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This is specific to Android 3.0/3.1 In order to implement a cloud security layer, I would like to reroute all IP traffic destined for certain ports through my custom cloud server which would then serve up the required pages if they don't pose any threat.

The reasons I would like to do this are: 1. The applications running on Android would still continue their interaction with regular requests and wouldn't require any modifications 2. Better security. It should not be possible for a user to disable/block my reroute service. Hiding my implementation in the network layer would make it difficult for users to tamper with it.

I would like to know if this procedure is possible at all. If so, what is the best implementation procedure. If not, does anyone have a suggestion on any alternate methodologies.

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  1. The applications running on Android would still continue their interaction with regular requests and wouldn't require any modifications

This is only possible if you root your phone (or create your own firmware, which probably involves rooting the phone to deploy it). For example, Orbot, which is an implementation of the Tor proxy for Android, needs root in order to transparently pass all TCP requests through its proxy.

It should not be possible for a user to disable/block my reroute service.

The only way to do that is by making your own firmware.

Allowing ordinary SDK applications to do anything of what you request would be a massive security hole.

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Thank you. I understand that I would have to create custom firmware in order to fulfill the requirements. Does this mean I have to start from AOSP Android 3.1 code or would I have access to the default ROMs for each device like the Galaxy Tab or Motorola Xoom? –  Kratos Aug 12 '11 at 14:57
    
What android does not provide is a means for "unordinary" SDK applications which a user can decide to trust more than the platform itself. One-size-fits-all security can only go so far; everyone knows that the most secure platforms are customizable at a fine grain, but take expertise to administer - a problem nobody has yet solved in the consumer space for either desktops or gadgets. –  Chris Stratton Aug 12 '11 at 14:57
    
@Kratos you probably cannot get full source for a vendor's build (or at present any full version of honeycomb) unless you partner with them, but you may be able to get enough. For example, the kernel license requires that you be able to get that source, at which point you should be able to add modules, and if you can gain root access you could change the configuration files to enable those. Since the platform doesn't really have a concept of fine-grained network permission to extend, you'd mostly be working at the kernel and application levels with the platform code remaining uninvolved. –  Chris Stratton Aug 12 '11 at 15:02
    
@Kratos: I would focus on working with groups that are already maintaining alternative firmware (e.g., CyanogenMod). –  CommonsWare Aug 12 '11 at 15:11

You need to set up ip table rules which needs root. As for not being able to disable your service, that is not possible, but the user will also require root to change these rules.

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Thank you. Although not the preferred solution, I might end up using this if developing custom firmware proves too much to handle. Can you provide any links on how to go about setting up the ip table rules? I might root the device, setup this service and then unroot it. –  Kratos Aug 12 '11 at 15:05

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