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I'm trying to write a function that converts numbers to roman numerals. This is my code so far; however, it only works with numbers that are less than 400. Is there a quick and easy way to do this conversion, or extend my existing code so that it handles all cases? Thanks in advance for any help.

static string convertroman(int number)
    {
        int l = number / 10;
        StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
        for (int m = 0; m <= l; m++)
        {
            if (l == 0)
            {
                break;
            }
            if (l == 5)
            {
                sb = sb.Append(ro.L.ToString());
                break;
            }
            if (l == 4)
            {
                sb = sb.Append(ro.X.ToString()).Append(ro.L.ToString());
                break;
            }
            if (l == 9)
            {
                sb = sb.Append(ro.X.ToString()).Append(ro.C.ToString());
                break;
            }
            if (l == 10)
            {
                sb = sb.Append(ro.C.ToString());
                break;
            }

            if (l > 5 && l < 9)
            {
                sb = sb.Append(ro.L.ToString());
                l = l - 5;
                m = 0;
                // break;
                continue;
            }
            if (l > 10)
            {
                sb = sb.Append(ro.C.ToString());
                l = l - 10;
                m = 0;
                // continue;

            }
            else
            {
                sb = sb.Append(ro.X.ToString());
            }

        }
        int z = number % 10;
        for (int x = 0; x <= z; x++)
        {
            if (z == 0)
            {
                break;
            }
            if (z == 5)
            {
                sb = sb.Append(ro.V.ToString());
                break;
            }
            if (z == 4)
            {
                sb = sb.Append(ro.I.ToString()).Append(ro.V.ToString());
                break;
            }
            if (z == 9)
            {
                sb = sb.Append(ro.I.ToString()).Append(ro.X.ToString());
                break;
            }
            if (z == 10)
            {
                sb = sb.Append(ro.X.ToString());
                break;
            }
            if (z > 5 && z < 9)
            {
                sb = sb.Append(ro.V.ToString());
                z = z - 5;
                x = 0;
            }
            else
            {
                sb.Append(ro.I.ToString());
            }              

        }
        return sb.ToString();           
    }
share|improve this question
    
You may be interested in this JavaScript Roman Numeral Converter –  Justin Aug 12 '11 at 12:53
    
Take a look at this SO question: stackoverflow.com/questions/4986521/… –  James Hill Aug 12 '11 at 12:53
    
Have a look at this nice blog post. –  Vladimir Aug 12 '11 at 12:54
    
I needed this for a non-homework reason. I'm dynamically generating a (non-HTML) outline. –  Rick Mar 19 '13 at 18:58

9 Answers 9

try this, simple and compact

public static string ToRoman(int number)
    {
        if ((number < 0) || (number > 3999)) throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("insert value betwheen 1 and 3999");
        if (number < 1) return string.Empty;            
        if (number >= 1000) return "M" + ToRoman(number - 1000);
        if (number >= 900) return "CM" + ToRoman(number - 900); //EDIT: i've typed 400 instead 900
        if (number >= 500) return "D" + ToRoman(number - 500);
        if (number >= 400) return "CD" + ToRoman(number - 400);
        if (number >= 100) return "C" + ToRoman(number - 100);            
        if (number >= 90) return "XC" + ToRoman(number - 90);
        if (number >= 50) return "L" + ToRoman(number - 50);
        if (number >= 40) return "XL" + ToRoman(number - 40);
        if (number >= 10) return "X" + ToRoman(number - 10);
        if (number >= 9) return "IX" + ToRoman(number - 9);
        if (number >= 5) return "V" + ToRoman(number - 5);
        if (number >= 4) return "IV" + ToRoman(number - 4);
        if (number >= 1) return "I" + ToRoman(number - 1);
        throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("something bad happened");
    }
share|improve this answer
11  
+1 for using recursion. –  Andris Aug 3 '12 at 10:25
    
Does your throw exception stop program if "something bad happened"? The purpose of this function is to return only a value, so it should has at least a try-catch to maintain a return value. –  Tri Nguyen Dung Mar 6 '13 at 3:26
12  
-1 for recursion –  irfandar May 4 '13 at 21:13
    
why is recursion bad? I thought this was quite a neat solution –  Neil Thompson Jan 28 at 23:20
    
Recursion isn't "bad" so long as there's a good reason. It does have some downsides. For instance, notice the upper limit of 3999 in the above code. If you remove this limit and throw a large number at this method, you can get a stack overflow (no pun intended) pretty quickly. And, while I like the simplicity of this design, it's not very efficient from a memory standpoint due to the heavy string concatenation. –  Mike U Apr 25 at 21:27

Here's a much simpler algorithm - forgive me, I don't know C# so I'm writing this in JavaScript, but the same algorithm should apply (and I've commented so you can understand the algorithm):

function intToRoman(int) {

    // create 2-dimensional array, each inner array containing 
    // roman numeral representations of 1-9 in each respective 
    // place (ones, tens, hundreds, etc...currently this handles
    // integers from 1-3999, but could be easily extended)
    var romanNumerals = [
        ['', 'i', 'ii', 'iii', 'iv', 'v', 'vi', 'vii', 'viii', 'ix'], // ones
        ['', 'x', 'xx', 'xxx', 'xl', 'l', 'lx', 'lxx', 'lxxx', 'xc'], // tens
        ['', 'c', 'cc', 'ccc', 'cd', 'd', 'dc', 'dcc', 'dccc', 'cm'], // hundreds
        ['', 'm', 'mm', 'mmm'] // thousands
    ];

    // split integer string into array and reverse array
    var intArr = int.toString().split('').reverse(),
        len = intArr.length,
        romanNumeral = '',
        i = len;

    // starting with the highest place (for 3046, it would be the thousands 
    // place, or 3), get the roman numeral representation for that place 
    // and add it to the final roman numeral string
    while (i--) {
        romanNumeral += romanNumerals[ i ][ intArr[i] ];
    }

    return romanNumeral;

}

console.log( intToRoman(3046) ); // outputs mmmxlvi
share|improve this answer
    
That's the way i do it –  irfandar May 4 '13 at 17:29
2  
This would be the C# equivalent pastebin.com/w0hm9n5W –  BrunoLM Feb 26 at 1:25

This is actually quite a fun problem, and based on the reverse example on dofactory.com (turning roman numerals to decimals) its quite easy to reverse the pattern, and perhaps improve it a little. This code will support numbers from 1 to 3999999.

Begin with a context class, this defines the I/O of the parser

public class Context
{
    private int _input;
    private string _output;

    public Context(int input)
    {
        this._input = input;
    }

    public int Input
    {
        get { return _input; }
        set { _input = value; }
    }

    public string Output
    {
        get { return _output; }
        set { _output = value; }
    }
}

And an abstract expression, which defines the parsing operation

public abstract class Expression
{
    public abstract void Interpret(Context value);
}

Now, you need an abstract terminal expression, which defines the actual operation that will be performed:

public abstract class TerminalExpression : Expression
{
    public override void Interpret(Context value)
    {
        while (value.Input - 9 * Multiplier() >= 0)
        {
            value.Output += Nine();
            value.Input -= 9 * Multiplier();
        }
        while (value.Input - 5 * Multiplier() >= 0)
        {
            value.Output += Five();
            value.Input -= 5 * Multiplier();
        }
        while (value.Input - 4 * Multiplier() >= 0)
        {
            value.Output += Four();
            value.Input -= 4 * Multiplier();
        }
        while (value.Input - Multiplier() >= 0)
        {
            value.Output += One();
            value.Input -= Multiplier();
        }
    }

    public abstract string One();
    public abstract string Four();
    public abstract string Five();
    public abstract string Nine();
    public abstract int Multiplier();
}

Then, classes which define the behaviour of roman numerals (note, ive used the convention of lowercase where roman numerals use a bar over the letter to denote 1000 times)

class MillionExpression : TerminalExpression
{
    public override string One() { return "m"; }
    public override string Four() { return ""; }
    public override string Five() { return ""; }
    public override string Nine() { return ""; }
    public override int Multiplier() { return 1000000; }
}
class HundredThousandExpression : TerminalExpression
{
    public override string One() { return "c"; }
    public override string Four() { return "cd"; }
    public override string Five() { return "d"; }
    public override string Nine() { return "cm"; }
    public override int Multiplier() { return 100000; }
}
class ThousandExpression : TerminalExpression
{
    public override string One() { return "M"; }
    public override string Four() { return "Mv"; }
    public override string Five() { return "v"; }
    public override string Nine() { return "Mx"; }
    public override int Multiplier() { return 1000; }
}
class HundredExpression : TerminalExpression
{
    public override string One() { return "C"; }
    public override string Four() { return "CD"; }
    public override string Five() { return "D"; }
    public override string Nine() { return "CM"; }
    public override int Multiplier() { return 100; }
}
class TenExpression : TerminalExpression
{
    public override string One() { return "X"; }
    public override string Four() { return "XL"; }
    public override string Five() { return "L"; }
    public override string Nine() { return "XC"; }
    public override int Multiplier() { return 10; }
}
class OneExpression : TerminalExpression
{
    public override string One() { return "I"; }
    public override string Four() { return "IV"; }
    public override string Five() { return "V"; }
    public override string Nine() { return "IX"; }
    public override int Multiplier() { return 1; }
}

Almost there, we need a Non-terminal expression which contains the parse tree:

public class DecimalToRomaNumeralParser : Expression
{
    private List<Expression> expressionTree = new List<Expression>()
                                                  {
                                                      new MillionExpression(),
                                                      new HundredThousandExpression(),
                                                      new TenThousandExpression(),
                                                      new ThousandExpression(),
                                                      new HundredExpression(),
                                                      new TenExpression(),
                                                      new OneExpression()
                                                  };

    public override void Interpret(Context value)
    {
        foreach (Expression exp in expressionTree)
        {
             exp.Interpret(value);
        }
    }
}

Lastly, the client code:

Context ctx = new Context(123);
var parser = new DecimalToRomaNumeralParser();
parser.Interpret(ctx);
Console.WriteLine(ctx.Output); // Outputs CXXIII

Live example: http://rextester.com/rundotnet?code=JJBYW89744

share|improve this answer

I've created this class that does decimal <=> roman

public static class Roman
{
    public static readonly Dictionary<char, int> RomanNumberDictionary;
    public static readonly Dictionary<int, string> NumberRomanDictionary;

    static Roman()
    {
        RomanNumberDictionary = new Dictionary<char, int>
        {
            { 'I', 1 },
            { 'V', 5 },
            { 'X', 10 },
            { 'L', 50 },
            { 'C', 100 },
            { 'D', 500 },
            { 'M', 1000 },
        };

        NumberRomanDictionary = new Dictionary<int, string>
        {
            { 1000, "M" },
            { 900, "CM" },
            { 500, "D" },
            { 400, "CD" },
            { 100, "C" },
            { 50, "L" },
            { 40, "XL" },
            { 10, "X" },
            { 9, "IX" },
            { 5, "V" },
            { 4, "IV" },
            { 1, "I" },
        };
    }

    public static string To(int number)
    {
        var roman = new StringBuilder();

        foreach (var item in NumberRomanDictionary)
        {
            while (number >= item.Key)
            {
                roman.Append(item.Value);
                number -= item.Key;
            }
        }

        return roman.ToString();
    }

    public static int From(string roman)
    {
        int total = 0;

        int current, previous = 0;
        char currentRoman, previousRoman = '\0';

        for (int i = 0; i < roman.Length; i++)
        {
            currentRoman = roman[i];

            previous = previousRoman != '\0' ? RomanNumberDictionary[previousRoman] : '\0';
            current = RomanNumberDictionary[currentRoman];

            if (previous != 0 && current > previous)
            {
                total = total - (2 * previous) + current;
            }
            else
            {
                total += current;
            }

            previousRoman = currentRoman;
        }

        return total;
    }
}

Some Unit Tests for To method:

[TestClass]
public class DecimalToRomanTest
{
    [TestMethod]
    public void Roman_1_I()
    {
        Assert.AreEqual("I", Roman.To(1));
    }

    [TestMethod]
    public void Roman_2_II()
    {
        Assert.AreEqual("II", Roman.To(2));
    }

    [TestMethod]
    public void Roman_3_III()
    {
        Assert.AreEqual("III", Roman.To(3));
    }

    [TestMethod]
    public void Roman_4_IV()
    {
        Assert.AreEqual("IV", Roman.To(4));
    }

    [TestMethod]
    public void Roman_5_V()
    {
        Assert.AreEqual("V", Roman.To(5));
    }

    [TestMethod]
    public void Roman_9_IX()
    {
        Assert.AreEqual("IX", Roman.To(9));
    }

    [TestMethod]
    public void Roman_10_X()
    {
        Assert.AreEqual("X", Roman.To(10));
    }

    [TestMethod]
    public void Roman_49_XLIX()
    {
        Assert.AreEqual("XLIX", Roman.To(49));
    }

    [TestMethod]
    public void Roman_50_L()
    {
        Assert.AreEqual("L", Roman.To(50));
    }

    [TestMethod]
    public void Roman_100_C()
    {
        Assert.AreEqual("C", Roman.To(100));
    }

    [TestMethod]
    public void Roman_400_CD()
    {
        Assert.AreEqual("CD", Roman.To(400));
    }

    [TestMethod]
    public void Roman_500_D()
    {
        Assert.AreEqual("D", Roman.To(500));
    }

    [TestMethod]
    public void Roman_900_CM()
    {
        Assert.AreEqual("CM", Roman.To(900));
    }

    [TestMethod]
    public void Roman_1000_M()
    {
        Assert.AreEqual("M", Roman.To(1000));
    }

    [TestMethod]
    public void Roman_11984_MMMMMMMMMMMCMLXXXIV()
    {
        Assert.AreEqual("MMMMMMMMMMMCMLXXXIV", Roman.To(11984));
    }
}

Some Unit Tests for From method:

[TestClass]
public class RomanToDecimalTest
{
    [TestMethod]
    public void Roman_I_1()
    {
        Assert.AreEqual(1, Roman.From("I"));
    }

    [TestMethod]
    public void Roman_II_2()
    {
        Assert.AreEqual(2, Roman.From("II"));
    }

    [TestMethod]
    public void Roman_III_3()
    {
        Assert.AreEqual(3, Roman.From("III"));
    }

    [TestMethod]
    public void Roman_IV_4()
    {
        Assert.AreEqual(4, Roman.From("IV"));
    }

    [TestMethod]
    public void Roman_V_5()
    {
        Assert.AreEqual(5, Roman.From("V"));
    }

    [TestMethod]
    public void Roman_IX_9()
    {
        Assert.AreEqual(9, Roman.From("IX"));
    }

    [TestMethod]
    public void Roman_X_10()
    {
        Assert.AreEqual(10, Roman.From("X"));
    }

    [TestMethod]
    public void Roman_XLIX_49()
    {
        Assert.AreEqual(49, Roman.From("XLIX"));
    }

    [TestMethod]
    public void Roman_L_50()
    {
        Assert.AreEqual(50, Roman.From("L"));
    }

    [TestMethod]
    public void Roman_C_100()
    {
        Assert.AreEqual(100, Roman.From("C"));
    }

    [TestMethod]
    public void Roman_CD_400()
    {
        Assert.AreEqual(400, Roman.From("CD"));
    }

    [TestMethod]
    public void Roman_D_500()
    {
        Assert.AreEqual(500, Roman.From("D"));
    }

    [TestMethod]
    public void Roman_CM_900()
    {
        Assert.AreEqual(900, Roman.From("CM"));
    }

    [TestMethod]
    public void Roman_M_1000()
    {
        Assert.AreEqual(1000, Roman.From("M"));
    }

    [TestMethod]
    public void Roman_MMMMMMMMMMMCMLXXXIV_11984()
    {
        Assert.AreEqual(11984, Roman.From("MMMMMMMMMMMCMLXXXIV"));
    }
}
share|improve this answer
2  
Very elegant code –  Tejo Feb 26 at 11:24
    
In NumberRomanDictionary there is not 90 -> XC –  abc667 Jul 9 at 12:41

Far too late, probably you already solved this, however this is an algorithm which can do the trick for you as well.

Before you start, you could simply do the analysis on Roman literals. For the known ASCII set, only values between 0 and 4000 are supported. If you like to go beyond, you could define your own roman literal then.

Before we start, we know that with the given range above, we can form a roman string from seven occurrences of Roman Literals (I,V,X,L,C,D and M).

Therefore we start with a simple look-up table, based on indices which are calculated in another function. Unknown indices are returned as a white-space character. As I wrote above, one might add additional characters when needed:

    /// <summary>
    /// Helper method that looks up a given index to it's roman value.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="decimalValue"></param>
    /// <returns>The roman literal corresponding to it's index</returns>
    private char DecimalToRoman(int index)
    {
        switch (index)
        {
            case 1: return 'I';
            case 2: return 'V';
            case 3: return 'X';
            case 4: return 'L';
            case 5: return 'C';
            case 6: return 'D';
            case 7: return 'M';
            default: return ' ';
        }
    }

The real conversion will happen here:

    private string ConvertToRoman(string input)
    {
        int index = 0;
        string output = "";

        for (int i = 0; i < input.Length; i++)
        {
            //Some magic here, this formula will calculate the correct starting
            //index of the roman literal to find in the look-up table.
            //Since units, tens and hundreds (up to thousand) can be formed of
            //three roman literals, we need three indices for looking up the
            //correct roman literal.
            index = 2 * (input.Length - (i + 1)) + 1;

            char digit1 = DecimalToRoman(index);
            char digit2 = DecimalToRoman(index + 1);
            char digit3 = DecimalToRoman(index + 2);

            int originalValue = System.Convert.ToInt32(input[i] - '0');

            switch (originalValue)
            {
                case 1:
                case 2:
                case 3: for (int j = 0; j < originalValue; j++)
                        output += digit1.ToString();
                    break;
                case 4: output += digit1.ToString() + digit2.ToString();
                    break;
                case 5: output += digit2.ToString();
                    break;
                case 6:
                case 7:
                case 8: output += digit2.ToString();
                    for (int j = 0; j < originalValue - 5; j++)
                        output += digit1.ToString();
                    break;
                case 9: output += digit1.ToString() + digit3.ToString();
                    break;
            }              
        }
        return output;
    }

That is it. If you look for more OO Designed approaches, please accept the answers above this post. There are just a lot of ways to solve this approach.

EDIT: Note that this solution does not cheat (just looking up all occurences of roman literals) as well :)

share|improve this answer

This version doesn't "cheat" as others: it generates internally the "base" table with all the "base" "composable" numbers. For lazyness I'm using Tuples, instead of creating specialized classes. If you don't have C# 4.0, you can replace Tuple<> with KeyValuePair<>, Item1 with Key and Item2 with Value.

static Tuple<IList<Tuple<string, int>>, int> GenerateBaseNumbers()
{
    const string letters = "IVXLCDM";

    var tuples = new List<Tuple<string, int>>();
    Tuple<string, int> subtractor = null;

    int num = 1;
    int maxNumber = 0;

    for (int i = 0; i < letters.Length; i++)
    {
        string currentLetter = letters[i].ToString();

        if (subtractor != null)
        {
            tuples.Add(Tuple.Create(subtractor.Item1 + currentLetter, num - subtractor.Item2));
        }

        tuples.Add(Tuple.Create(currentLetter, num));

        bool isEven = i % 2 == 0;

        if (isEven)
        {
            subtractor = tuples[tuples.Count - 1];
        }

        maxNumber += isEven ? num * 3 : num;
        num *= isEven ? 5 : 2;
    }

    return Tuple.Create((IList<Tuple<string, int>>)new ReadOnlyCollection<Tuple<string, int>>(tuples), maxNumber);
}

static readonly Tuple<IList<Tuple<string, int>>, int> RomanBaseNumbers = GenerateBaseNumbers();

static string FromNumberToRoman(int num)
{
    if (num <= 0 || num > RomanBaseNumbers.Item2)
    {
        throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException();
    }

    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();

    int i = RomanBaseNumbers.Item1.Count - 1;

    while (i >= 0)
    {
        var current = RomanBaseNumbers.Item1[i];

        if (num >= current.Item2)
        {
            sb.Append(current.Item1);
            num -= current.Item2;
        }
        else
        {
            i--;
        }
    }

    return sb.ToString();
}

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    for (int i = 1; i <= RomanBaseNumbers.Item2; i++)
    {
        var calc = FromNumberToRoman(i);

        Console.WriteLine("{1}", i, calc);
    }
}
share|improve this answer

While I liked Mosè Bottacini's answer, using recursion has a couple of negative side effects in this scenario. One being the possible stack overflow, hence his limiting of the upper bound of the number. While, yes, I realize how ridiculous a huge number looks in roman numerals, this is still a limitation that is not necessary to achieve the result.

Also, since strings are immutable, his version is going to be very memory inefficient, due to the heavy use of string concatenation. Below is my modified version of his method, using just a while loop and a StringBuilder. My version should actually be more performant (although we're talking about differences in the sub-millisecond range) and much easier on system memory.

public static string ToRomanNumeral(this int value)
{
    if (value < 0)
        throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("Please use a positive integer greater than zero.");

    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
    int remain = value;
    while (remain > 0)
    {
        if (remain >= 1000) { sb.Append("M"); remain -= 1000; }
        else if (remain >= 900) { sb.Append("CM"); remain -= 900; }
        else if (remain >= 500) { sb.Append("D"); remain -= 500; }
        else if (remain >= 400) { sb.Append("CD"); remain -= 400; }
        else if (remain >= 100) { sb.Append("C"); remain -= 100; }
        else if (remain >= 90) { sb.Append("XC"); remain -= 90; }
        else if (remain >= 50) { sb.Append("L"); remain -= 50; }
        else if (remain >= 40) { sb.Append("XL"); remain -= 40; }
        else if (remain >= 10) { sb.Append("X"); remain -= 10; }
        else if (remain >= 9) { sb.Append("IX"); remain -= 9; }
        else if (remain >= 5) { sb.Append("V"); remain -= 5; }
        else if (remain >= 4) { sb.Append("IV"); remain -= 4; }
        else if (remain >= 1) { sb.Append("I"); remain -= 1; }
        else throw new Exception("Unexpected error."); // <<-- shouldn't be possble to get here, but it ensures that we will never have an infinite loop (in case the computer is on crack that day).
    }

    return sb.ToString();
}
share|improve this answer
    
In a quick performance test, I had both methods count to 3999 (since that's the upper limit of Mosè Bottacini's method). Recursive method calc'd 0-3999 in roman numerals in 3 milliseconds. Mine did it in 2 milliseconds. So, yeah, not a lot of performance difference. –  Mike U Apr 25 at 21:56
    
The reason for limiting to 3999 is because after 3999 you use the top bar notation. Top bar = 1,000's, Top & Bottom Bar = 1,000,000's. –  Michal Ciechan May 5 at 22:30
    
Ah, yes. A very fair point. –  Mike U May 6 at 16:33

my favourite & slim solution from DotNetSnippets

private string roman(int number)
{
    StringBuilder result = new StringBuilder();
    int[] digitsValues = { 1, 4, 5, 9, 10, 40, 50, 90, 100, 400, 500, 900, 1000 };
    string[] romanDigits = { "I", "IV", "V", "IX", "X", "XL", "L", "XC", "C", "CD", "D", "CM", "M" };
    while (number > 0)
    {
        for (int i = digitsValues.Count() - 1; i >= 0; i--)
            if (number / digitsValues[i] >= 1)
            {
                number -= digitsValues[i];
                result.Append(romanDigits[i]);
                break;
            }
    }
    return result.ToString();
}
share|improve this answer

I can provide a method which is comparatively simpler than the existing

using Microsoft.VisualBasic;
using System;
using System.Collections;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Data;
using System.Diagnostics;
public class Form1
{
    int[] indx = {
        1,
        2,
        3,
        4,
        5,
        10,
        50,
        100,
        500,
        1000
        // initialize array of integers 
    };
    string[] row = {
        "I",
        "II",
        "III",
        "IV",
        "V",
        "X",
        "L",
        "C",
        "D",
        "M"
        //Carasponding roman letters in for the numbers in the array
    };
        // integer to indicate the position index for link two arrays 
    int limit = 9;
        //string to store output
    string output = "";
    private void Button1_Click(System.Object sender, System.EventArgs e)
    {
        int num = 0;
        // stores the input 
        output = "";
        // clear output before processing
        num = Convert.ToInt32(txt1.Text);
        // get integer value from the textbox
        //Loop until the value became 0
        while (num > 0) {
            num = find(num);
            //call function for processing
        }
        txt2.Text = output;
        // display the output in text2
    }
    public int find(int Num)
    {
        int i = 0;
        // loop variable initialized with 0
        //Loop until the indx(i).value greater than or equal to num
        while (indx(i) <= Num) {
            i += 1;
        }
        // detemine the value of limit depends on the itetration
        if (i != 0) {
            limit = i - 1;
        } else {
            limit = 0;
        }
        output = output + row(limit);
        //row(limit) is appended with the output
        Num = Num - indx(limit);
        // calculate next num value
        return Num;
        //return num value for next itetration 
    }
}
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