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Is this guaranteed to work:

struct A
{
  struct Gold {};
};

struct B : public A
{
  typedef Gold BaseGold;
  struct Gold {};
};

struct C : public B
{
  typedef Gold BaseGold;
  struct Gold {};
};

static_assert(is_same<B::BaseGold, A::Gold>::value, "Not the right treasure!");
static_assert(is_same<C::BaseGold, B::Gold>::value, "Not the right treasure!");

It seems to work on VS2010. Obviously it relies on subtle declaration order/name lookup rules, so I was wondering what the standard says on the matter...

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1  
For those of us without VS2010, what is the behaviour you observe? –  Oli Charlesworth Aug 12 '11 at 12:57
    
@Oli: I think he refers to the fact that Gold has two meanings inside the derived type, first it is used in the typedef to refer to the type enclosed in the base class, and then redefined to be a local type. I assume that the behavior in VS2010 is that it allows it, get's the intended type in the typedef but the name is then reused for the type enclosed in the derived type. I am quite sure this is incorrect, but I haven't found the quote from the standard yet. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Aug 12 '11 at 13:10
1  
Why don't you just do typedef A::Gold BaseGold; and then the question just goes away? –  Mark B Aug 12 '11 at 13:10
    
@Mark B: The whole point is to automatically identify a base-class aspect without explicitly mentioning it again. –  ltjax Aug 12 '11 at 13:13
1  
Compiles fine for me with gcc (using -std=c++0x - version 4.5.2) –  sje397 Aug 12 '11 at 13:31
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2 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Undefined behavior.

3.3.7/1

The following rules describe the scope of names declared in classes:

2) A name N used in a class S shall refer to the same declaration in its context and when re-evaluated in the completed scope of S. No diagnostic is required for a violation of this rule.

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So to rephrase that: Whenever I add a nested class X in Derived, where Base::X already exists, I'm actually causing undefined behaviour? –  ltjax Aug 12 '11 at 14:33
    
Or are you just not allowed to refer to Base::X before the declaration of Derived::X (in the classes scope)? –  ltjax Aug 12 '11 at 14:47
1  
Base::X is unambiguous before and after the declaration of Derived::X. The ambiguity results when you don't qualify the Base:: member. –  Mark B Aug 12 '11 at 14:55
1  
@ltjax: That does not make it right. The definition of Gold after the typedef is what causes the problem. Basically when you add a member, the member is not added to the bits and pieces of the class that are below that line, but rather to the whole class, from opening to closing brace. That means that the typedef conceptually would refer to the Gold declared in the same class, but the language is defined to be parsed in an up-down fashion, which means that the typedef will not be reevaluated. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Aug 12 '11 at 15:30
1  
@ltjax: It is ill formed whether you use the unqualified name again or not. Note that all external users of the class will use test::Gold, and that is a usage of the newly defined type. Or maybe I did not understand what you mean by avoiding mentioning the unqualified Gold (note that if you used test::Gold you would still be referring to the newly defined Gold, not to the inherited one, and again two entities in potentially the same scope would use the same identifier to refer to different types. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Aug 12 '11 at 16:07
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Since there's been no quote yet, I've been playing around with your example:

Both gcc 4.5.1 and Clang 3.0 accept the code as can be seen below.

Now, we just need someone to dig out an authoritative answer. With Clang, gcc and VC++ agreeing though (not that frequent), it seems intended.

On ideone (4.5.1):

#include <utility>

struct A
{
  struct Gold {};
};

struct B : public A
{
  typedef Gold BaseGold;
  struct Gold {};
};

struct C : public B
{
  typedef Gold BaseGold;
  struct Gold {};
};

static_assert(std::is_same<B::BaseGold, A::Gold>::value, "Not the right treasure!");
static_assert(std::is_same<C::BaseGold, B::Gold>::value, "Not the right treasure!");

On Clang:

#include <stdio.h>

template <typename T, typename U>
struct is_same { enum { value = false }; };

template <typename T>
struct is_same<T,T> { enum { value = true }; };

struct A
{
  struct Gold {};
};

struct B : public A
{
  typedef Gold BaseGold;
  struct Gold {};
};

struct C : public B
{
  typedef Gold BaseGold;
  struct Gold {};
};

int main() {
  if (!is_same<B::BaseGold, A::Gold>::value) {
    printf("oups");
  }
  if (!is_same<C::BaseGold, B::Gold>::value) {
    printf("oups");
  }
}

Clang output (as expected):

define i32 @main() nounwind readnone {
entry:
  ret i32 0
}
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