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I read some articles but really didn't understand what does select 1 from do? Someone says "you should use instead of select *". Here is an exapmle table:

cust_id     cust_name       cust_address

1000000001  Village Toys    Mapl
1000000002  Kids Place      South
1000000003  Fun4All         Sunny
1000000004  Fun4All         Riverside
1000000005  The Toy Store   53rd

What will the result be when I write select 1 from customer_table what does this statement do?

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About a decade or so ago, it was reasonable advise to suggest select 1 instead of select * in e.g. an EXISTS clause. The optimizer was improved a long time ago. It was never a replacement for "get all columns from this result set". –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Aug 12 '11 at 12:19
3  
Did you try it??? –  Escobar Ceaser Aug 12 '11 at 12:38

5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted
select 1 from table

will return a column of 1's for every row in the table. You could use it with a where statement to check whether you have an entry for a given key, as in:

if exists(select 1 from table where some_column = 'some_value')

What your friend was probably saying is instead of making bulk selects with select * from table, you should specify the columns that you need precisely, for two reasons:

1) performance & you might retrieve more data than you actually need.

2) the query's user may rely on the order of columns. If your table gets updated, the client will receive columns in a different order than expected.

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The construction is usually used in "existance" checks

if exists(select 1 from customer_table where customer = 'xxx')

or

if exists(select * from customer_table where customer = 'xxx')

Both constructions are equivalent. In the past people said the select * was better because the query governor would then use the best indexed column. This has been proven not true.

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ok now i got the purpose for writing 1. thank you –  Mehmet Aug 12 '11 at 12:23

It does what you ask, SELECT 1 FROM table will SELECT (return) a 1 for every row in that table, if there were 3 rows in the table you would get

1
1
1

Take a look at Count(*) vs Count(1) which may be the issue you were described.

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thank you dude. got it –  Mehmet Aug 12 '11 at 12:23
    
Why would I want that? –  Imray Dec 8 '13 at 12:54

The statement SELECT 1 FROM SomeTable just returns a column containing the value 1 for each row in your table. If you add another column in, e.g. SELECT 1, cust_name FROM SomeTable then it makes it a little clearer:

            cust_name
----------- ---------------
1           Village Toys
1           Kids Place
1           Fun4All
1           Fun4All
1           The Toy Store
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SELECT COUNT(*) in EXISTS/NOT EXISTS

EXISTS(SELECT CCOUNT(*) FROM TABLE_NAME WHERE CONDITIONS) - the EXISTS condition will always return true irrespective of CONDITIONS are met or not.

NOT EXISTS(SELECT CCOUNT(*) FROM TABLE_NAME WHERE CONDITIONS) - the NOT EXISTS condition will always return false irrespective of CONDITIONS are met or not.

SELECT COUNT 1 in EXISTS/NOT EXISTS

EXISTS(SELECT CCOUNT 1 FROM TABLE_NAME WHERE CONDITIONS) - the EXISTS condition will return true if CONDITIONS are met. Else false.

NOT EXISTS(SELECT CCOUNT 1 FROM TABLE_NAME WHERE CONDITIONS) - the NOT EXISTS condition will return false if CONDITIONS are met. Else true.

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Please edit answer to format code :) –  Andy Holmes Dec 23 '13 at 8:27

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