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Is there any way in C++ define a type that is big enough to hold at most a specific number, presumably using some clever template code. For example I want to be able to write :-

Integer<10000>::type dataItem;

And have that type resolve to the smallest type that is big enough to hold the specified value?

Background: I need to generate some variable defintions using a script from an external data file. I guess I could make the script look at the values and then use uint8_t, uint16_t, uint32_t, etc. depending on the value, but it seems more elegant to build the size into the generated C++ code.

I can't see any way to make a template that can do this, but knowing C++ templates, I'm sure there is a way. Any ideas?

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1  
Do you mean that dataItem should not exceed 10000 at runtime ? –  iammilind Aug 12 '11 at 10:30
8  
@iammilind: I think what JohnB means is that for example Integer<10000>::type should resolve to uint16_t because you can't store 10000 in a uint8_t but you can store it in a uint16_t. –  In silico Aug 12 '11 at 10:32
1  
@JohnB: Since you're parsing the file yourself, why not have the parser check the minimum range and write out uint8_t or uint16_t, etc? For example if you find that the value you need to write out is 10000, then the parser will figure out that it'll also need to write out uint16_t. –  In silico Aug 12 '11 at 10:39
1  
@In silico Yes I could do that, and that's likely what I'll do. It just looked elegent to do this, so I thought I'd ask if it was possible –  jcoder Aug 12 '11 at 10:41
1  
Did you not find python's simple dataItem = 1000 elegant? –  Lie Ryan Aug 12 '11 at 14:34

10 Answers 10

up vote 49 down vote accepted

Boost.Integer already has facilities for Integer Type Selection:

boost::int_max_value_t<V>::least

The smallest, built-in, signed integral type that can hold all the values in the inclusive range 0 - V. The parameter should be a positive number.

boost::uint_value_t<V>::least

The smallest, built-in, unsigned integral type that can hold all positive values up to and including V. The parameter should be a positive number.

share|improve this answer
    
Ha, so it does and I'm already using boost in the project so I guess I'll just use that! The answers to the question have all been good and very educational though :) –  jcoder Aug 12 '11 at 12:16
6  
"The Simpsons already did it" :) –  FredOverflow Aug 12 '11 at 12:18
    
+1 for taking signedness and both lower and upper bounds into account, which the OP didn't fully specify. –  hippietrail Aug 13 '11 at 7:33

Sure, it's possible. Here are the ingredients. Let's start with my two favorite meta-functions:

template<uint64_t N>
struct constant
{
    enum { value = N };
};

template<typename T>
struct return_
{
    typedef T type;
};

Then, a meta-function that counts the bits required to store a number:

template<uint64_t N>
struct bitcount : constant<1 + bitcount<(N>>1)>::value> {};

template<>
struct bitcount<0> : constant<1> {};

template<>
struct bitcount<1> : constant<1> {};

Then, a meta-function that counts the bytes:

template<uint64_t N>
struct bytecount : constant<((bitcount<N>::value + 7) >> 3)> {};

Then, a meta-function that returns the smallest type for a given number of bytes:

template<uint64_t N>
struct bytetype : return_<uint64_t> {};

template<>
struct bytetype<4> : return_<uint32_t> {};

template<>
struct bytetype<3> : return_<uint32_t> {};

template<>
struct bytetype<2> : return_<uint16_t> {};

template<>
struct bytetype<1> : return_<uint8_t> {};

And finally, the meta-function that you asked for:

template<uint64_t N>
struct Integer : bytetype<bytecount<N>::value> {};
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3  
+1. I simply loved this solution. :-) –  Nawaz Aug 12 '11 at 11:44
1  
That's one of the neatest and best explained examples of template meta programming I've ever seen :) –  jcoder Aug 12 '11 at 11:53
    
+1. very nice! :) –  Nim Aug 12 '11 at 12:34
    
Isn't this assuming magically that CHAR_BIT == 8? :-) –  Kerrek SB Aug 13 '11 at 10:43
2  
Hehe ... anyway, my real "moral issue" with many of the answers is that using fixed-width types like uint16_t somehow obviates the need for any sort of TMP: If the size of the data type is already known from the standard, independent of the platform, then we don't really need a C++ solution - the OP's preprocessor can make the correct decision right away, and the result will be the same on all platforms. I thought this would be more interesting if you want to find the fitting primitive type independent of their sizes and of CHAR_BIT... but I'm not claiming that that would be useful :-) –  Kerrek SB Aug 13 '11 at 10:49
#include <stdint.h>

template<unsigned long long Max>
struct RequiredBits
{
    enum { value =
        Max <= 0xff       ?  8 :
        Max <= 0xffff     ? 16 :
        Max <= 0xffffffff ? 32 :
                            64
    };
};

template<int bits> struct SelectInteger_;
template<> struct SelectInteger_ <8> { typedef uint8_t type; };
template<> struct SelectInteger_<16> { typedef uint16_t type; };
template<> struct SelectInteger_<32> { typedef uint32_t type; };
template<> struct SelectInteger_<64> { typedef uint64_t type; };

template<unsigned long long Max>
struct SelectInteger : SelectInteger_<RequiredBits<Max>::value> {};

int main()
{
    SelectInteger<12345>::type x = 12345;
}
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3  
Beware, 256ull * 256 * 256 * 256 * 256 * 256 * 256 * 256 is zero. –  FredOverflow Aug 12 '11 at 11:28
    
Oops, you are right. –  Maxim Yegorushkin Aug 12 '11 at 11:43
    
I fixed the bug, hope you don't mind. –  FredOverflow Aug 12 '11 at 11:58
1  
Personally, I think this is the best solution to the problem. –  FredOverflow Aug 12 '11 at 12:05
1  
Use Occam's razor. –  Maxim Yegorushkin Aug 12 '11 at 13:50

Do you necessarily want the smallest, as opposed to using int for types smaller than int?

If not, and your compiler supports it, could you do:

int main()
{
    typeof('A') i_65 = 0; // declare variable 'i_65' of type 'char'
    typeof(10) i_10 = 0; // int
    typeof(10000) i_10000 = 0; // int
    typeof(1000000000000LL) i_1000000000000 = 0; // int 64
}
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Beautiful. The question is tagged C++ but this should also be accepted by any C compiler that accepts typeof. –  Pascal Cuoq Aug 13 '11 at 21:43

How about a conditional:

#include <type_traits>
#include <limits>

template <unsigned long int N>
struct MinInt
{
  typedef typename std::conditional< N < std::numeric_limits<unsigned char>::max(),
       unsigned char, std::conditional< N < std::numeric_limits<unsigned short int>::max(),
         unsigned short int>::type,
         void*>::type>::type
    type;
};

This would have to be extended to encompass all desired types, in order; at the final stage you could use enable_if rather than conditional to have an instantiation error right there if the value is too large.

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It will not work. std::numeric_limits<unsigned char>::max() is a function, which will be executed at runtime, while the std::conditional needs value at compile time. –  Nawaz Aug 12 '11 at 10:47
    
@Nawaz: Isn't that a constexpr? If not, use T(-1) instead. –  Kerrek SB Aug 12 '11 at 10:48
    
I don't recognize std::conditional. Is it c++0x? –  jcoder Aug 12 '11 at 10:55
    
@JohnB: Yeah, but it's in TR1 as well, and you can trivially write it yourself, too - it's just the template version of the ternary ?:. –  Kerrek SB Aug 12 '11 at 11:03
    
max is indeed constexpr. –  Luc Danton Aug 12 '11 at 11:32
#include <stdio.h>

#ifdef _MSC_VER
typedef unsigned __int8 uint8_t;
typedef unsigned __int16 uint16_t;
typedef unsigned __int32 uint32_t;
typedef unsigned __int64 uint64_t;
#else
#include <stdint.h> // i dunno
#endif

template <class T> struct Printer       { static void print()   { printf("uint64_t\n"); } };
template <> struct Printer<uint32_t>    { static void print()   { printf("uint32_t\n"); } };
template <> struct Printer<uint16_t>    { static void print()   { printf("uint16_t\n"); } };
template <> struct Printer<uint8_t>     { static void print()   { printf("uint8_t\n"); } };

//-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

template <long long N> struct Pick32 { typedef uint64_t type; };
template <> struct Pick32<0> { typedef uint32_t type; };

template <long long N> struct Pick16 { typedef typename Pick32<(N>>16)>::type type; };
template <> struct Pick16<0> { typedef uint16_t type; };

template <long long N> struct Pick8 { typedef typename Pick16<(N>>8)>::type type; };
template <> struct Pick8<0> { typedef uint8_t type; };

template <long long N> struct Integer
{
    typedef typename Pick8<(N>>8)>::type type;
};


int main()
{
    Printer< Integer<0ull>::type >::print(); // uint8_t
    Printer< Integer<255ull>::type >::print(); // uint8_t

    Printer< Integer<256ull>::type >::print(); // uint16_t
    Printer< Integer<65535ull>::type >::print(); // uint16_t

    Printer< Integer<65536ull>::type >::print(); // uint32_t
    Printer< Integer<0xFFFFFFFFull>::type >::print(); // uint32_t

    Printer< Integer<0x100000000ULL>::type >::print(); // uint64_t
    Printer< Integer<1823465835443ULL>::type >::print(); // uint64_t
}
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I think it should pick the smallest type which would hold the given integer:

class true_type {};
class false_type {};

template<bool> 
struct bool2type 
{ 
  typedef true_type  type; 
};

template<>
struct bool2type<false>
{
  typedef false_type  type;
};

template<int M, int L, int H>
struct within_range
{
   static const bool value = L <= M && M <=H;
   typedef typename bool2type<value>::type type;
};

template<int M, class booltype> 
struct IntegerType;

template<int Max> 
struct IntegerType<Max,typename within_range<Max, 0, 127>::type >
{
   typedef char type;
};

template<int Max> 
struct IntegerType<Max,typename within_range<Max, 128, 32767>::type >
{
   typedef short type;
};

template<int Max> 
struct IntegerType<Max,typename within_range<Max, 32768, INT_MAX>::type >
{
   typedef int type;
};

template <int Max>
struct Integer {
    typedef typename IntegerType<Max, true_type>::type type;
};

Test code:

int main() {
        cout << typeid(Integer<122>::type).name() << endl;
        cout << typeid(Integer<1798>::type).name() << endl;
        cout << typeid(Integer<890908>::type).name() << endl;
        return 0;
}

Output: (c=char, s=short, i=int - due to name mangling)

c
s
i

Demo : http://www.ideone.com/diALB

Note: of course, I'm assuming the size and the range of the types, and even despite of this I might have choosen the wrong range; if so, then providing the correct range to the within_range class template, one can pick smallest type for a given integer.

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You mean something along the lines of:

template <int MAX>
struct Integer {
    typedef typename Integer<MAX+1>::type type;
};

template <>
struct Integer<2147483647> {
    typedef int32_t type;
};

template <>
struct Integer<32767> {
    typedef int16_t type;
};

template <>
struct Integer<127> {
    typedef int8_t type;
};

And maybe another templated struct for UnsignedInteger.

You could maybe even use numeric_limits instead of the hard coded values.

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I want it to work for any number though, not just the ones I programmed explicit specializations for. –  jcoder Aug 12 '11 at 10:37
5  
Hmm, good answer, but that looks like a recipe for hitting the compiler's template recursion limit. :) –  Dark Falcon Aug 12 '11 at 10:37
    
@JohnB: That does work for any number. –  Dark Falcon Aug 12 '11 at 10:38
    
That may idea be improved to work, though, by using some conditionals... –  Kerrek SB Aug 12 '11 at 10:39
2  
Much quicker: typedef typename Integer<MAX | (MAX >> 1) | (MAX >> 4) | (MAX >> 16)>::type type;. This will quickly fill out bits to the right. –  MSalters Aug 12 '11 at 10:44

Here we go, for unsigned types:

#include <stdint.h>
#include <typeinfo>
#include <iostream>

template <uint64_t N>
struct Integer {
    static const uint64_t S1 = N | (N>>1);
    static const uint64_t S2 = S1 | (S1>>2);
    static const uint64_t S4 = S2 | (S2>>4);
    static const uint64_t S8 = S4 | (S4>>8);
    static const uint64_t S16 = S8 | (S8>>16);
    static const uint64_t S32 = S16 | (S16>>32);
    typedef typename Integer<(S32+1)/4>::type type;
};

template <> struct Integer<0> {
    typedef uint8_t type;
};

template <> struct Integer<1> {
    typedef uint8_t type;
};

template <> struct Integer<256> {
    typedef uint16_t type;
};

template <> struct Integer<65536> {
    typedef uint32_t type;
};

template <> struct Integer<4294967296LL> {
    typedef uint64_t type;
};

int main() {
    std::cout << 8 << " " << typeid(uint8_t).name() << "\n";
    std::cout << 16 << " " << typeid(uint16_t).name() << "\n";
    std::cout << 32 << " " << typeid(uint32_t).name() << "\n";
    std::cout << 64 << " " << typeid(uint64_t).name() << "\n";
    Integer<1000000>::type i = 12;
    std::cout << typeid(i).name() << "\n";
    Integer<10000000000LL>::type j = 12;
    std::cout << typeid(j).name() << "\n";
}

Note that this doesn't necessarily pick the smallest applicable type, since there's nothing in principle to stop an implementation from having a 24 bit integer. But for "normal" implementations it's OK, and to include unusual sizes all you need to do to fix it is to change the list of specializations.

For implementations that don't have a 64-bit type at all you need to change the type of the template parameter N - or you could use uintmax_t. Also in the case the right shift by 32 might be dodgy.

For implementations that have a type bigger than uint64_t, there's trouble too.

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That looks good, and simple now I see how :) –  jcoder Aug 12 '11 at 10:53
1  
You'll never reach 65536 with (N+1)/2 starting from 1000000. It does not work. –  Didier Trosset Aug 12 '11 at 10:55
    
@Steve: I would like to hear your comment on my solution. :-) –  Nawaz Aug 12 '11 at 11:07
1  
@Didier: good point, fixed I think. There may be a more elegant fix. –  Steve Jessop Aug 12 '11 at 11:25
#define UINT8_T   256
#define UINT16_T  65536
#define UINT32_T  4294967296

template<uint64_t RANGE, bool = (RANGE < UINT16_T)>
struct UInt16_t { typedef uint16_t type; };
template<uint64_t RANGE>
struct UInt16_t<RANGE, false> { typedef uint32_t type; };

template<uint64_t RANGE, bool = (RANGE < UINT8_T)>
struct UInt8_t { typedef uint8_t type; };
template<uint64_t RANGE>
struct UInt8_t<RANGE, false> { typedef typename UInt16_t<RANGE>::type type; };

template<uint64_t RANGE>
struct Integer {
  typedef typename UInt8_t<RANGE>::type type;
};

You can extend upto uint64_t or whatever your platform supports.

Demo.

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