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I want to iterate over a list of files. This list is the result of a find command, so I came up with:

getlist() {
  for f in $(find . -iname "foo*")
  do
    echo "File found: $f"
    # do something useful
  done
}

It's fine except if a file has spaces in its name:

$ ls
foo_bar_baz.txt
foo bar baz.txt

$ getlist
File found: foo_bar_baz.txt
File found: foo
File found: bar
File found: baz.txt

How can I do to avoid the split on spaces ?

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up vote 93 down vote accepted

You could replace the word-based iteration with a line-based one:

find . -iname "foo*" | while read f
do
    # ... loop body
done
share|improve this answer
13  
This is extremely clean. And makes me feel nicer than changing IFS in conjunction with a for loop – Derrick Aug 18 '11 at 4:13
12  
This will split a single file path that contains a \n. OK, those shouldn’t be around but they can be created: touch "$(printf "foo\nbar")" – Ollie Saunders Oct 17 '13 at 5:14
1  
@OllieSaunders: it's always something! – Bob Jarvis Oct 28 '15 at 12:23
    
To prevent any interpretation of the input (backslashes, leading and trailing whitespace), use IFS= while read -r f instead. – mklement0 Apr 2 at 17:26

There are several workable ways to accomplish this.

If you wanted to stick closely to your original version it could be done this way:

getlist() {
        IFS=$'\n'
        for file in $(find . -iname 'foo*') ; do
                printf 'File found: %s\n' "$file"
        done
}

This will still fail if file names have literal newlines in them, but spaces will not break it.

However, messing with IFS isn't necessary. Here's my preferred way to do this:

getlist() {
    while IFS= read -d $'\0' -r file ; do
            printf 'File found: %s\n' "$file"
    done < <(find . -iname 'foo*' -print0)
}

If you find the < <(command) syntax unfamiliar you should read about process substitution. The advantage of this over for file in $(find ...) is that files with spaces, newlines and other characters are correctly handled. This works because find with -print0 will use a null (aka \0) as the terminator for each file name and, unlike newline, null is not a legal character in a file name.

The advantage to this over the nearly-equivalent version

getlist() {
        find . -iname 'foo*' -print0 | while read -d $'\0' -r file ; do
                printf 'File found: %s\n' "$file"
        done
}

Is that any variable assignment in the body of the while loop is preserved. That is, if you pipe to while as above then the body of the while is in a subshell which may not be what you want.

The advantage of the process substitution version over find ... -print0 | xargs -0 is minimal: The xargs version is fine if all you need is to print a line or perform a single operation on the file, but if you need to perform multiple steps the loop version is easier.

EDIT: Here's a nice test script so you can get an idea of the difference between different attempts at solving this problem

#!/usr/bin/env bash

dir=/tmp/getlist.test/
mkdir -p "$dir"
cd "$dir"

touch       'file not starting foo' foo foobar barfoo 'foo with spaces'\
    'foo with'$'\n'newline 'foo with trailing whitespace      '

# while with process substitution, null terminated, empty IFS
getlist0() {
    while IFS= read -d $'\0' -r file ; do
            printf 'File found: '"'%s'"'\n' "$file"
    done < <(find . -iname 'foo*' -print0)
}

# while with process substitution, null terminated, default IFS
getlist1() {
    while read -d $'\0' -r file ; do
            printf 'File found: '"'%s'"'\n' "$file"
    done < <(find . -iname 'foo*' -print0)
}

# pipe to while, newline terminated
getlist2() {
    find . -iname 'foo*' | while read -r file ; do
            printf 'File found: '"'%s'"'\n' "$file"
    done
}

# pipe to while, null terminated
getlist3() {
    find . -iname 'foo*' -print0 | while read -d $'\0' -r file ; do
            printf 'File found: '"'%s'"'\n' "$file"
    done
}

# for loop over subshell results, newline terminated, default IFS
getlist4() {
    for file in "$(find . -iname 'foo*')" ; do
            printf 'File found: '"'%s'"'\n' "$file"
    done
}

# for loop over subshell results, newline terminated, newline IFS
getlist5() {
    IFS=$'\n'
    for file in $(find . -iname 'foo*') ; do
            printf 'File found: '"'%s'"'\n' "$file"
    done
}


# see how they run
for n in {0..5} ; do
    printf '\n\ngetlist%d:\n' $n
    eval getlist$n
done

rm -rf "$dir"
share|improve this answer
1  
Accepted your answer: the most complete and interesting -- I didn't knew about $IFS and the < <(cmd) syntax. Still one thing remains obscure to me, why the $ in $'\0'? Thanks a lot. – gregseth Aug 12 '11 at 12:05
    
@gregseth: This is bash syntax for a literal escape character. For example, if you say CTRL+V and then hit TAB you insert a literal tab. This won't look right when copied and pasted elsewhere, however, but the syntax $'\t' will be evaluated as a tab and works the same way. It's just a convenient way to pass certain characters to commands without worrying about the shell mangling them. – Sorpigal Aug 12 '11 at 13:05
2  
+1, but you should add ...while IFS= read... to handle files that start or end with whitespace. – Gordon Davisson Aug 12 '11 at 14:55
1  
There is one caveat to the process substitution solution. If you have any prompt inside the loop (or are reading from STDIN in any other way), the input will be filled by the stuff you feed into the loop. (maybe this should be added to the answer?) – andsens Dec 12 '13 at 18:39
1  
@uvsmtid: This question was tagged bash so I felt safe using bash-specific features. Process substitution is not portable to other shells (sh itself is not likely to ever receive such a significant update). – Sorpigal Nov 28 '15 at 13:48
find . -iname "foo*" -print0 | xargs -L1 -0 echo "File found:"
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5  
as a side note, this will only work if you want to execute a command. A shell builtin will not work this way. – Alex Feb 27 '15 at 14:52
find . -name "fo*" -print0 | xargs -0 ls -l

See man xargs.

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There is also a very simple solution: rely on bash globbing

$ mkdir test
$ cd test
$ touch "stupid file1"
$ touch "stupid file2"
$ touch "stupid   file 3"
$ ls
stupid   file 3  stupid file1     stupid file2
$ for file in *; do echo "file: '${file}'"; done
file: 'stupid   file 3'
file: 'stupid file1'
file: 'stupid file2'

Note that I am not sure this behavior is the default one but I don't see any special setting in my shopt so I would go and say that it should be "safe" (tested on osx and ubuntu).

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The "${file}" syntax worked wonders for me. – Chad von Nau Aug 10 '14 at 2:44
1  
Best answer! This seems much more concise than other multi-command attempts. – Matt Warren Nov 20 '14 at 16:37
1  
Simple and clean. I'd give it two upvotes if I could. – Bob Jarvis Oct 28 '15 at 12:32

Since you aren't doing any other type of filtering with find, you can use the following as of bash 4.0:

shopt -s globstar
getlist() {
    for f in **/foo*
    do
        echo "File found: $f"
        # do something useful
    done
}

The **/ will match zero or more directories, so the full pattern will match foo* in the current directory or any subdirectories.

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In some cases, here if you just need to copy or move a list of files, you could pipe that list to awk as well.
Important the \"" "\" around the field $0 (in short your files, one line-list = one file).

find . -iname "foo*" | awk '{print "mv \""$0"\" ./MyDir2" | "sh" }'
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The pain of trying to do these things in Bash is one of the reasons we built Crab: full disclosure I'm the lead developer.

You don't have to write loops, do anything fancy with spaces or control characters. Just scan the part of the filesystem that has your files,

crab ~/mydirectory

Then run a select statement to find the files you want,

SELECT fullpath FROM files WHERE name like 'foo%';

And use the exec function to run a command on the files you found

SELECT exec('printf', fullpath) FROM files WHERE name like 'foo%';

For example to unzip all the zip files

SELECT exec('unzip','-uo',fullpath,'-d','/blah/targetdirectory') FROM files 
WHERE extension = '.zip';

It's a paid product, but not very expensive http://www.etia.co.uk

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