Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Here's my code:

struct RS_Token
{
    char id;
    char cleanup;
    unsigned char array[sizeof (std::string) > sizeof (double) ? sizeof (std::string) : sizeof (double)];

    RS_Token(int a) :
        id(a),
        cleanup(0)
    {
    }
    RS_Token(int a, const char* pstr) : // identifier or text
        id(a),
        cleanup(1)
    {
        new (array) std::basic_string<unsigned char>((unsigned char*)pstr);
    }
    RS_Token(int a, int b) : // integer
        id(a),
        cleanup(0)
    {
        new (array) int(b);
    }
    RS_Token(int a, double b) : // float (double)
        id(a),
        cleanup(0)
    {
        new (array) double(b);
    }

    ~RS_Token()
    {
        if (cleanup)
        {
            std::basic_string<unsigned char>* p = reinterpret_cast<std::basic_string<unsigned char>*>(array);

            p->~basic_string();
        }
    }
};

Any suggestions on how to add a copy constructor that properly handles the case where a std::string has been allocated internally, would be appreciated.

share|improve this question
4  
What's wrong with making separate std::string and double variables? The code you have is going to have serious alignment issues among other things. And if you make them separate member variables, the compiler-generated copy constructor will do the right thing for you. –  In silico Aug 12 '11 at 10:53
    
Placement-new usually takes a void* argument, so you can spare yourself those tedious casts. –  Kerrek SB Aug 12 '11 at 10:53
    
Probably boost::variant<string, double> would take care of these things. –  visitor Aug 12 '11 at 11:48
    
Why is id sometimes a char and sometimes an int? –  Mooing Duck Sep 22 '11 at 23:21
    
Can you be more specific about the alignment issues? –  Truncheon Jan 9 '12 at 19:10

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I'm not sure that what you're doing is at all a good design, but to answer your question about placement-new: You provide the constructor arguments just like in any other new expression:

Construct new string:

typedef std::basic_string<unsigned char> ustring;

RS_Token(const char* pstr)
{
  void * p = static_cast<void*>(array);
  new (p) ustring(pstr, pstr + std::strlen(pstr));
}

Copy-construct:

RS_Token(const RS_Token & other)
{
  void * p = static_cast<void*>(array);
  new (p) ustring(*reinterpret_cast<const ustring *>(other.array));
}

Assign:

RS_Token & operator=(const RS_Token & other)
{
  ustring & s = *reinterpret_cast<ustring *>(array);
  s = *reinterpret_cast<const ustring *>(other.array);
  return this;
}
share|improve this answer
    
That copy constructor only works if the other contains a string, and the assignment operator assumes that both are already a string. They'll need to be quite a bit more complicated than that. –  Mooing Duck Sep 22 '11 at 23:03
    
@Moo: Ah, yes, a good amount of the variant logic has to be added here. But the answer concerns handling the placement construction, so I hope the OP can integrate that into her class code. –  Kerrek SB Sep 22 '11 at 23:05
    
eh, true enough. You got all the hard parts. The rest should be fairly obvious. –  Mooing Duck Sep 22 '11 at 23:20

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.