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I am regularly using stata at work. My text editor of choice is (g)vim. I have been using the scripts provided here or here to send code from vim to stata. This functionality is immensely practical and virtually the only thing the keeps me from switching to linux completely. The scripts are written in AutoIT, so I cannot use them in linux. They are also basically independent from the choice of text editor, the people who wrote them are using notepad++.

Essentially, these scripts together with a few lines in my vimrc allow me to send selections or the whole file to a running stata window (if none is open, stata is started first).

I am looking for a solution that does this in linux, but I have no idea where to start. In linux there are two different stata versions, stata for the command line and xstata is the gui version. I need to use the gui version as the functionality of the command line version is limited unfortunately, so screen/tmux are ruled out.

If this is trivial, I'm really sorry for missing it and would be immensely grateful for a solution. I also wasn't able to find an existing plugin for vim I could utilize. If not, I am willing to invest some time and figure out how to implement a solution. A pointer in the right direction would however be quite helpful. I am relatively new to linux and programming in general, but willing to learn.

Regarding tools: I don't know bash, but it is something I want to look into anyways at some point. I have dabbled a bit in python, so that would also be ok. In case there is anything else absolutely superior for this task, please let me know.

Any help is greatly appreciated. The AutoIT scripts are hosted on the website, but I can post my windows setup here if necessary.

EDIT

Ok, after some debate in the comments, here is the essential AutoIT script that I need to translate. (I would prefer a solution that doesn't overwrite the content of the system clipboard each time though.)

Edit2 I guess this is what the script does essentially: It checks for an open stata window, selects it (or executes one), pastes the contents that are to be executed into a temporary file, switches to the stata window, selects the command line with ctrl-1 (and anything that might already be written there with ctrl-a) and then pastes do "tempfile" into the commandline, which then executes the code that was sent. At least that is how I understand it.

FINAL COMMENT

I have worked up a solution in bash some time ago, it is posted here as an answer to a previous version of this question.

; Declare variables
Global $ini, $statapath, $statawin, $statacmd, $dofile, $clippause, $winpause, $keypause

; File locations
; Path to INI file
$ini = @ScriptDir & "\rundo.ini"
;; contents of ini file are the following
    ;[Stata]
    ;; Path to Stata executable
    ;statapath = "C:\Program Files\Stata11\StataSE.exe"
    ;; Title of Stata window
    ;statawin = "Stata/SE 11.2"
    ;; Keyboard shortcut for Stata command window
    ;statacmd = "^1"
    ;[Delays]
    ;; Pause after copying of Stata commands to clipboard, in milliseconds
    ;; Use higher number if script fails (default: 100, recommended range: 0 - 200)
    ;clippause = 100
    ;; Pause between window-related operations, in milliseconds
    ;; Use lower number to speed up script, higher number if script fails (default: 200)
    ;winpause = 200
    ;; Pause between key strokes sent to Stata, in milliseconds
    ;; Use lower number to speed up script, higher number if script fails (default: 1)
    ;keypause = 1


; Path to Stata executable
$statapath = IniRead($ini, "Stata", "statapath", "C:\Program Files\Stata11\StataSE.exe")
; Title of Stata window
$statawin = IniRead($ini, "Stata", "statawin", "Stata/SE 11.2")

; Keyboard shortcut for Stata command window
$statacmd = IniRead($ini, "Stata", "statacmd", "^1")

; Path to do-file that is passed to AutoIt
; Edit line to match editor used, if necessary
$dofile = $CmdLine[1]

; Delays
; Pause after copying of Stata commands to clipboard
$clippause = IniRead($ini, "Delays", "clippause", "100")
; Pause between window-related operations
$winpause = IniRead($ini, "Delays", "winpause", "200")
; Pause between keystrokes sent to Stata
$keypause = IniRead($ini, "Delays", "keypause", "1")

; Set WinWaitDelay and SendKeyDelay to speed up or slow down script
Opt("WinWaitDelay", $winpause)
Opt("SendKeyDelay", $keypause)

; If more than one Stata window is open, the window that was most recently active will be matched
Opt("WinTitleMatchMode", 2)

; Check if Stata is already open, start Stata if not
If WinExists($statawin) Then
  WinActivate($statawin)
  WinWaitActive($statawin)
  ; Activate Stata command window and select text (if any)
  Send($statacmd)
  Send("^a")
  ; Run saved do-file
  ; Double quotes around $dofile needed in case path contains blanks
  ClipPut("do " & '"' & $dofile & '"')
  ; Pause avoids problem with clipboard, may be AutoIt or Windows bug
  Sleep($clippause)
  Send("^v" & "{Enter}")
Else
  Run($statapath)
  WinWaitActive($statawin)
  ; Activate Stata command window
  Send($statacmd)
  ; Run saved do-file
  ; Double quotes around $dofile needed in case path contains blanks
  ClipPut("do " & '"' & $dofile & '"')
  ; Pause avoids problem with clipboard, may be AutoIt or Windows bug
  Sleep($clippause)
  Send("^v" & "{Enter}")
EndIf
share|improve this question
    
Have you (1) looked at fmwww.bc.edu/repec/bocode/t/texteditors.html#unix? (2) asked at statalist (stata.com/support/faqs/res/statalist.html)? I personally work in text editor and just type do the_whole_thing in Stata. If the_whole_thing takes too long to run, you need to break it down into smaller manageable pieces, which is the standard programming advice, and store the intermediate results, which is available for both data and estimation results in Stata. (See also stata.com/bookstore/wdaus.html) –  StasK Aug 12 '11 at 14:24
    
I know nothing about stata, however there are scripts out there that use screen/tmux to do this sort of things. Check out this one for an example: vim.org/scripts/script.php?script_id=2711 –  Randy Morris Aug 12 '11 at 14:50
    
@Randy: I guess the biggest problem is that you need to get inside a running executable file; the OP was not so much interested in the "batch" mode, sending to which does not represent any problem. (I am at the opposite side of the spectrum: I know nothing about vim, but I know quite a bit about Stata.) –  StasK Aug 12 '11 at 15:26
    
@StasK with that script you can send input to an executable running within gnu-screen or tmux as if the user typed it. This wouldn't work if stata doesn't have a command line interface though. –  Randy Morris Aug 12 '11 at 16:06
    
@Randy: it does have a command line interface, but the OP indicated that he looked at tmux, and it did not work out. The executable may not be particularly receptive to stuff coming from outside. It was intended to be used in an interactive data analysis, but you can run scripts in it, as well, either in batch mode, or by requesting it to run a script from that interactive command line mode. This is a commerical software, so asking the developers to make it more receptive is probably out of question. –  StasK Aug 12 '11 at 16:16

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

IronAHK is a Linux/Mono rewrite of the AutoHotKey scripting language, which is similar to AutoIt (a GUI automation / keyboard remapping tool). I haven't used IronAHK, but AutoHotkey can run AutoIt v2 scripts.

You can also look @Project Sikuli: "Sikuli is a visual technology to automate and test graphical user interfaces (GUI) using images (screenshots). Sikuli includes Sikuli Script, a visual scripting API for Jython, and Sikuli IDE, an integrated development environment for writing visual scripts with screenshots easily" (from the sikuli front page)

Another good option is Linux Desktop Testing Project (LDTP), scriptable with Python:

example:

from ldtp import *
from ldtputils import *

try:
    launchapp("gedit")
    if waittillguiexist("*.gedit")==0:
        raise LdtpExecutionError("Gedit window does not exist")

    selectmenuitem("*-gedit", "mnuFile;mnuOpen")
    selectrow("dkgOpenFiles...", "tblFiles", fileName[0])
    ...
share|improve this answer
    
I'm looking into it, but development of IronAHK seems to have slowed down somewhat recetnly. Running make already produces an error, and half of the links on their hp dont work. Also, the scripts are written AutoIT 3. I'm guessing a native linux solution might be easier. –  ilprincipe Aug 22 '11 at 22:18
1  
@ilprincipe: Project Sikuli (sikuli.org) may also worth a look: "Sikuli is a visual technology to automate and test graphical user interfaces (GUI) using images (screenshots). Sikuli includes Sikuli Script, a visual scripting API for Jython, and Sikuli IDE, an integrated development environment for writing visual scripts with screenshots easily" –  PabloG Aug 24 '11 at 17:25
    
LDTP seems exactly like the solution I was looking for. I'll probably accept this as an answer, however I have in the meantime stumbled across wmctrl and xte and written a somewhat clunky hack in bash. I'll add it to my post later. –  ilprincipe Aug 28 '11 at 20:33

I've used the VI map function to define macros to send my file to a C compiler, and retrieve the results. It's not very robust (no if/then programming), but it's pretty simple to implement, and I have a lot of standard mappings I use. For example &T uppercases the line I'm on while &t lowercases it. I use &S to run my spell checker (gspell), etc. You don't need to begin your macros with an ampersand, but this way I know it's an unlikely combination of letters I'd be typing.

Setting up a Map is pretty easy. You use the :map ex command, space, a word used to invoke the map, a space, and then the keystrokes you want to execute. If you need to insert something like a return or escape, prefix it with a Ctrl-V.

You can use map! to map a macro that can be executed while in Insert or Replace mode.

share|improve this answer
1  
I know how to map keys. I am looking for help on how to pipe code from vim or basically any text editor to a running session of another program, in this case xstata. –  ilprincipe Aug 12 '11 at 17:12

Maybe you could use a mechanism similar to used by this vim plugin, which perform a similar task:

http://www.vim.org/scripts/script.php?script_id=1048

This plugin sends R code to a R tool, under unix and windows (R programming language is widely used for statistical software development and data analysis).

I don't know about Stata or R language, but it seems that you could control Stata using R, as stated in http://www.r-bloggers.com/why-use-r/ :

You can easily use it anywhere.  It's  platform-independent, so you can use it
on any operating system.  And it's free, so you can use it at any employer
without having to persuade your boss to purchase a license.
:
:
R allows you to integrate with other languages (C/C++, Java, Python) and
enables you to interact with many data sources: ODBC-compliant databases
(Excel, Access) and other statistical packages (SAS, Stata,  SPSS,
Minitab).

Some Stata commands translated to R:

http://www.r-bloggers.com/stata-or-r/

If you could perform the desired task through R then probably you could use the vim plugin above unchanged.

Hope this help.

share|improve this answer
    
I know some R, and would prefer to switch to it completely, but for some projects with my coworkers I have to use stata, and I need the gui version. The plugin uses tmux as well. Sorry, but this will not do. Also, the plugin you linked to is not supported anymore. It is now maintained and developed by a different person. This is the preferred R plugin for vim: http://www.vim.org/scripts/script.php?script_id=2628. –  ilprincipe Aug 19 '11 at 12:30
    
That script depends on support from R for the communication, i.e. on Windows it uses OLE. The question is still "is there any way to send data to xstata from the outside?" If not, you'll be stuck looking for an automation tool for X. –  dash-tom-bang Aug 20 '11 at 2:36
    
I guess it can be done in the same way the autoit script does it. It checks for an open stata window, selects it (or executes one), pastes the contents that are to be executed into a temporary file, switches to the stata window, selects the command line with ctrl-1 (and anything that might already be written there with ctrl-a) and then pastes do "tempfile" into the commandline, which then executes the code that was sent. At least thats how I understand it. –  ilprincipe Aug 20 '11 at 9:51
    
so i suspect it would have to be xautomation or something similar? –  ilprincipe Aug 20 '11 at 13:33

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