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Is there any way to force a compiler (well GCC specifically) to make a class compile to object oriented C? Specifically what I want to achieve is to write this:

class Foo {
public:
  float x, y, z;
  float bar();
  int other();
  ...etc
};

Foo f;
float result = f.bar()
int obSize = sizeof(Foo);

Yet compile to exactly the same as:

Struct Foo { float x, y, z; };
float Foo_bar(Foo *this);

Foo f;
float result = Foo_bar(&f);
int obSize = sizeof(Foo);

My motivation is to increase readability, yet not suffer a memory penalty for each object of Foo. I'd imagine the class implementation normally obSize would be

obSize = sizeof(float)*3 + sizeof(void*)*number_of_class_methods

Mostly to use c++ classes in memory constrained microcontrollers. However I'd imagine if I got it to work I'd use it for network serialization as well (on same endian machines of course).

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3  
Well, sizeof(class Foo) == sizeof(struct Foo) anyway. –  Maxim Yegorushkin Aug 12 '11 at 14:14
    
struct X{ <content> } == class X{public: <content> } by definition. –  dascandy Aug 12 '11 at 14:18
    
Unless virtual keyword is used, of course. –  Maxim Yegorushkin Aug 12 '11 at 14:20
1  
Note to self, always run the code you post. Thanks for the lesson guys. -1 in stupidity for me... –  Imbrondir Aug 12 '11 at 14:31

5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Your compiler actually does exactly that for you. It might even be able to optimize optimistically by putting the this pointer in a register instead of pushing it onto the stack (this is at least what MSVC does on Windows), which you wouldn't be able to do with standard C calling convention.

As for:

obSize = sizeof(float)*3 + sizeof(void*)*number_of_class_methods
  1. It is plain false. Did you even try it ?
  2. Even if you had virtual functions, only one pointer to a table of functions would be added to each object (one table per class). With no virtual functions, nothing is added to an object beyond its members (and no function table is generated).
  3. void* represents a pointer to data, not a pointer to code (they need not have the same size)
  4. There is no guarantee that the size of the equivalent C struct is 3 * sizeof(float).
share|improve this answer
    
Calling conventions are outside the scope of C++ standard. However, on x86-64 up to 6 first arguments are passed in registers using C calling conventions. –  Maxim Yegorushkin Aug 12 '11 at 14:22
    
@Maxim: good to know. However, the fact that the first argument is a pointer to a class which will be likely to be looked up during the function call is unknown to a C compiler. –  Alexandre C. Aug 12 '11 at 14:24
    
Could not understand your last sentence. –  Maxim Yegorushkin Aug 12 '11 at 14:26
1  
@Maxim: method calls in C++ give a special meaning to the first argument, which is often dereferenced. This is an opportunity for optimistic optimizations. C compilers don't know about method calls, only function call. –  Alexandre C. Aug 12 '11 at 14:28
    
In addition to all that, using the POD struct for network serialization is just asking for endian or other sorts of problems. –  Mark B Aug 12 '11 at 14:37

C++ already does what you're talking about for non-polymorphic classes (classes without a virtual method).

Generally speaking, a C++ class will have the same size as a C struct, unless the class contains one or more virtual methods, in which case the overhead will be a single pointer (often called the vptr) for each class instance.

There will also be a single instance of a 'vtbl' that has a set of pointers for each virtual function - but that vtbl will be shared among all objects of that class type (ie., there's a single vtbl per-class type, and the various vptrs for objects of that class will point to the same vtbl instance).

In summary, if your class has no virtual methods, it will be no larger than the same C struct. This fits with the C++ philosophy of not paying for what you don't use.

However, note that non-static member functions in a C++ class do take an extra parameter (the this pointer) that isn't explicitly mentioned in the parameter list - that is essentially what you discuss in your question.


footnote: in C++ classes and structs are the same except for the minor difference of default member accessibility. In the above answer, when I use the term 'class', the behavior applies just as well to structs in C++. When I use the term 'struct' I'm talking about C structs.

Also note that if your classes use inheritance, the 'overhead' of that inheritance depends on the exact variety of inheritance. But as in the difference between polymorphic and non-polymorphic classes, whatever that cost might be, it's only brought in if you use it.

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No, your imagination is wrong. Class methods take up no space at all in an object. Why not write a class, and take the sizeof. Then add a few more methods and print the sizeof again. You will see that it hasn't changed. Something like this

First program

class X
{
public:
  int y;
  void method1() {}
};

int main()
{
  cout << sizeof(X) << '\n'; // prints 4
}

Second program

class X
{
public:
  int y;
  void method1() {}
  void method2() {}
  void method3() {}
  void method4() {}
  void method5() {}
  void method6() {}
};

int main()
{
  cout << sizeof(X) << '\n'; // also prints 4
}
share|improve this answer

Actually, I believe there is no specific memory penalty with using classes since member functions are stored once for every instance of the class. So your memory footprint would be more like 1*sizeof(void*)*number_of_class_methods + N*sizeof(float)*3 where you have N instances of Foo.

The only time you get an additional penalty is when using virtual functions in which case each object carries around a pointer to a vtable with it.

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You typed 'sizeof(void)'... I think you mean 'sizeof(void (*)())' or something like that. –  dascandy Aug 12 '11 at 14:17
    
Thanks, edited to match code in the Question. –  Dan Aug 12 '11 at 14:18
    
Why downvote? If something is false in my answer please say what. –  Dan Aug 12 '11 at 14:23
1  
(I'm not the downvoter). void* and pointer to functions are incompatible and need not have the same size. Also, no virtual function, no table. And because of alignment considerations, nothing mandates sizeof(Foo) == 3 * sizeof(float`). –  Alexandre C. Aug 12 '11 at 14:26
1  
void* issue is good to know. Indeed, the standard only specifies that the variables will be allocated in order of declaration not that there will be no padding so mathematically sizeof(Foo) >= 3*sizeof(float) plus I do mention the vtable only matters if using virtual functions. –  Dan Aug 12 '11 at 14:30

You need to test, but as far as i know a class instance does only store pointers to its methods if said methods are virtual; otherwise, a struct and a class will take roughly the same amount of memory (bar different alignment done by different compilers etc).

share|improve this answer
    
it'll store only one pointer to the Vtable if any of its members are virtual, and only the vtable itself will grow if you add functions to it. 5M objects of a class with 5M virtual functions do not take 100TB of memory. –  dascandy Aug 12 '11 at 14:18
    
To be precise, it will store one pointer if any of the methods are virtual. So it's still not really true that adding methods to a class increases the size of the class. –  john Aug 12 '11 at 14:19

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