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I want to get, given a character, its ASCII value.

For example, for the character 'a', I want to get 97, and vice versa.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 175 down vote accepted

Use chr() and ord():

>>> chr(97)
'a'
>>> ord('a')
97
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14  
+1 - Simple, to the point and linking to the manual. –  Luiz Damim Apr 1 '09 at 11:48
    
That doesn't work for code point of any substantial size. chr expects only 256 values. Try with U+400 and U+10FEEB. –  tchrist Nov 2 '10 at 12:16
3  
@tchrist: Try unichr() instead for Unicode characters docs.python.org/library/functions.html#unichr –  Adam Rosenfield Nov 2 '10 at 17:24
    
@Adam, tried that: unichr(0x1D4E1) rebels with ValueError: unichr() arg not in range(0x10000) (narrow Python build). Perl doesn’t care whether you call chr() on 65, on 954, or on 0x1D4E1. Why does Python care? Is this a Python 2.7-vs-3.0 thing? Does 3.0 fix the Python's character model? Thanks! –  tchrist Nov 2 '10 at 17:38
    
@tchrist: See wordaligned.org/articles/narrow-python –  Adam Rosenfield Nov 2 '10 at 19:55
>>> ord('a')
97
>>> chr(97)
'a'
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The question has been answered but I think this reference is a good thing to keep note of. http://docs.python.org/library/functions.html

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ord and chr

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