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This is probably quite simple, but I can't seem to find the solution anywhere. This is a C++ question. Basically, I have a class with several instances. I want to check a variable in every instance of this class automatically. I can't manually check each of the instances, because there are several hundred of them. Anyone know how to do this?

For clarity, here's the exact usage I'm trying to implement: I have a class called Room, which has among others the properties X and Y. The player also has the properties X and Y. I need to sort through each instance of Room and find if any match the players coordinates, and then pull data out of that object.

Cheers!

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Where do you store your instances? –  Luc Touraille Aug 12 '11 at 15:20
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Could you store the rooms in a two dimensional table ? Given the position of the player, you could find the room instantly. If your room shapes are not rectangles, it may still be possible by subdividing each room into several rectangular cells. –  Jem Aug 12 '11 at 15:22
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5 Answers

An initial method would be to put all of your rooms in a vector, and iterate over the vector searching for a match. (i.e.- have a .location() method that returns an x, y coordinate, and compare to the player's position).

This linear search can be slow, so I would look into using something like a kd-tree structure, which is specifically used for spatial searches.

There is a pretty good standard-library-like, header based KD-tree container (that I've used quite a bit, and have found quite good) here: libkdtree++

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You could put all of the Room classes in a std::map, with the key being a std::pair (or whatever type X and Y are). Then you would get much better performance than a vector solution.

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+1 for what could be an efficient, simple solution. However, the limitation here is if the player isn't necessarily at the specific x,y location that identifies the room (lets say, you are using the room's centroid as the x,y location, the player might be in one corner of the room) and thus, a search has to be done for the closest centroid to the player, rather than the exact x,y point. –  MarkD Aug 12 '11 at 15:25
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If the property X,Y aren't too 'bad' then you can map the property X,Y to a particular room

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You haven't mentioned how you're storing all the instances of Room. Let's assume you have them in an std::vector (or another container which you can iterate over) called rooms. You can use find_if to locate the instance.

struct Finder
{
  Finder( int x, int y ) : x_(x), y_(y) {}

  bool operator()( const Room& room ) 
  {
    return (room.getX() == x_) && (room.getY() == y_);
  }
private:
  int x_;
  int y_;
};

Finder finder( 10, 20 ); // these are the coordinates you're looking for

std::vector<Room>::const_iterator it = find_if( rooms.begin(), rooms.end(), finder );

If you're using a compiler that supports lambdas, or if you're using boost, you can get rid of the Finder structure and replace it with a lambda.

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If performance is the issue, then you should look for spatial data structures such as kd-tree, quadtree or octree.

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