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case1

i="text stack"
j="tex"
if [[ $(expr "$i" : "$j") -ne 0 ]];then
echo true
fi

case2

i="text stack"
j="stac"
if [[ $(expr "$i" : "$j") -ne 0 ]];then
echo true
fi

case3

i="text stack"
j="ext"
if [[ $(expr "$i" : "$j") -ne 0 ]];then
echo true
fi

It works only in case1. How can I make it work (and echo true) in all cases?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The : operator for expr is an anchored regex, i.e. will only match at the beginning of the string (as if your regex started with a '^').

As you're using bash's [[ builtin operator, I would write this as:

i="text stack"
j="stac"
if [[ "$i" =~ "$j" ]]; then
  echo true
fi

=~ means (from the bash manpage) ... the string to the right of the operator is considered an extended regular expression and matched accordingly (as in regex(3)). The return value is 0 if the string matches the pattern, and 1 otherwise.

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+1 for: always use internal bash features instead of an external command that does the same thing because it is more expensive to spawn a new process. However this answer could be improved a bit: use [[ $i == *$j* ]] as globs are slightly more efficient than regex. Unrelated to that, there is no need to quote inside [[ ]] since no word-splitting takes place. –  jw013 Aug 12 '11 at 17:24

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