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I am currently developing a very simple web service and thought I could write an API for that so when I decide to expand it on new platforms I would only have to code the parser application. That said, the API isn't meant for other developers but me, but I won't restrict access to it so anyone can build on that.

Then I thought I could even run the website itself through this API for various reasons like lower bandwidth consumption (HTML generated in browser) and client-side caching. Being AJAX heavy seemed like an even bigger reason to.

The layout looks like this:

Server (database, programming logic)
|
API (handles user reads/writes)
|
Client application (the website, browser extensions, desktop app, mobile apps)
|
Client cache (further reduces server reads)

After the introduction here are my questions:

  1. Is this good use of API
  2. Is it a good idea to run the whole website through the API
  3. What choices for safe authentication do I have, using the API (and for some reason I prefer not to use HTTPS)

EDIT

Additional questions:

  1. Any alternative approaches I haven't considered
  2. What are some potential issues I haven't accounted for that may arise using this approach
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2 Answers 2

up vote 14 down vote accepted
+25

First things first.

Asking if a design (or in fact anything) is "good" depends on how you define "goodness". Typical criteria are performance, maintainability, scalability, testability, reusability etc. It would help if you could add some of that context.

Having said that...

Is this good use of API

It's usually a good idea to separate out your business logic from your presentation logic and your data persistence logic. Your design does that, and therefore I'd be happy to call it "good". You might look at a formal design pattern to do this - Model View Controller is probably the current default, esp. for web applications.

Is it a good idea to run the whole website through the API

Well, that depends on the application. It's totally possible to write an application entirely in Javascript/Ajax, but there are browser compatibility issues (esp. for older browsers), and you have to build support for things users commonly expect from web applications, like deep links and search engine friendliness. If you have a well-factored API, you can do some of the page generation on the server, if that makes it easier.

What choices for safe authentication do I have, using the API (and for some reason I prefer not to use HTTPS)

Tricky one - with this kind of app, you have to distinguish between authenticating the user, and authenticating the application. For the former, OpenID or OAuth are probably the dominant solutions; for the latter, have a look at how Google requires you to sign up to use their Maps API.

In most web applications, HTTPS is not used for authentication (proving the current user is who they say they are), but for encryption. The two are related, but by no means equivalent...

Any alternative approaches I haven't considered

Maybe this fits more under question 5 - but in my experience, API design is a rather esoteric skill - it's hard for an API designer to be able to predict exactly what the client of the API is going to need. I would seriously consider writing the application without an API for your first client platform, and factor out the API later - that way, you build only what you need in the first release.

What are some potential issues I haven't accounted for that may arise using this approach

Versioning is a big deal with APIs - once you've created an interface, you can almost never change it, especially with multiple clients that you don't control. I'd build versioning in as a first class concept - with RESTful APIs, you can do this as part of the URL.

share|improve this answer
    
Hey thanks for the great answer! I don't care for older browsers and search engines as the whole website is an index with login and from there users don't see each other's information (and most likely wouldn't want their information seen too - especially search engines). As for the authentication I was mostly wondering about how to maintain identification with the user. I was thinking - user logins > server gives him his session id > user sends his SID every time he contacts the server. Or maybe server sends some string, user replies with another according to some rules, and so on. –  Alexander Ivanov Aug 31 '11 at 10:15
  1. Is this good use of API

    Depends on what you will do with that application.

  2. Is it a good idea to run the whole website through the API

    no, so your site will be accessible only through your application. this way This implementation prevents compatibility with other browsers

  3. What choices for safe authentication do I have, using the API (and for some reason I prefer not to use HTTPS)

    You can use omniauth

  4. Any alternative approaches I haven't considered

    create both frontends, one in your application and other in common browsers

  5. What are some potential issues I haven't accounted for that may arise using this approach

    I don't now your idea, but I can't see major danger.

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2  
2. How is this a compatibility issue? If I make a cross-browser compatible web application over my API it should be OK. My whole idea is to serve a basic page with a API parser implemented in JS using AJAX to run the site. This way the site won't be integrated to the server and if somebody likes they can make a site on their server which runs through my API. The whole point is that this approach will still work if you save the webpage and with caching it can even work offline. –  Alexander Ivanov Aug 17 '11 at 14:56
    
3. Any other way I can do authentication? I would like to do it on my server and not use third-party services. –  Alexander Ivanov Aug 17 '11 at 15:14
    
2. you are going to create only one webpage to control any request?? this is not good. if you will create every page with ajax, why don`t you let the user call that page statically? its easy for him (only one worker to process) and for you (only one access to your server) –  Nicos Karalis Aug 17 '11 at 17:26
    
3. OAuth is not a third-party, it is a design pattern for authentication, it is a great way to use api. take a look at twitter Authentication: you have one token and one toke-secret, and the server do the calculations to authenticate, i can`t explain the oauth better, but it is better then plain authentication because you don`t send the password via post or get (witch we can retrieve this details), and you can create your own authentication using oauth as base. –  Nicos Karalis Aug 17 '11 at 17:31
    
if you still don`t see the good in oauth check here: OAuth explained and don`t try to use some libraries, try to implement it, it is easy and you can find many useful links –  Nicos Karalis Aug 17 '11 at 17:32

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