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Sounds funny, but how can I get the external IP address from a client?

I tried few things, but didn't work for me.

in first place I tried

request.getRemoteAddr()

and I am getting the result as: 0:0:0:0:0:0:0:1

in second place I tried

InetAddress ip = InetAddress.getLocalHost();
ip.getHostAddress());

and I am getting the result as: 127.0.0.1

in third place I tried

        URL whatismyip = new URL("http://checkip.dyndns.org:8245/");
        BufferedReader inIP = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(whatismyip.openStream()));

        String IPStrOld = inIP.readLine(); //IP as a String
        String IPStrNewest = IPStrOld.replace("<html><head><title>Current IP Check</title></head><body>Current IP Address: ", "");
        String IPStr = IPStrNewest.replace("</body></html>", "");

but I get the external IP of the server only

and for the last place

        URL whatismyip = new URL("http://automation.whatismyip.com/n09230945.asp");
        BufferedReader inIP = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(whatismyip.openStream()));
        String ip = inIP.readLine();

this is the same, I get the external IP of the server only

So, what's the deal?

share|improve this question
    
What exactly do you mean by "the external IP address of a client"? Can you give some concrete examples? For instance, what if a client is accessing the server over a local area network? If that is not a valid scenario, that should be explained in the question. And by concrete examples, I mean that you should detail where the client is located (ie. which type of network), how it reaches the server, which IP addresses are in play, and which one you're trying to get hold of. –  Lasse V. Karlsen Aug 12 '11 at 13:25
    
the IP address of the router, I hope you understand now?. "where the client is located" - this is what I want to know :) + client's IP ie: 103.456.768.22 –  Denees Aug 12 '11 at 13:35
    
@hoss Ok, then when the client is making a request to you, the address translation will happen (NAT or proxy server) and your server will accept the remote connection of the user. This connection should provide you with the client's translated address. Hence, I maintain that jzd's answer is the correct one and there is an extra issue to solve. What is the type of your 'request' object? –  JVerstry Aug 12 '11 at 13:45
    
ok, here it is HttpServletRequest request = (HttpServletRequest) ActionContext.getContext().get(ServletActionContext.HTTP_REQUEST); –  Denees Aug 12 '11 at 13:46

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

If your client is using NAT (network address translation) it may not have an external address. Most often, in my experience, this is the case. At work, my web requests go through a proxy so the web server can only determine this address. At home I use NAT via a server so this laptop I'm typing on has no external address. The closest thing is what is returned from 'whatismyip', my server address, through which I may sometimes forward ports that go to my laptop.

share|improve this answer
    
and eventually, there is no solution? in my application I need to check from which country is the client and/or from wich IP he/she made that order –  Denees Aug 12 '11 at 12:48
    
I don't think so. I'm in Australia, and the work proxy is in Singapore...does wonders for localised web sites :( –  sje397 Aug 12 '11 at 12:56
    
No, this answer is not correct. If a user is accessing the web via NAT, the NAT will assign it a temporary public IP address and port for all connections. Otherwise, the Internet would not work. This address is not permanent, but it does exist. –  JVerstry Aug 12 '11 at 13:05
    
No @JVerstry, you are wrong. The packets are rewritten by the router when they are passed from the internal to external network or vice versa. There is no temporary address. Read the link I provided. –  sje397 Aug 12 '11 at 13:09
    
I agree, but that is not what I mean. From hoos's side, not matter if the address is translated by a NAT or a proxy server, this address is created and should be visible for him. –  JVerstry Aug 12 '11 at 13:15

Running "whatismyip" actions on code run on the server is only going to give you the server address.

Also,

http://www.rgagnon.com/javadetails/java-0363.html

From that link:

<%
out.print( request.getRemoteAddr() );
out.print( request.getRemoteHost() );
%>

You may not get the real client IP if a the client is behind a proxy, you will get the IP of the proxy and not the client. However, the proxy may include the requesting client IP in a special HTTP header.

<%
out.print( request.getHeader("x-forwarded-for") );
%>
share|improve this answer
    
request.getRemoteAddr() always gets the IP as localhost (127.0.0.1) even is this is the server or the client –  Denees Aug 12 '11 at 12:45
    
? That doesn't match what you said in your question. –  jzd Aug 12 '11 at 12:46
    
maybe, but the 0:0:0:0:0:0:0:1 it too an invalid IP :) –  Denees Aug 12 '11 at 12:50
    
@hoss jzd's answer is the correct one. Now if you don't get valid IP address from the connection created by the user's request, then your issue is coming from somewhere else. If you are using sockets, you should be able to retrieve that information, especially if your client is receiving answers from your server. –  JVerstry Aug 12 '11 at 13:10

The code:

    URL whatismyip = new URL("http://checkip.dyndns.org:8245/");
    BufferedReader inIP = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(whatismyip.openStream()));
    String IPStrOld = inIP.readLine(); //IP as a String
    String IPStrNewest = IPStrOld.replace("<html><head><title>Current IP Check</title></head><body>Current IP Address: ", "");
    String IPStr = IPStrNewest.replace("</body></html>", "");

works fine for me! I got my router IP address with it! (in a string like XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX)

The code for the website:

http://automation.whatismyip.com/n09230945.asp

does not work anymore...

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