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Input.txt

CASE
    REPEAT 1 TIMES
    ENDREPEAT
ENDCASE
    REPEAT
    ENDREPEAT
CASE
    REPEAT 2 TIMES
    ENDREPEAT
ENDCASE

code.pl

open (FH, "input.txt");
my @arr = <FH>;

foreach (@arr) {
    if ($_ =~ s/ENDCASE.*?CASE//gsi) {
       $_ = s/ENDCASE.*?CASE//gsi;
    }
}
print @arr;

Output : perl code.pl

It prints the Array without modifying........

CASE
    REPEAT 1 TIMES
    ENDREPEAT
ENDCASE
    REPEAT        ===> To be Removed
    ENDREPEAT     ===> To be Removed
CASE
    REPEAT 2 TIMES
    ENDREPEAT
ENDCASE

Output Needed is, ***||||||||||||****

CASE
    REPEAT 1 TIMES
    ENDREPEAT
ENDCASE
************Content Removed*****************
CASE
    REPEAT 2 TIMES
    ENDREPEAT
ENDCASE

Please Guide me to get this output.

Thanks in advance.........

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Could you please at least format your question so that it is clear, what is data/code? –  Felix Kling Aug 12 '11 at 9:55
    
You need to specify whether you want 'anything not between CASE / ENDCASE removed' or 'REPEAT / ENDREPEAT removed unless embedded in CASE / ENDCASE'. In the example, the outputs are the same; in the more general case, they are not. You should also specify what should happen with 'REPEAT n TIMES / REPEAT m TIMES / ENDREPEAT / ENDREPEAT'. And is it safe to assume that the language requires these keywords as the first non-blank text on the line, or is the layout free-form? –  Jonathan Leffler Aug 12 '11 at 11:45
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4 Answers

This can be done through the command line as well à la flip-flop operator.


To just output the result to screen

$ perl -ne 'print if /^CASE/ .. /^ENDCASE/' Input.txt

To direct the output to another file

$ perl -ne 'print if /^CASE/ .. /^ENDCASE/' Input.txt > output.txt

To modify the file in-place

$ perl -ni.bak -e 'print if /^CASE/ .. /^ENDCASE/' Input.txt

Replace ' (single-quotes) with "(double-quotes) if on Windows.

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You've got a couple of suggestions of ways to address your problem, but you might be interested to hear why your solution didn't work. There are a couple of reasons.

Firstly, When you read your file into @arr you get one line of the file in each element of the array. And when you process the array an element at at time, no element contains both ENDCASE and CASE so your regex never matches and nothing is changed.

For your approach to work, you need to rewrite the program to process the whole file in one go. (I've also cleaned up your code a little.)

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

open (my $fh, '<', 'input.txt') or die $!;
my $file = do { local $/; <$fh> };

$file =~ s/ENDCASE.*?CASE//gsi;

print $file;

But this doesn't fix the problem. It gives the output:

CASE
    REPEAT 1 TIMES
    ENDREPEAT

    REPEAT 2 TIMES
    ENDREPEAT
ENDCASE

That's because the ENDCASE and CASE are included in your regex so they get removed. You'll need to look at lookahead and lookbehind assertions in perlre to fix this issue. I'll leave that as an exercise for the reader.

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That depends how big the input.txt is. If it's relative big, there is really no reason to load the whole file in the memory. –  Dimitar Petrov Aug 12 '11 at 13:15
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Tie your file using Tie::File:

tie @array, 'Tie::File', filename or die ...;

Manipulate the lines, in any way you see fit, and then untie the array:

untie @array;   

Thus, your modifications will be reflected in the original file.

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Here's a weird idea that just might work.

use English qw<$INPLACE_EDIT $RS>;
$INPLACE_EDIT = '.bak';
local $RS     = "CASE\n";

while ( <$input> ) {
    print(( !/^(END)?CASE\n\z/ms or $1 ) ? $_ : $RS );
}

The idea is that you break up your records not by newlines, but by CASE + \n and thus you get to treat all the lines between an ENDCASE and a CASE as one record that you can simply replace with "CASE\n".

Note that we simply print the record unless we see a line start before 'ENDCASE' or 'CASE' followed by a newline. So even though we make a pretty brittle assumption when breaking up the records, we check our assumption before modifying the record. Also if it matches "ENDCASE\n" then $1 is 'END' and we print that record unmodified.

This can break, though. If for some reason you were capable of having a comment here:

ENDCASE
    REPEAT       ===> This prints because it ends with CASE
    ENDREPEAT     
CASE

Then the first line would be printed. So we could do this:

my $match = 0;
my $old_1;
while ( <$input> ) {
    if ( m/^(END)?CASE\n\z/ms and not $1 ) {
        print $RS;
    }
    else {
        next if $old_1;
        print;
    }
    $old_1 = $1;
}    
share|improve this answer
    
I think I prefer split to $/ usage here. For example: split /(?=\nCASE\n)/, $_; Easier to compensate for comments too. –  TLP Aug 12 '11 at 13:33
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