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I am developing a GWT web application. I have a login page with one textbox for user name, one passwordtextbox for password, and one submit button.

Now I want my login page has this feature: when a user logs in again, in the textbox for user name, he can find all previous inputs.

For the moment, I don't have a clue how to do this. What should I look for? what kind of technique does this feature need?

An example for this feature is the login of hotmail. It can remember your previous input emails. I don't need my application to remember the password.

It would be nice if anybody can give me an example.

Thanks in advance!

Best regards

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think Cookies would do the trick. By the way, I have noticed for some reason SuggestBox does not support adding mouse or focus handlers so I have used the depreciated focusListener in my example. Proper way of doing this would be to use a FocusPanel to wrap the SuggestBox to catch the focus events.

public class LoginExample implements EntryPoint {

    static long forgetMeIn = 1000 * 60 * 60 * 24 * 365 * 30; //30 years
    MultiWordSuggestOracle oracle;
    SuggestBox suggestBox;
    Button loginButton;
    Button showCookieButton;

    public void onModuleLoad() {
        oracle = new MultiWordSuggestOracle();
        suggestBox = new SuggestBox(oracle);
        updateSuggestBox();
        suggestBox.addFocusListener(new FocusListener() {
            @Override
            public void onLostFocus(Widget sender) {
            }               
            @Override
            public void onFocus(Widget sender) {
                suggestBox.showSuggestionList();
            }
        });
        loginButton = new Button("Login");
        loginButton.addClickHandler(new ClickHandler() {
            @Override
            public void onClick(ClickEvent event) {
                String username = suggestBox.getValue();
                if (username!=null && !username.equals("") && !cookieContains(username)){
                    addToCookie(username);
                    suggestBox.setValue("");
                    updateSuggestBox();
                    Window.alert("Next time I will remember " + username);
                }
            }
        });
        showCookieButton = new Button("ShowCookie");
        showCookieButton.addClickHandler(new ClickHandler() {
            @Override
            public void onClick(ClickEvent event) {
                Window.alert(LoginExample.this.getUsernames().toString());
            }
        });
        RootPanel.get().add(suggestBox);
        RootPanel.get().add(loginButton);
        RootPanel.get().add(showCookieButton);
    }

    private boolean cookieContains(String s){
        boolean contains = false;
        String users = Cookies.getCookie("usernames");
        if (users!=null){
            for (String username : users.split(":")){
                if (username.equals(s))
                    contains= true;
            }
        }
        return contains;
    }
    private void addToCookie(String username){
        String users = Cookies.getCookie("usernames");
        if (users!=null)
            Cookies.setCookie("usernames", users+":"+username, new Date(new Date().getTime() + forgetMeIn));
        else
            Cookies.setCookie("usernames", username, new Date(new Date().getTime() + forgetMeIn));
    }
    private List<String> getUsernames(){
        ArrayList<String> usernames = new ArrayList<String>();
        String users = Cookies.getCookie("usernames");
        if (users!=null){
            for (String username : users.split(":")){
                usernames.add(username);
            }
        }
        return usernames;
    }

    private void updateSuggestBox(){
        oracle.clear();
        List<String> usernames = getUsernames();
        oracle.setDefaultSuggestionsFromText(usernames);
        for (String username : usernames){
            oracle.add(username);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
It is working, but it is not exactly what I want. I want when clicking the textbox, a list of previous inputs are displayed. –  NARU Aug 17 '11 at 12:30
    
Updated my answer –  pistolPanties Aug 17 '11 at 21:24
    
Thank you, that's what I need. Is there a security problem involved? –  NARU Aug 18 '11 at 9:09
1  
Cookies are stored in client's file system so they are easily accessible, so as long as you are not storing valuable information such as passwords (which you are not) you should be fine. if you are going to use this for production you should consider creating the cookie name something more unique than 'usernames'. Also if your application allows the character ":" in a user name, a cleaner aproach would be using base64 encoding for storing user names in cookie so that user names such as 'My:Name:is:Mike' do not cause a problem. This example is just a pointer, hope it helped –  pistolPanties Aug 18 '11 at 10:39
    
Yes, indeed, thank you again, it is really helpful. –  NARU Aug 18 '11 at 10:54

It's not really possible using JS only. You have to output the HTML for the text inputs server-side (so that the initial response that the browser parses already contains the fields) and just then manipulate it using GWT. Here's my response in a similar thread on the GWT mailing list.

I once worked on a project that did the same thing. They noticed the password remember stuff to late (they pretty much ignored it) and I had to fix this issue.

After some research the conclusion I reached was that it's best to keep the login process as "classical" as possible. By classic I mean, the HTML should not be generated by JS, but be written by the server, and the POST request should not be sent via Ajax, but rather using a normal form request. If you don't do this, the results will vary across browsers (this list is from memory):

  1. no browser will remember user/pass combo unless it sees the HTML as it parses the page. So, no JS generated form elements.

  2. As far as I remember, Firefox was the only browser that offered the remember password dialog for Ajax request (the heuristic were quite smart). The other browsers needed a classic request.

  3. Chrome was very picky in that the remember password dialog was shown only on the first page after the redirect. If it happens that you do two redirects after successful login, then no dialog is shown. Oh, and the response of the page should be 2XX, but that's to be expected.

There were a lot of other issues that I don't remember right now. So my advice is to go for a classic HTML form/request. You can have the form with "display:none" and after the GWT code loads reposition it wherever you want on the page, or even read the text input values and populate another form element with them. But, as I said, submission should not be done via JS.

You can go a step further and provide the login page as a classic HTML web page, and just after the user is logged in will she/he be able to see the GWT app.

share|improve this answer
    
Can you give me an example? –  NARU Aug 12 '11 at 8:11
1  
@IKEFORWARD, I don't have time right now, as it is quite involved. I'll try when I get home after work hours. Basically, just send the desired HTML to the browser, add some IDs on the text inputs, and then in your onModuleLoad load get a handle on those elements using Document.get().getElementById(String id). –  Ionuț G. Stan Aug 12 '11 at 10:44
    
Thank you, it would be really helpful if you can give me a simple example. –  NARU Aug 17 '11 at 8:08
    
Can this problem be solved by using cookies? –  NARU Aug 17 '11 at 15:16
    
I wouldn't use cookies for security reasons. Also, I think it would be harder to mimic the native autocomplete functionality. –  Ionuț G. Stan Aug 18 '11 at 8:01

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