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I'm trying to create a select input from javascript and bind a function to when a user changes an option. So far I have:

filter.change = function() {
    console.log("CHANGED");
}

But nothing happens on selecting something else. What is wrong with this code. Also, how can I get the new selected value in the function ? Something like:

console.log(this.value + "has been selected")
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3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You were close, you need to use onchange:

filter.onchange = function() {
    alert("CHANGED");
    //You can alert the value of the selected option, using this:
    alert(this.value + " was selected");
}

Of course as Delan said, you should addEventListener (and attachEvent) whenever possible. Example:

//Define a onchange handler:
var changeHandler = function() {
    alert("CHANGED");
    //You can alert the value of the selected option, using this:
    alert(this.value + " was selected");
}
//First try using addEventListener, the standard method to add a event listener:
if(filter.addEventListener)
  filter.addEventListener("change", changeHandler, false);
//If it doesn't exist, try attachEvent, the IE way:
else if(filter.attachEvent)
  filter.attachEvent("onchange", changeHandler);
//Just use onchange if neither exist
else
  filter.onchange = changeHandler;
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2  
Of course, one should use addEventListener where available. –  Delan Azabani Aug 12 '11 at 9:43

If you use this way, the property name is onchange:

filter.onchange = function() {
     alert(this.value + "has been selected");
};

Further information:

Note: There is also another way to register event handlers, which allows to assign multiple event handlers for the same event. For more information, have a look at quirksmode.org - Advanced event registration models.

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Of course, one should use addEventListener where available. –  Delan Azabani Aug 12 '11 at 9:42
    
Why use addEventListener? stackoverflow.com/questions/6929528/… –  js-coder Aug 12 '11 at 9:43
    
@Delan: I would say it depends. If you create a library for sure. If you use it for your own site and don't use any other libraries, this way is easier with respect to all the browser differences. –  Felix Kling Aug 12 '11 at 9:45
1  
Well, the most significant benefit of moving away from the traditional event model is being able to easily add and manage multiple function listeners on an object's event. –  Delan Azabani Aug 12 '11 at 9:47
    
@Delan: Yes, but this comes with the added complexity of handling the differences between W3C and IE. In a simple setup you just don't need this. But I will make a remark... –  Felix Kling Aug 12 '11 at 9:49

if you would use jQuery, you can use it like this

$('select').change(function(){
   alert($('select').val() + ' was just selected');
});

or use .onchange

filter.onchange = function() {
    alert(this.value + " was selected");
}

instead of .change

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3  
This is correct, but totally unnecessary. –  Delan Azabani Aug 12 '11 at 9:43

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