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I have the following function:

private string ParseJson(dynamic q)
    {
        string returnJSON = "[{ \"type\" : \"pie\", \"name\" : \"Campaigns\", \"data\" : [ ";
        foreach (var grp in q)
        {
            double currCount = grp.Count();
            if (grp.Key != null)
                returnJSON += "['" + grp.Key + "', " + currCount + "],";
            else
                returnJSON += "['none', " + currCount + "],";
        }
        returnJSON = returnJSON.Substring(0, returnJSON.Length - 1);
        returnJSON += "]}]";

        return returnJSON;
    }

I call it from methods like this one:

public string GetCampaignData()
    {
        PaymentModelDataContext db = new PaymentModelDataContext();
        var q = from Event in db.TrackingEvents
                group Event by Event.campaignID;


        return ParseJson(q);

    }

I use q for several different quries, all grouping data. The problem is that the runtime can't bind a type to q for some reason. Is this a proper use of dynamic? Is there a different way to do this?

share|improve this question
    
I get an error, because the object type (and thus structure) is unknown, there is no Count property. –  Elad Lachmi Aug 12 '11 at 14:08
    
.Count() is an extension method and doesn't exists on the Grouping IIRC. This probably gives the error that .Count is missing. Is it possible to refactor the code to not use dynamic as I personally don't see a good reason to use it? Also you don't parse JSON you write JSON. –  FuleSnabel Aug 12 '11 at 14:22
1  
Instead of accepting a dynamic, your method should accept an IGrouping<TKey, TElement> –  John Saunders Aug 12 '11 at 14:23
    
I know this is not your original question but have you concidered using the JavaScriptSerializer? This might be better than creating your own JSON –  Jay Aug 12 '11 at 14:23
    
@John: I agree dynamic isn't probably best use, since it's a collection of them, he should use IEnumerable<IGrouping<TKey,TValue>> –  James Michael Hare Aug 12 '11 at 14:37

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The problem is Count() is an extension method off of IEnumerable<T>, as such it can't be called from dynamic (because it's not a true method of the class).

Your variable grp is also dynamic because it results from an expression on dynamic variable q:

foreach (var grp in q)

Since we can't call extension methods off of dynamic (again, they aren't true members of the class), we need to explicitly call the extension method instead off the Enumerable static class. So change your code to:

double currCount = Enumerable.Count(grp);

And you'll see it work properly for the Count(), if you want to really use dynamic.

That said, I do agree with @John's comment that you should consider changing this to a non-dynamic. Actually, what your method would accept would be an IEnumerable> like so:

private string ParseJson<TKey,TValue>(IEnumerable<IGrouping<TKey,TValue>> q)
    {
        string returnJSON = "[{ \"type\" : \"pie\", \"name\" : \"Campaigns\", \"data\" : [ ";
        foreach (var grp in q)
        {
            double currCount = grp.Count();
            if (grp.Key != null)
                returnJSON += "['" + grp.Key + "', " + currCount + "],";
            else
                returnJSON += "['none', " + currCount + "],";
        }
        returnJSON = returnJSON.Substring(0, returnJSON.Length - 1);
        returnJSON += "]}]";

        return returnJSON;
    }

You can also make the parameter type non-generic specific to your usage if you like. But this would work with all groupings...

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, interesting, i was more answering his question on the error on Count... Let me dig more. –  James Michael Hare Aug 12 '11 at 14:27
    
it appears a dynamic derived from a dynamic gets kinda lost, very interesting... –  James Michael Hare Aug 12 '11 at 14:39
    
Thank you! I always assumed a dynamic type just gets its type bound @ runtime, which would imply you can do ANYTHING with it during compilation, and any errors would occur @ runtime. It should be used with caution anyway, so if I'm using it, let me do whatever I want. That's my take, anyway :) –  Elad Lachmi Aug 12 '11 at 19:40

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