Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is this a correct way to use the <section> tag?

<section id="container">
   <section id="outer">
      <section id="inner">
      </section>
   </section>
</section>

I'm trying to work out whether or not I should use only one section id, and leave the other two sections as just divs?

share|improve this question
    
HTML5 spec on the section element. –  zzzzBov Aug 12 '11 at 14:10

4 Answers 4

If you are just using these elements to place things in some position / style things, then you should probably be using divs.

Section is really for grouping content that belongs together - you shouldn't really have a section without a title (H1 or similar) element describing what the section contains... a few people have made similar mistakes in the past I think:

http://html5doctor.com/the-section-element/

From the spec:

NOTE: The section element is not a generic container element. When an element is needed for styling purposes or as a convenience for scripting, authors are encouraged to use the div element instead. A general rule is that the section element is appropriate only if the element's contents would be listed explicitly in the document's outline.

Having said that, it's perfectly acceptable to nest section elements. Maybe something like:

<section>
    <h1>Portishead</h1>
    <p>Portishead are a cool band from Bristol</p>
    <section>
        <h1>Dummy (album)</h1>
        <p>some info....</p>
        <img src="..." />
    </section>
    <section>
        <h1>Portishead (album)</h1>
        <p>some other info info....</p>
        <img src="..." />
    </section>
</section>
share|improve this answer
    
would you mind linking that quote from w3c? Typically "headers" and "footers" are marked up with header and footer elements respectively. –  zzzzBov Aug 12 '11 at 14:18
    
@zzzzBov - no problem (Does seem a bit weird considering the header / footer tags, eh?) –  Paul Aug 12 '11 at 14:21
    
just as i suspected. w3schools is in no way affiliated with the w3c. Please read through w3fools. –  zzzzBov Aug 12 '11 at 14:24
    
good spot... edited. –  Paul Aug 12 '11 at 14:26
1  
Would you still use a section as the parent if you only had the h1 and no p there. That's my dilema. –  Jack Tuck Sep 19 '14 at 22:36

An updated method (as far as I understand it) could be something like this:

<main id="content">
  <div id="inner-wrapper">
    <section>
      <h1>Section Title</h1>
      ...
    </section>
    <section>
      <h1>Section Title</h1>
      ...
    </section>
  </div>
</main>

main {
  width: 100%;
  ...
  ...
}

#inner_wrapper {
  max-width: 80%;
  margin: 0 auto;
}

See: http://www.w3.org/TR/html-main-element/, http://www.sitepoint.com/html5-main-element/ or http://html5doctor.com/the-main-element/ for more info.

share|improve this answer

Short answer: The code as you've provided is not semantically valid.

Long answer:

section elements are meant to mark up sections of content. Each section of content (i.e. Introduction, Abstract, content, conclusion) could have subsections.

If you're using those elements for structural purpose, you should be using div elements instead. They are practically semantically meaningless.

This would be more semantic:

<section id="introduction">
  <div id="outer">
    <div id="inner">
      Some content
    </div>
  </div>
</section>

This would be a semantic way of marking up nested sections:

<section id="content">
  <h1>Fizz Buzz</h1>
  <section id="chapter-1">
    <h1>Foo bar baz</h1>
    ...
  </section>
  <section id="chapter-2">
    <h1>Lorem ipsum dolor</h1>
    ...
  </section>
  ....
</section>
share|improve this answer
    
Although this is only a skeletal example, it does look like the first section tag is being used as a container, surely a div would be used if the direct children are sections. –  Neil Sep 27 '11 at 12:17
    
@Neil, I suppose I did leave out adding a heading to #content –  zzzzBov Sep 27 '11 at 13:08

HTML5 also allows for setups such as:

<section>

<header>Header of section</header>
<aside><ul><li></li></ul></aside><!-- previously known as sidebar -->
<footer>Footer of section</footer>

</section>

multiple times on the same page, so you don't have just the one header, it goes a lot deeper than this, but it's worth checking out.

Check out the http://gsnedders.html5.org/outliner/

share|improve this answer
5  

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.