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I know I can use AWK but I am on a Windows box. I am making a function for others that may not have AWK. I also know I can write a C program but I would love not have to create maintain and compile something for a little Vim utility I am making.

The original file might be

THE DAY WAS LONG 
THE WAY WAS FAST

and it would become

TT
HH
EE

DW
AA
YY

WW
AA
SS

LF
OA
NS
GT

UPDATE: Golf rules apply to selecting correct answer.

UPDATE: Python fans should check out Mr. Duffy's answer below.

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Pardon -- "golf"? –  Charles Duffy Apr 1 '09 at 5:58
2  
Lowest number of characters... lowest score wins kind of thing. –  ojblass Apr 1 '09 at 12:45
    
It would have been even better if the solution transposed only the selected text... But, okay, the current solution is good enough for me. :) –  Denilson Sá May 15 '10 at 16:15
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6 Answers

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Here is a command in Vim language. So you don't have to compile Vim with +python support.

function! s:transpose()
    let maxcol = 0
    let lines = getline(1, line('$'))

    for line in lines
        let len = len(line)
        if len > maxcol 
            let maxcol = len
        endif
    endfor

    let newlines = []
    for col in range(0, maxcol - 1)
        let newline = ''
        for line in lines
            let line_with_extra_spaces = printf('%-'.maxcol.'s', line)
            let newline .= line_with_extra_spaces[col]
        endfor
        call add(newlines, newline)
    endfor

    1,$"_d
    call setline(1, newlines)
endfunction

command! TransposeBuffer call s:transpose()

Put this in newly created .vim file inside vim/plugin dir or put this to your [._]vimrc.
Execute :TransposeBuffer to transpose current buffer

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Pure vim gets you the nod. Thank you so much! –  ojblass Apr 2 '09 at 6:28
    
An unnecessarily wordy solution, in my opinion. By the way, technically speaking your solution does not work, since 1,$"_d does not do what you probably want it to do. I would write that line as sil %d_. –  ib. Sep 10 '11 at 14:02
    
@ib why you say it doesn't? It works for me and it delete the whole file into anonymous register, does it not? –  Mykola Golubyev Sep 13 '11 at 7:16
    
No, it does not: Open a nonempty buffer and run the Ex command you propose: :1,$"_d—nothing will be deleted. You are trying to use the Ex command :delete the same way as the Normal mode command d. However, both syntax and semantics of those commands are different! The :delete command accepts an optional range before the command name, and an optional register name after (without "). What you have written is the range 1,$ followed by a the commented text _d (see :quote). Thus, the only effect your command has is moving the cursor to the last line of the current buffer. –  ib. Mar 13 '12 at 2:37
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Vim support for a number of scripting languages built in -- see the Python interface as an example.

Just modify vim.current.buffer appropriately and you're set.

To be a little more specific:

function! Rotate()
python <<EOF
import vim, itertools
max_len = max((len(n) for n in vim.current.buffer))

vim.current.buffer[:] = [
    ''.join(n) for n in itertools.izip(
    	*( n + ' ' * (max_len - len(n))
    	   for n in vim.current.buffer))]
EOF
endfunction
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Sweet Jesus look at all all that! So much text manipulation goodness! –  ojblass Apr 1 '09 at 5:19
1  
++ oooh - was unaware that vim supported more than vimscript! Also perl, tcl, and ruby -- awesome! –  guns Apr 1 '09 at 6:29
1  
It supports those scripts but not by default. You have to turn them on during build. –  Mykola Golubyev Apr 1 '09 at 8:37
    
Right. Just about every distribution has a vim-full or vim-enhanced version, and I tested what I posted here against the Windows gvim –  Charles Duffy Apr 1 '09 at 16:10
    
Crazy Kudos I am going to wait to see if any golf answer like four key strokes and your done win out. I wonder what assumptions I should be allowed to make about the vim bulid itself to still be considered portable. –  ojblass Apr 2 '09 at 0:20
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If scripts don't do it for you, you could record the actions to a register (the carriage returns are added for readability):

qa
1G0
xGo<Esc>p
1G0j
xGp
q

This will give you a macro that you could run against the example above, or any 2-line strings of the same length. You only need to know the length of the string so you can iterate the operation the correct number of time

16@a

A fairly basic solution, but it works.

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1  
The input domain could be more than two lines with the same length. –  ojblass Apr 2 '09 at 6:27
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The following function performs required editing operations to "transpose" the contents of the current buffer.

fu!T()
let[m,n,@s]=[0,line('$'),"lDG:pu\r``j@s"]
g/^/let m=max([m,col('$')])
exe'%norm!'.m."A \e".m.'|D'
sil1norm!@s
exe'%norm!'.n.'gJ'
endf

Below is its one-line version,

let[m,n,@s]=[0,line('$'),"lDG:pu\r``j@s"]|exe'g/^/let m=max([m,col("$")])'|exe'%norm!'.m."A \e".m.'|D'|exe'sil1norm!@s'|exe'%norm!'.n.'gJ'
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1  
love vim to death! –  ojblass Jan 31 '12 at 19:42
    
@ojblass: Isn't this script the shortest Vim-only solution (in a "golf" sense that you have declared as a deciding rule for selecting answers) among those posted so far, is it? –  ib. Mar 14 '12 at 2:39
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Charles Duffy's code could be shortened/improved using izip_longest instead of izip:

function! Rotate()
    :py import vim, itertools
    :py vim.current.buffer[:] = [''.join(c) for c in itertools.izip_longest(*vim.current.buffer, fillvalue=" ")]
endfunction
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I've developed a vim plugin to do it. You can find it here. Run :Transpose to transpose the whole file.

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