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How to check how many locales are supported by my JVM? Is there a some method to do it or something else?
Thanks

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Please be aware that even though you can get the list of "available" locales, as Logan said, some of them offer only partial support, for example some translations are missing. –  Paweł Dyda Aug 12 '11 at 20:35

2 Answers 2

You can check the locales by using Locale.getAvailableLocales(); method.

Code

import java.util.Arrays;
import java.util.Locale;

import javax.swing.table.*;
import javax.swing.*;

class ShowLocales {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        SwingUtilities.invokeLater(new Runnable() {
            public void run() {
                Locale[] locales = Locale.getAvailableLocales();
                LocaleTableModel tableModel = new LocaleTableModel(locales);
                JTable localeTable = new JTable(tableModel);
                localeTable.setAutoCreateRowSorter(true);
                JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(
                    null, 
                    new JScrollPane(localeTable));
            }
        });
    }
}

class LocaleTableModel extends AbstractTableModel {

    private Locale[] locales;

    LocaleTableModel(Locale[] locales) {
        this.locales = locales;
    }

    public String getColumnName(int column) {
        switch (column) {
            case 0:
                return "Code";
            case 1:
                return "Language";
            case 2:
                return "Country";
            case 3:
                return "Variant";
        }
        return "";
    }

    public Object getValueAt(int row, int column) {
        switch (column) {
            case 0:
                return locales[row].toString();
            case 1:
                return locales[row].getDisplayLanguage();
            case 2:
                return locales[row].getDisplayCountry();
            case 3:
                return locales[row].getDisplayVariant();
        }
        return null;
    }

    public int getRowCount() {
        return locales.length;
    }

    public int getColumnCount() {
        return 4;
    }
}

E.G.

Some locales known to JVM

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1  
Gee I was gonna' say that! Guess I'll have to settle for up-voting & adding code and a screenshot. ;) –  Andrew Thompson Aug 12 '11 at 12:32
1  
@Andrew: Thanks for the Extra Effects. –  Logan Aug 12 '11 at 12:36

See: http://java.sun.com/developer/technicalArticles/J2SE/locale/

What locales does the Java platform support? You can create any locale that you'd like. However, your runtime environment may not fully support the Locale object you create.

If you want to know what Locale objects you can create, the answer is simple: You can create any locale you'd like. The constructors won't complain about non-ISO arguments. However, a more helpful restatement of the question is this: For which locales do the class libraries provide more extensive information? For which locales can the libraries provide collation, time, date, number, and currency information? Also, you might ask what scripts or writing systems your runtime environment supports.

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