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I was experimenting with some examples and came across a problem that if we want to add a function to a prototype it will not be able to access the private members of the constructor. I came across this solution. This seems to be a nice hack.

I tried out some other ways and I got the following:

var Restaurant = function()
{
    var myPrivateVar;
    var private_stuff = function()   // Only visible inside Restaurant()
    {
        return "I can set this here!";
    }
    Restaurant.prototype.use_restroom = function()   // use_restroom is visible to all
    {
        private_stuff();
    }
    Restaurant.prototype.buy_food = function()    // buy_food is visible to all
    {
        return private_stuff();
    }
}
var restaurant = new Restaurant();
restaurant.buy_food(); // this would work
restaurant.private_stuff(); // this won't

The solution seems weird because we are adding to the prototype within the constructor function. (I haven't seen much of this). It works on firefox 5 and chrome at least. Is there something wrong with it?

share|improve this question
up vote 11 down vote accepted

What you're doing is redefining those methods on the prototype every time you make a new restaurant object. The more sane way to do that would be to define them on this, which is the new object being constructed in a constructor:

var Restaurant = function()
{
    var myPrivateVar;
    var private_stuff = function()   // Only visible inside Restaurant()
    {
        return "I can set this here!";
    }
    this.use_restroom = function()   // use_restroom is visible to all
    {
        private_stuff();
    }
    this.buy_food = function()    // buy_food is visible to all
    {
        return private_stuff();
    }
}

You could just do it like this though, and not use new:

var RestaurantMaker = function () {
  var myPrivateVar;
  var private_stuff = function() {
    return "I can set this here!";
  }

  return {
    use_restroom: function () {
      private_stuff();
    },
    buy_food: function () {
      return private_stuff();
    }
  };
}

and then just do:

var restaurant = RestaurantMaker();

This is called the revealing module pattern. The downside is that each new object gets a copy of all the functions, which also happens if you add methods to this in your constructor.

A very small alternative version of the revealing module pattern (which I think reads a bit better) looks like this:

var RestaurantMaker = function () {
  var myPrivateVar;

  function private_stuff() {
    return "I can set this here!";
  }

  function use_restroom() {
    private_stuff();
  }

  function buy_food() {
    return private_stuff();
  }

  return {
    use_restroom: use_restroom,
    buy_food: buy_food
  };
}

Then, if you want to change whether a function is private or not, it's just a matter of adding or removing it from the returned object.

share|improve this answer
1  
thanks for the nice explanation and the comments. I totally missed the point that I am redefining the methods in prototype every time I create an object. I had a look at the modular pattern earlier. But problem that I was facing was that every time I call the restaurantMaker I'll get new instances of use_restroom and buy_food. Which is not needed i.e. they could have been shared if they could be added to the prototype. – aditya_gaur Aug 12 '11 at 11:32
    
The problem is, a function can only have access to private variables if it's defined in the same scope as those private variables. So if you're only defining the functions once, they'll either all have to share the same private variables, or they won't have access. It's only really a problem if you end up have 100s of restaurant objects though. – Skilldrick Aug 12 '11 at 11:35

I didn't actually test this, but I think all the objects would access to the last instantiated object's private properties.

On each instantiation you're binding the prototype methods (shared across all instances) to the private variables of the object being instantiated :)

share|improve this answer

Honestly, it doesn't make a lot of sense to me. Sure, you can have calls to your private functions this way, but it doesn't solve the initial problem - that is, you still need to add methods inside the constructor.

If you want to add methods to the class outside the constructor, you can use closures to keep constructors clean:

// Creating a closure inside a self-calling function
var Restaurant = (function() {

    // Only visible inside this closure
    var myPrivateVar;
    var private_stuff = function() {
        return "I can set this here!";
    }

    var Restaurant = function() {};

    // use_restroom is visible to all
    Restaurant.prototype.use_restroom = function() {
        private_stuff();
    };

    // buy_food is visible to all
    Restaurant.prototype.buy_food = function() {
        return private_stuff();
    };

    // We give back the Restaurant-constructor to the people
    return Restaurant;

})();

var restaurant = new Restaurant();
restaurant.buy_food(); // this would work
restaurant.private_stuff(); // this won't
share|improve this answer
1  
Instead of defining Restaurant in the global scope and then assigning to it, you could just say window.Restaurant inside the closure. – Skilldrick Aug 12 '11 at 11:02
    
Yes, you're right, it can even be returned from the self-calling function, so it can be assigned to whatever variable. – Igor Zinov'yev Aug 12 '11 at 11:06
2  
The problem here is that all instances of Restaurant will share the same privateVar, which may or may not be what the OP was after. – Skilldrick Aug 12 '11 at 11:10
    
I modified it the way LiveScript does it, in their "Classes" – yckart Jan 19 '14 at 12:28

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