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I have a javscript function (actually a jQuery plugin) which I will want to call as either

myFunction("some input");

or

myFunction({ "prop": "value 1", "prop2": "value2" });

How do I, in the function, tell the two apart?

In other words, what should go in the if conditions below?

if (/* the input is a string */)
{
    // Handle string case (first of above)
}
else if (/* the input is an object */)
{
    // Handle object case (second of above)
}
else
{
    // Handle invalid input format
}

I have jQuery at my disposal.

Update: As noted in an answer, if the input is new String('some string'), typeof(input) will return 'object'. How do I test for new String(''), so I can handle that the same way as ''?

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If it is sufficient for you, you could use jQuery.isPlainObject: api.jquery.com/jQuery.isPlainObject –  Felix Kling Aug 12 '11 at 11:49
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9 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

jQuery.type may be interesting to you.

if($.type(input)==='string')
{
   //it's a string
}
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This seems to take care of all the caveats mentioned in other answers, so far at least. –  Tomas Lycken Aug 12 '11 at 12:09
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if( typeof input === 'string' ) {
    // input is a string
}
else if( typeof input === 'object' ) {
    // input is an object
}
else {
    // input is something else
}

Note that typeof considers also arrays and null to be objects:

typeof null === 'object'
typeof [ 1, 2 ] === 'object'

If the distinction is important (you want only "actual" objects):

if( typeof input === 'string' ) {
    // input is a string
}
else if( input && typeof input === 'object' && !( input instanceof Array ) ) {
    // input is an object
}
else {
    // input is something else
}
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+1 for the note about input != null, even though I'm not sure I have to care in this case. What does undefined return? –  Tomas Lycken Aug 12 '11 at 12:07
    
typeof doesntExist == 'undefined', although you can just do if( input == undefined ) –  Juhana Aug 12 '11 at 12:09
    
True - I was making weird circles in my head :P –  Tomas Lycken Aug 12 '11 at 12:11
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As others have said, the typeof operator will determine the type of the variable.

Beware though:

var str = 'A String' ;
var obj = new String(str) ;
console.log(typeof str) ;
console.log(typeof obj) ;

// Outputs:
// string
// object
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Thanks for the heads-up. Is there a way to get to "string" from new String(str) as well? –  Tomas Lycken Aug 12 '11 at 11:54
1  
+1, it's necessary to account for boxed strings. One way to fix this is to check for a method you know only belongs to strings — ex. if ( some_var.substring !== undefined ) { ... } –  Jon Gauthier Aug 12 '11 at 11:55
    
Or x instanceof String with the caveat of prototype inheritance –  Alex K. Aug 12 '11 at 11:58
    
Then I like the instanceof approach better. Is there any way around the prototype inheritance caveat? Something like inherits or implements? –  Tomas Lycken Aug 12 '11 at 12:06
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The typeof operator may get you what you need. i.e.:

typeof(myobj) == 'string'

(IIRC)

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You can;

function f(a) { print(typeof a) }

f({"prop": "value 1", "prop2": "value2" });

>>object

f("Some input");

>>string
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In javascript the command typeof returns the type of the variable.

I created a little jsfiddle It seems that the array returns also typeof as an object.

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<script>
var a = {'a':'b'};
if(typeof(a) == 'object'){
    alert('object');
}
elseif(typeof(a) == 'string'){
    alert('string');
}
</script>

http://forums.devx.com/showthread.php?t=5280

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You can use the typeof function:

if (typeof(myvar) === 'string') {
  // the code
}

see here for more information

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You want to use $.type, as this is more accurate than typeof

$.fn.plugin = function( options ) {

    console.log( $.type( options ) );

    if( $.type( options ) == 'string' ) {
        // Handle string case (first of above)
    }
    else if( $.type( options ) == 'object' && options != null ) {
        // Handle object case (second of above)
    }
    else {
        // Handle invalid input format

    }

};

$("#d1").plugin( new String('test')); //string
$("#d1").plugin('test'); //string
$("#d1").plugin({'key' : 'value'}); //object

Demo here

Edit

Also if options is not set then !options would be sufficient

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