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I've tried to come up with the Big O Running time of the following data structures. Are they Correct?

  • Inserting n integers into an initially empty AVL Tree (best case) O(log n)

  • Inserting n integers into an initially empty AVL Tree (worst case) O(log n)

  • Inserting n integers into an initially empty binary search tree that does not enforce structure properties (best case) O(log n)

  • Inserting n integers into an initially empty binary search tree that does not enforce structure properties (worst case) O(n)

Also an explanation as to why they are incorrect would be helpful

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Why is this tagged C ? Surely the complexity is the same in all languages ? –  cnicutar Aug 12 '11 at 13:52
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do you mean how much it will take to insert each element? or all of them? inserting n elements is always omega(n). –  amit Aug 12 '11 at 13:58
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@cnicutar: strictly, complexity depends on the complexity of the basic operations. The basic operations in C are different from those in Haskell or Prolog. Not that it matters in this case, though. –  larsmans Aug 12 '11 at 14:18
    
@amit that's not necessarily true. With distributed computing and shared memory, it is perfectly feasible to insert n elements in the same time it would take to insert a single element. While it may not necessarily apply in this case, it's important to note. –  corsiKa Aug 17 '11 at 17:53
    
@glowcoder: time complexity refers to the number of OPs needed, and not the actual time it takes. it still takes omega(n) OPs, it's just happen that they happen at the same time. –  amit Aug 17 '11 at 19:45

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is incorrect in your definition:

Inserting n integers into an initially empty AVL Tree (best case) O(log n)

You can't access (and copy) n data items in less than n operations, because you should read each item (so, O(n) is bare minimum of moving on n elements).

So, my assumtion is that you give correct O() for single element (this is a bit wrong, because best can be achieved on special inputs; your estimations are of average case, not the best), so, for total described operation I'll multiply each with O(n):

  • Inserting n integers into an initially empty AVL Tree (best case) O(n*log n) UPDATE: this is the average; best time can be lower on special inputs.

  • Inserting n integers into an initially empty AVL Tree (worst case) O(n*log n)

  • Inserting n integers into an initially empty binary search tree that does not enforce structure properties (best case) O(n*log n) UPDATE: this may depend on implementation and on sequence of integers; so best case is O(n) (see comments).

  • Inserting n integers into an initially empty binary search tree that does not enforce structure properties (worst case) O(n*n)

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BST: The worst case is not better than the best case. Worst case is O(n^2). –  duedl0r Aug 12 '11 at 14:02
    
You are right, Thanks, it was a typo. –  osgx Aug 12 '11 at 14:04
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Best case is probably meant to be best case, as in: "it will be a balanced tree in the end". And of course you can create a randomized binary search tree, then you have worst case O(n log n) with very high probability. –  duedl0r Aug 12 '11 at 14:10
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note that inserting [1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,.....,1] into a tree is NOT O(nlogn), it is O(n). –  amit Aug 12 '11 at 14:11
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This is not correct. If you do not enforce special tree properties, your binary tree will become a sorted list, and inserting n sorted elements into an empty sorted list has O(n) –  Chronial Aug 12 '11 at 14:11

I am assuming here you need the total time for inserting all the elements:

(1) at best case for an AVL tree, you will never need to go below the root, [i.e. all the elements are equal to the root] so it will be O(n). [never need to deepen more then 1 step, regardless of the tree's size]. O(1) per element.

(2) worst case for AVL tree: inserting n integers to an AVL tree is O(nlogn). each step is O(log(T)) where T is the size at that moment. O(log1) + O (log2) + ... + O(logn) = O(log1 + log2 + ... + logn) = O(log(1*...*n)) = O(nlogn). so O(nlogn). O(logn) per element

(3) with no structure enforce, best case, still O(n), same reason for (1). at best case, all elements you add are exactly the root, so you will never need to go down in the tree, no matter what its size is. O(1) per element.

(4) with no structure enforce, worst case: as said in other answers, finding the place for each element is O(n), so at overall you will have a worst time complexity of O(n^2). O(n) per element.

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How can inserting n integers result in a Big O of O(logn). That doesn't make any sense. Surely reading the integers itself would take at least O(n).

So for the unbalanced, BST example the worst case is where you insert a sorted list of numbers like 1,2,3,4. Inserting 1 takes 0 time. Inserting 2 takes ~1 time. Inserting 3 takes ~2 time. etc. This amounts to 1+2+3+...+n = O(n^2).

Similarly in the best case scenario, each subsequent insert takes log(i) time. So the total running time is log(1)+log(2)+log(3)+...+log(n). What this evaluates to is not immediately obvious. But if you know a bit of calculus, you can see that this is (almost) the trapezoidal rule approximation to integral of log n from 1 to n. This is approximately nlogn - n = O(nlogn).

I'm sure you can do similar analysis for the AVL trees.

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I'm sorry, but they are all wrong.

what you used are the Big-Os for a single insertion. If you do n of them, you have to take that times n.

So the correct figures are:

Inserting n integers into:

  • AVL Tree (worst case): O(log(n) * n)
  • AVL Tree (best case): This is difficult, but I guess it's O(log(n) * n), too
  • binary search tree that does not enforce structure properties (best case): O(n) - The best case insertion time for 1 item is actually O(1)
  • binary search tree that does not enforce structure properties (worst case): O(n^2) - if you do not enforce structure properties, you might end up with a completely unbalanced tree, so in the worst case your tree of n elements has a height of n => Your tree will deform into a list.
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4th case: But if tree deformed to list, total time of inserting n integers can be O(n) (if we add every new element at top of the tree - so it is implementation-dependent) –  osgx Aug 12 '11 at 14:08
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@osgx that's kind of right - but the O(n) would then still be the best case, and the 4th case is worst case. –  Chronial Aug 12 '11 at 14:13

Yes, you're correct, if you multiply everything with n. Your running time is for one element.

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No one (without help of oracle, jinn or parallel machine counted as single operation) can move n elements faster than O(n) steps. –  osgx Aug 12 '11 at 13:59
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Yes, he probably meant for every element. I misread him the first time too.. –  duedl0r Aug 12 '11 at 14:01
    
but I can read "Inserting n integers" only as "Total time of working on n integers", not as "inserting a single integer into tree which stores n elements". –  osgx Aug 12 '11 at 14:03
    
Yes you're right. –  duedl0r Aug 12 '11 at 14:07
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no, the running times are not all correct for single elements. –  Chronial Aug 12 '11 at 14:14

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