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Can you find a bug in this line of code? It returns nil!! The app is completely sandboxed but Downloads folder access is enabled.

NSArray*array = [[NSFileManager defaultManager] contentsOfDirectoryAtPath:[NSHomeDirectory() stringByAppendingPathComponent:@"/Downloads/"] error:NULL];
        //array==nil: Why?

[EDIT] Problem: I cannot test it. It is happening on a Guest account of the review machines. Could there be something wrong with the complied binary or have you got any tips how to solve this issue?

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Are you able to write into a file and get the file after your review team has run it? You can use [NSString writeToFile:atomically:encoding:error:] message. I edited my post below accordingly –  Wizz Aug 12 '11 at 14:17
    
What is the value returned by NSHomeDirectory()? –  Richard Aug 12 '11 at 14:26
    
@Wizz I had implemented a method that returns some information about the app (after Wizz's answer also the error) and writes it to a file. Now I am waiting for the answer (posted it in the resolution center). Will write another comment after I got a response. –  user610246 Aug 12 '11 at 17:59
    
@Richard NSHomeDirectory() returns "/Users/Guest" on the review machine. (The complete path: "/Users/Guest/Downloads"). Can you read something from it? –  user610246 Aug 12 '11 at 18:03
    
@Richard Now this is interesting. The method does not return an error but a completely wrong path when sandboxed. On their machine it returns: /Users/Guest/Library/Containers/[Bundle ID of App]/Data/Downloads Could you tell me how to get the right one, perhaps without hardcoding? –  user610246 Aug 13 '11 at 7:36

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Try to read the directory with an error handle to examine what happens:

NSError *error = nil;
NSArray*array = [[NSFileManager defaultManager] 
                  contentsOfDirectoryAtPath:
                   [NSHomeDirectory() stringByAppendingPathComponent:@"/Downloads/"] 
                                      error:&error];
if ( !array ) 
     NSLog(@"ERROR: %@", [error description]);

That will give you a more detailed description what went wrong.

To log this error to a file quick'n'dirty use the following message:

[[error description] writeToFile:@"strangeerrors.log" 
  atomically:NO encoding:NSUTF8StringEncoding error:nil];
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Thanks but sadly I am not able to log this. The problem is that this is not happening on my machine. It happens on a a machine of the review team. Could you give me perhaps some tips what to do now? I have also edited my question.. –  user610246 Aug 12 '11 at 8:13
1  
There's nothing you can do now. If your code ignores the success/failure and any error provided by the system, it was a conscious choice you made and these are the consequences. Your code is broken because it doesn't report easily-obtained system-level errors from an instruction that can fail. Fix your code as Wizz suggests (complete with logging), issue an update, then if the problem happens again, send the user instructions for sending you a copy of their console log. –  Joshua Nozzi Sep 21 '11 at 14:33

Have you tried replacing

[NSHomeDirectory() stringByAppendingPathComponent:@"/Downloads/"]

with

[@"~/Downloads" stringByExpandingTildeInPath]

?

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Thanks for your help. Sadly I don't know if this is the problem or the contents OfDirectoryAtPath:error: method. So I have to ask the same questions I have asked Mike. Should I try your example (I have to resubmit it ), is it possible/correct to resolve symbolic links in the sandbox, should I try another enumeration of the directory or should I simply contact Apple DTS? Or do you know why the app is behaving different on my Mac? –  user610246 Aug 17 '11 at 19:16

Almost certainly not the real problem here, but arguably it makes more sense to append @"Downloads/" as a path component, rather than with a leading slash. In Cocoa's eyes, asking for the components of @"/Downloads/" will give you:

@"/"
@"Downloads"

which is probably not what you intended.

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Thanks for your answer. Do you think that your example would make any difference? I have tried it by [NSSearchForDirectoriesInDomains(NSDownloadDirectory,NSUserDomainMask,YES) objectAtIndex:0] and resolved symbolic links because the documentation says that it "does not traverse symbolic links" but this failed also. Should I try your example (I have to resubmit it ), is it possible/correct to resolve symbolic links in the sandbox, should I try another enumeration of the directory or should I simply contact Apple DTS? Or do you know why the app is behaving different on my Mac? –  user610246 Aug 17 '11 at 19:11

You don't need to put in any slashed when appending path components. It's simply:

[NSHomeDirectory() stringByAppendingPathComponent:@"Downloads"] ...

Works fine for me!

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