out.println("SomeThing Wrong happends with Thread Status with Name :" + str);
            }
        }
    }
}

abstract class AccurateScheduledRunnable implements Runnable {

    private ScheduledFuture<?> thisThreadsMonitor;

    public void setThreadMonitor(ScheduledFuture<?> monitor) {
        this.thisThreadsMonitor = monitor;
    }

    protected long getExecutionTime() {
        long delay = -1 * thisThreadsMonitor.getDelay(TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS);
        return delay;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for more choices. Sadly, the extant source is incorrectly synchronized, with no simple fix. If If I may ask, what is AccurateScheduledRunnable? –  trashgod Aug 13 '11 at 7:54
    
@trashgod please see my AccurateScheduledRunnable –  mKorbel Aug 13 '11 at 18:25
    
Excellent. As an aside, UIManager.getIcon() returns an Icon, not an ImageIcon, which throws a ClassCastException on aqua. Icon errorIcon = UIManager.getIcon("…") seems to work portably. –  trashgod Aug 13 '11 at 19:23

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