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I've got a good old InvalidOperationException being thrown with the standard message

Collection was modified; enumeration operation may not execute.

The problem is, the enumerator isn't modifying itself, for example:

private TRoute _copyRoute(TRoute route)
{
    TRoute tempRoute = new TRoute();
    tempRoute.Initialize(route.Resource);

    foreach (TVisit visit in route)
    {
       tempRoute.Add(visit);
    }
    tempRoute.EndLocation = route.EndLocation;
    return tempRoute;
}

My code is multi-threaded (circa 12-15 threads for this example) and each thread is supposed to be working on its own deep clone of a route. Obviously something is going wrong somewhere, but, my question is how do I track this down with so many threads? Reducing the number significantly stops the problem manifesting itself.

In this case my route instance is an IList so I can play around with adding things to the interface. Underneath it has it's own List implementation.

EDIT

Just to add, I could ToArray() or ToList() this and maybe ignore the problem here but I don't really want to do that, I want to locate the cause. For example:

If I change it to the following:

private TRoute _copyRoute(TRoute route)
{
    TRoute tempRoute = new TRoute();
    tempRoute.Initialize(route.Resource);

    foreach (TVisit visit in route.ToList())
    {
       tempRoute.Add(visit);
    }
    tempRoute.EndLocation = route.EndLocation;
    return tempRoute;
}

Then I fail on this Assert, because a chance has occurred just before ToList()... I need to try and find out where that change is occuring

TRoute tempRoute1 = CopyRoute(route1);
TRoute tempRoute2 = CopyRoute(route2);
Debug.Assert(tempRoute1.Count == route1.Count);
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it seems there is osme thread touching route –  Felice Pollano Aug 12 '11 at 12:05
    
@Felice : Yes, I'm aware of that... How do I found out which thread is touching it is the question? –  Ian Aug 12 '11 at 12:08
    
What is TRoute, and what does the Initialize method do? –  Jon Skeet Aug 12 '11 at 12:12
    
12 threads, oh dear. You'll have to craft your code to make it debuggable. Write your own indexer. Now you have a way to inject assertions. –  Hans Passant Aug 12 '11 at 12:17
    
@GetArnold: Yep, aware of that thanks. The threads will all be doing quite similar stuff so it's hard to just to go through them and figure out where it was modified. –  Ian Aug 12 '11 at 12:22
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4 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Here's something you can use to wrap your IList<T> - it checks that it's on the right thread on each write operation. Of course, it would still be unsafe to be iterating over this on one thread while writing on another, but I assume that's not the problem. (You could always call CheckThread on all operations, not just the writing ones.)

using System;
using System.Collections;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Threading;

class ThreadAffineList<T> : IList<T>
{
    private readonly Thread expectedThread;
    private readonly IList<T> list;

    public ThreadAffineList(IList<T> list)
    {
        this.list = list;
        this.expectedThread = Thread.CurrentThread;
    }

    private void CheckThread()
    {
        if (Thread.CurrentThread != expectedThread)
        {
            throw new InvalidOperationException("Incorrect thread");
        }
    }

    // Modification methods: delegate after checking thread
    public T this[int index]
    {
        get { return list[index]; }
        set
        {
            CheckThread();
            list[index] = value;
        }
    }

    public void Add(T item)
    {
        CheckThread();
        list.Add(item);
    }

    public void Clear()
    {
        CheckThread();
        list.Clear();
    }

    public void Insert(int index, T item)
    {
        CheckThread();
        list.Insert(index, item);
    }

    public bool Remove(T item)
    {
        CheckThread();
        return list.Remove(item);
    }

    public void RemoveAt(int index)
    {
        CheckThread();
        list.RemoveAt(index);
    }

    // Read-only members
    public int Count { get { return list.Count; } }
    public bool IsReadOnly { get { return list.IsReadOnly; } }

    public IEnumerator<T> GetEnumerator()
    {
        return list.GetEnumerator();
    }

    IEnumerator IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()
    {
        return GetEnumerator();
    }

    public bool Contains(T item)
    {
        return list.Contains(item);
    }

    public void CopyTo(T[] array, int arrayIndex)
    {
        list.CopyTo(array, arrayIndex);
    }

    public int IndexOf(T item)
    {
        return list.IndexOf(item);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Not quite tracked down my issue yet, but I like this and am not sure why I never thought about it. Should eventually help me get there :) –  Ian Aug 17 '11 at 12:19
    
@Ian: Cool - please report back if it turns out there was something interesting going on :) –  Jon Skeet Aug 17 '11 at 12:23
    
I will do, although the latest thing I discovered was a similar issue at a much higher level (in my thread management classes) when aborting threads. I believe I've fixed that, and haven't seen this issue manifest itself again at this lower level yet, but still trying. I'm wondering if (as I've found sometimes) aborting threads can lead to exceptions in odd places. Think I probably need to improve my Joins() and make my threads return faster so they never get aborted.. –  Ian Aug 17 '11 at 12:29
    
@Ian: Aborting threads is pretty much never a good idea unless you're taking a whole AppDomain down... –  Jon Skeet Aug 17 '11 at 12:33
    
No, I'm not doing that. The threads are supposed to be a calculation thread that try and generate solutions. They shutdown at the end of a timeout (e.g. we wish for no more solutions) or if they reset with new initalization values. They are supposed to shutdown gracefully (e.g. given 200ms to Join()) before being aborted but I think they are being aborted more often that not. –  Ian Aug 17 '11 at 13:00
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Assuming you're in control of Add(TVisit)/Remove(TVisit) of TRoute underlying collection:

  1. Extend your TRoute.IEnumerator<TVisit> GetEnumerator() to set an AutoResetEvent or Mutex
  2. Extend your Add(TVisit)/Remove(TVisit) methods to wait for event/mutex with zero timeout

    if(!autoReseEvent.WaitOne(0)) throw new MyException();
    
  3. Catch MyExpcetion and you'll get the stack trace and change origin.

UPDATE: The issue with this approach is when to release event/mutex. You'll probably have to decorate your enumerator with a new class like below:

public IEnumerator<TVisit> GetEnumerator()
{
    IEnumerator<TVisit> originEnum = // get it somehow from underlying collection
    IEnumerator<TVisit> evenlope = new DisposableEvenlope<TVisit>(originEnum);
    evenlope.Disposed += new EventHandler(/* do your magic and reset event/mutex here */);
    return evenlope;
}

And the evelope itself:

public class DisposableEvenlope<T> : IEnumerator<T>
{
    private IEnumerator<T> _privateEnum;

    public event System.EventHandler Disposed;

    public DisposableEvenlope(IEnumerator<T> privateEnum)
    {
        _privateEnum = privateEnum;
    }

    public T Current
    {
        get { return _privateEnum.Current; }
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        Disposed(this, new System.EventArgs());
    }

    object IEnumerator.Current
    {
        get { return _privateEnum.Current; }
    }

    public bool MoveNext()
    {
        return _privateEnum.MoveNext();
    }

    public void Reset()
    {
        _privateEnum.Reset();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Vitaly, think thats what InBetween was suggesting in a comment. Giving that a try and will let you know if it works. –  Ian Aug 12 '11 at 12:49
    
One more thing - You'll need to deal with releasing a lock/event/mutex. Added some code snippets to share the general idea. –  Vitaly Aug 12 '11 at 14:14
    
I'm liking this idea so far, not quite finished yet but in my enumerator I'm compare (via reflection) the internal list version to one that I maintain myself, this is used to determine when the exception is thrown. Then instead of just incrementing my version I'm storing the stacktrace and hence should be able to see where the changes are occuring in theory. –  Ian Aug 15 '11 at 14:13
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The problem is obviously not in the code you have written as you are not modifying the collection while enumerating.

Somehow one of two things is happening:

  1. Your route is somehow not a deep clone and some thread is modyfying the same collection you are passing to the pasted logic (that should be easy to track is it is a coding issue somewhere, not some nasty race condition).
  2. Your exception is being raised precisely in the cloning logic and not in the code you have pasted.

Try implementing some locking mechanism while deep cloning your collection and see if that solves the issue.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the response, the clone is done via Serialization (Binary) so that should be fine. You're right in that somewhere I've not got a deep clone, but trying to identify that's quite hard... I'm hoping to work backward, finding out who's modified the route while enumerating, finding the thread, then finding out why it's not got a true clone. –  Ian Aug 12 '11 at 12:17
    
@lan: Well in theory, locking your collection should not be an issue as theoretically, if I'm understaning you correctly, each deep clone should only be accessed by one thread. Couldn't you implement in your collection ´Monitor´ and throw on a failed ´TryEnter´ and log all exception info? That way you could maybe work out at least what method is somehow accessing from a different thread the collection when it shouldn't be. –  InBetween Aug 12 '11 at 12:26
    
Ok so if I get you right.. on my route instance, add a Monitor.TryEnter() on GetEnumerator(), Add(), Remove() etc? Sounds like it might work.. –  Ian Aug 12 '11 at 12:31
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Since you are aware that mutiple thread can touch route, prevent any touch on route with a lock(), and always in a lock() convert route.ToArray() and then use that array for loop. This since you probably feel some performance drawbacks if you lock() the entire loop. To catch who is really touching the collection, you can derive it and track the thread id in a local member variable in the add/remove elements.

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