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I want to create an object with a constructor containing predicate and func objects in the xml config using spring. The Predicate and the Func arguments should point to a method of another configured object. How is this possible using Spring.net? I was not able to find a solution or hint in the documentation...

A sample constructor would be:

MyClass(Predicate<TInput> condition, Func<TInput, TOutput> result)
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3 Answers 3

I would say you have to extract the predicate and the function and put them behind an interface. Then you can use this interface in your constructor. If your using constructor injection most of the times you specify the dependencies as interfaces or types. The constructor in your example uses 2 instance variables (in this case pointing to a method).

You could create an interface like this:

public interface IInterface<TInput, TOutput>
{
    bool GetOutput(TInput item);
    TOutput GetResult(TInput item);
}

And use this interface as constructor param, which gives you the exact same result as you can have your 'other configured object' implement this interface.

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This seems to be an option, but this requires a definition of an extra interface where no interface should be needed. In addition this is not a straight forward solution and adds more complexity instead. I just want to use a delegate/method (pointer) in constructor/property injection. It is very easy to wire this in the code but I have no idea how this would work in spring. –  Beachwalker Aug 13 '11 at 16:43
1  
What do you mean by it's not needed? Having an interface describing a dependency is far better than just having a function. You should use the interface to describe what the dependency is and what the function is doing rather than just calling a function which is injected and you have no knowledge from at all. The interface makes the abstraction clear and tells you what the dependency is. –  thekip Aug 13 '11 at 16:47
    
... using an interface this way would not solve the problem. "how to define" the func parameter in spring. This gives you the option to create a class which has an object as constructor argument and the Get*-Methods can return something. This code will invade the implementation of the strategy. –  Beachwalker Aug 15 '11 at 8:08

It is also possible to use the DelegateFactoryObject within Spring.net to create delegates (Action, Func, Predicate are only special delegates):

  <object type="Spring.Objects.Factory.Config.DelegateFactoryObject, Spring.Core">
    <property name="DelegateType" value="System.Action"/>
    <property name="TargetObject" ref="MyTarget" />
    <property name="MethodName" value="MyDelegate" />
  </object>

So you're not forced to create a construct such the MySpringConfigurationDelegateObjectContainer mentioned above to forward the delegates through factory methods anymore.

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

I solved the problem using an intermediate "factory" inspired by the suggestion of thekip but leaving the object requiring the predicate and func in the constructor (MyClass in the example above) untouched. This solution keeps the "problem" of handling delegates in spring outside of the implementation of MyClass (in opposite of the suggestion of thekip, but thanks for your answer).

Here is my way to configure such a situation (setting delegates in Spring.Net, using object based factory pattern).

The MyDelegator class a sample implementation for predicate/func to use (object here, but could be anything else fitting to the predicate/func params):

public class MyDelegator
{
    // for the predicate Predicate<TInput> condition, implemented with object
    public bool Condition(object input) 
    {
        ...
    }

    //for the Func<TInput, TOutput> result, implemented with object
    public object Evaluate(object input) 
    {
        ...
    }
}

... then you need a container for the object with the predicate and or func (could be in seperate classes, too) ...

public class MySpringConfigurationDelegateObjectContainer
{
    private readonly Predicate<object> condition;
    private readonly Func<object, object> evaluate;

    public MySpringConfigurationDelegateObjectContainer(MyDelegator strategy)
    {
        condition = strategy.Condition;
        evaluate = strategy.Evaluate;
    }

    public Predicate<object> GetConditionMethod()
    {
        return condition;
    }

    public Func<object, object> GetEvaluateMethod()
    {
        return evaluate;
    }
}

... and this can be configured in Spring.Net xml this way

  <!-- a simple container class, just has the object with the method to call -->
  <object id="Container" type="MySpringConfigurationDelegateObjectContainer">
    <constructor-arg name="myDelegateObject">
      <!-- put the object with the delegate/func/predicate here -->
      <object type="MyDelegator" />
    </constructor-arg>
  </object>

And now you can use this anywhere in your config for objects with predicate/func (no need to change the class requiring the predicate/func)

  <object id="NeedAPredicateAndFuncInConstructor" type="...">
    ...
    <constructor-arg name="condition">
      <object factory-method="GetConditionMethod" factory-object="Container" />
    </constructor-arg>
    <constructor-arg name="result">
      <object factory-method="GetEvaluateMethod" factory-object="Container" />
    </constructor-arg>
    ...
  </object>

That's it. Any suggestions to improve this solution? Maybe, Spring.net already has a generic solution for this...

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ouch.. I'm currently looking for similar thing - generic support for spring-based factories using Func<TService>, but as your answer shows the only good solution for these advanced scenarios in Spring is to get rid of Spring as soon as possible and start to use some real container (ie. Windsor) :) –  Buthrakaur May 14 '12 at 6:43
    
@Buthrakaur Hopefully Spring.net will have support for this in the future... and maybe there is another way to solve this using expressions in spring.net –  Beachwalker Aug 28 '12 at 15:12

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