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I need some help with the design of the Unit of Work + Repository + IoC pattern. I have several interfaces defined as follows:

public interface IRepository<T>
{       
    T GetEntity(int id);
}

public interface IUserRepository : IRepository<User>
{   
    User GetUserByXyz(int id);
}

public interface IUnitOfWork
{
    T Respository<T>() where T : IRepository<T>;
}

I am using Unity to resolve some references. Here's the implementation of the UoW:

public class UnitOfWork : IUnitOfWork
{
    public T Respository<T>() where T : IRepository<T>
    {
        var container = new UnityContainer();
        return container.Resolve<T>();
    }
}

Now i am having trouble calling the interface:

User user = _unitOfWork.Respository<IUserRepository>().GetUserByXyz(1);

The type 'IUserRepository' cannot be used as type parameter 'T' in the generic type or method 'IUnitOfWork.Respository()'. There is no implicit reference conversion from 'IUserRepository' to 'IRepository'.

How do get around the generic constraint error?

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2  
Where does IAccountRepository come from? Is that a typo in your code example above, or is the code you've shown here incomplete? –  stakx Aug 12 '11 at 9:31
    
It's a typo - updated the original post :) –  Fixer Aug 12 '11 at 9:35
1  
I suspect there are two different generics here - A T : IRepository, and a T: SomeOtherClass (eg User). Maybe it should be split to use TItem and TRepo? –  Jon Egerton Aug 12 '11 at 9:36
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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Initial note:

_unitOfWork.Respository<IUserRepository>()…

As it is, you're essentially "abusing" UnityOfWork as a service locator (you can ask it for any type of repository), but it doesn't seem to offer any additional benefits. Is this really what you want? Couldn't you just do away with UnitOfWork and do the following instead:

_unityContainer.Resolve<IUserRepository>()…

Alternative solution that does not require a second type parameter:

I agree with @Jon Egerton that for this to work correctly, one option would be to introduce a second generic type parameter (TItem next to TItemRepository). There is, however, another solution involving a marker interface IRepository:

// non-generic marker interface (empty)
public interface IRepository {}

public interface IRepository<T> : IRepository { … /* as before */ }
//                              ^^^^^^^^^^^^^
//                                  added

public class UnitOfWork
{
    public TRepository Get<TRepository>() where TRepository : IRepository
                                       // ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
                                       // this way, no 2nd type parameter is
                                       // needed since the marker interface is
                                       // non-generic.
    { 
        return new UnityContainer().Resolve<TRespository>();
    }
}

As requested: Unit of Work example:

If you follow Martin Fowler's definition for the Unit of Work pattern, you get something rather different from what you've got right now. Rather, a Unit of Work according to his udnerstanding merely keeps track of all changes that have been made to a collection of objects. The idea behind this is that changes aren't persisted (e.g. to a database) one at a time, but all at the same time, when requested through the unit of work object; thus the pattern's name:

class UnitOfWork<T>
{
    // the UnitOfWork object tracks changes to objects of type T:
    private HashSet<T> newItems;
    private HashSet<T> modifiedItems;
    private HashSet<T> removedItems;

    public void Commit()
    {
        // let's say items are persisted to an RDBMS, then:
        // * generate 'DELETE FROM [tableForItemsOfTypeT]' statements
        //   for all items in the 'removedItems' set;
        // * generate 'INSERT INTO [tableForItemsOfTypeT]' statements
        //   for all items in the 'newItems' set;
        // * generate 'UPDATE [tableForItemsOfTypeT]' statements
        //   for all items in the 'modifiedItems' set.
    }
}
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I' m not sure if I'm abusing the Unit of Work pattern, but the reason for using the UoW is to group all Repositories together making it easier to manage object states. As for the UoW being a Service Locator - partially true that's why I,m playing with Generics and trying to limit the scope :) –  Fixer Aug 12 '11 at 10:11
    
@Fixer, you're only "grouping" them together syntactically by providing an "entry point" from which repositories can be demanded; but real "grouping" would probably involve composition, i.e. having several different IRepository<> fields or properties in the same class. –  stakx Aug 12 '11 at 10:13
    
I see - Would you mind giving me a simple example? Sorry im new to UoW (as you can probably tell) –  Fixer Aug 12 '11 at 10:18
    
@Fixer: I'm not an expert on the topic either (but I'll make an attempt at providing an example); I merely saw a possible flaw in your solution. But if such as Repository<T>() method is what you need, then of course that's fine. –  stakx Aug 12 '11 at 10:22
    
@Fixer: added a very basic example for the Unit of Work pattern. –  stakx Aug 12 '11 at 10:39
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Expanding on my comment:

The statement public T Respository<T>() where T : IRepository<T> implies that you're expecting a type that is a Repository of itself, e.g. IUserRepository would have to be an IRepository<IUserRepository> to satisfy your condition.

You need two different generics, one for the item that is held in the reporsitory TItem and another for the repository itself, TRepo.

Then the whole code becomes:

public interface IRepository<TItem>
{       
    TItem GetEntity(int id);
}

public interface IUserRepository : IRepository<User>
{   
}

public interface IUnitOfWork
{
    TRepo Respository<TRepo,TItem>() where TRepo : IRepository<TItm>;
}

and

public class UnitOfWork : IUnitOfWork
{
    public TRepo Respository<TRepo,TItem>() where TRepo : IRepository<TItem>
    {
        var container = new UnityContainer();
        return container.Resolve<TRepo>();
    }
}

finally, the call becomes:

User user = _unitOfWork.Respository<IUserRepository,User>().GetEntity(1);
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Your definition of IUnitOfWork seems a little peculiar, and it seems you've got your generic parameter constraint wrong:

public interface IUnitOfWork
{
    T Respository<T>() where T : IRepository<T>;
}

I'd try to get rid of the generic parameter constraint, if possible. For example:

public interface IUnitOfWork<T>
{
    IRepository<T> Respository { get; }
}

public class UnitOfWork<T> : IUnitOfWork<T>
{
    public IRepository<T> Respository
    {
        get
        {
            var container = new UnityContainer();
            return container.Resolve<IRepository<T>>();
        }
    }
}

(Admittedly, I'm not sure whether it's a good idea to constrain a UnitOfWork class to one particular object type by parameterizing it this way. You could in theory also have a UnitOfWork class that implements IUnitOfWork<T> several times, for different T, though that's probably equally unwise. Judge yourself what is most appropriate for your purposes.)

Note that you'd then also have to register your types differently. You could possibly also get rid of IUserRepository this way.

P.S.: Probably, Repository does make more sense if it's a method, and not a property, as shown above. I'd choose based on how costly it is to "get" a repository. If it's expensive, make it a method; if it's a cheap operation, a property might be just fine. If you keep it as a method, I'd rename it to GetRepository to better adhere to the common .NET naming guidelines. Alternative approach:

public interface IUnitOfWork
{
    IRepository<T> GetRespository<T>()
}
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I was hoping to call the method on the child interface e.g GetUserByXyz. That's why i was trying to return the type as T. Modified OP. –  Fixer Aug 12 '11 at 9:53
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You are confusing your Generic constraint:

public T Respository<T,U>() where T : IRepository<U> 

User user = _unitOfWork.Respository<IUserRepository,User>().GetEntity(1);
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