Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I created test.l, input to flex, which ends with the main function.

When the main function is implemented as:

int
main(void)
{
    yylex();
    return 0;
}

I have no problem.

I want to trick the parser into believing that the first character is always a semi-colon, so I implemented main as

int
main(void)
{
    unput(';');
    yylex();
    return 0;
}

the above leads to a segment fault.

Why does the use of unput lead to a segment fault?

share|improve this question
up vote 6 down vote accepted

It is causing a segment fault because yylex() has not yet initialized the input buffers etc. that are needed by unput().

There's probably a better way to design your scanner without needing to trick it into a leading semicolon, but if you must do this then one solution might be to use start conditions. Something like this:

%x SPECIAL
%%
    BEGIN(SPECIAL); /* Go to SPECIAL state when yylex first called */

<SPECIAL>.  { unput(*yytext); unput(';'); BEGIN(INITIAL); }

... rest of rules ...
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks that worked. I wanted to run at the beginning just once, I couldn't figure out how, now I do not need to resort to the trick. – Bongali Babu Apr 2 '09 at 4:02

The code below is not wrong in meaning.

int main(void) { unput(';'); yylex(); return 0; }

The problem came from flex which declared the unput macro and of course you should have initialized lex before.

But if you put your main outside of the .l file, your code will not segfault.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.