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What algorithms or formulas are available for computing the equinoxes and solstices? I found one of these a few years ago and implemented it, but the precision was not great: the time of day seemed to be assumed at 00:00, 06:00, 12:00, and 18:00 UTC depending on which equinox or solstice was computed. Wikipedia gives these computed out to the minute, so something more exact must be possible. Libraries for my favorite programming language also come out to those hardcoded times, so I assume they are using the same or a similar algorithm as the one I implemented.

I also once tried using a library that gave me the solar longitude and implementing a search routine to zero in on the exact moments of 0, 90, 180, and 270 degrees; this worked down to the second but did not agree with the times in Wikipedia, so I assume there was something wrong with this approach. I am, however, pleasantly surprised to discover that Maimonides (medieval Jewish scholar) proposed an algorithm using the exact same idea a millenium ago.

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I'm not sure if this is an accurate enough solution for you, but I found a NASA website that has some code snippets for calculating the vernal equinox as well as some other astronomical-type information. I've also found some references to a book called Astronomical Algorithms which may have the answers you need if the info somehow isn't available online.

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I've seen that book mentioned before; I was hoping to use SO as an opportunity to get some of that information online if it's not already. :) –  skiphoppy Apr 1 '09 at 5:03
    
It'd certainly be nice to have it somewhere! It seems the algorithms are rather complicated and specialized. –  Neil Williams Apr 1 '09 at 5:05
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I know you're looking for something that'll paste into an answer here, but I have to mention SPICE, a toolkit produced by NAIF at JPL, funded by NASA. It might be overkill for Farmer's Almanac stuff, but you mentioned interest in precision and this toolkit is routinely used in planetary science.

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I have implemented Jean Meeus' (the author of the Astronomical Algorithms referenced above) equinox and solstice algorithm in C and Java, if you're interested.

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I need your implementation in Java of above mentioned topics. Could u share the same. My email id is astroshoav.dev@gmail.com Thanks –  Kumar Apr 2 at 6:07
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