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I'm doing simple string input parsing and I am in need of a string tokenizer. I am new to C# but have programmed Java, and it seems natural that C# should have a string tokenizer. Does it? Where is it? How do I use it?

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Same question: stackoverflow.com/questions/1134311/… –  Mikhail Nov 4 '10 at 12:14

9 Answers 9

up vote 85 down vote accepted

You could use String.Split method.

class ExampleClass
{
    public ExampleClass()
    {
        string exampleString = "there is a cat";
        // Split string on spaces. This will separate all the words in a string
        string[] words = exampleString.Split(' ');
        foreach (string word in words)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(word);
            // there
            // is
            // a
            // cat
        }
    }
}

For more information see Sam Allen's article about splitting strings in c# (Performance, Regex)

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The split method of a string is what you need. In fact the tokenizer class in Java is deprecated in favor of Java's string split method.

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I just want to highlight the power of C#'s Split method and give a more detailed comparison, particularly from someone who comes from a Java background.

Whereas StringTokenizer in Java only allows a single delimiter, we can actually split on multiple delimiters making regular expressions less necessary (although if one needs regex, use regex by all means!) Take for example this:

str.Split(new char[] { ' ', '.', '?' })

This splits on three different delimiters returning an array of tokens. We can also remove empty arrays with what would be a second parameter for the above example:

str.Split(new char[] { ' ', '.', '?' }, StringSplitOptions.RemoveEmptyEntries)

One thing Java's String tokenizer does have that I believe C# is lacking (at least Java 7 has this feature) is the ability to keep the delimiter(s) as tokens. C#'s Split will discard the tokens. This could be important in say some NLP applications, but for more general purpose applications this might not be a problem.

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I think the nearest in the .NET Framework is

string.Split()
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use Regex.Split(string,"#|#");

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Why? What does this do? –  EnvisionAndDevelop Dec 3 '14 at 17:08

For complex splitting you could use a regex creating a match collection.

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I don't know Java, but i think you need String.Split.

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read this, split function has an overload takes an array consist of seperators http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.stringsplitoptions.aspx

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If you are using C# 3.5 you could write an extension method to System.String that does the splitting you need. You then can then use syntax:

string.SplitByMyTokens();

More info and a useful example from MS here http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb383977.aspx

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10  
This is a solution to a local problem, not an obvious/general purpose System.String operation. A utility class might be in order, but it would be extension method abuse to use an extension method here. –  Sam Harwell Jul 15 '09 at 21:48

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