Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I am beginning to work with Boost Asio's TCP sockets. What is the difference between read_some and receive and what is the difference between write_some and send? Thanks!

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

As far as I remember, read_some and receive are actually doing the same. I think receive just calls read_some or vice versa. The one naming comes from the idea of treating a socket as a file (read/write), while the other one rather comes from a connection(send /receive) point of view. Same should be true for write_some and send.

share|improve this answer
    
Do you have some reference/link ? I can't find any in the boost documentation, and the boost examples don't use send/receive. –  overcoder May 13 '12 at 0:57

the same. both call this->get_service().send()

 /// Send some data on the socket.
 /**
 * This function is used to send data on the stream socket. The function
 * call will block until one or more bytes of the data has been sent
 * successfully, or an until error occurs.
 *
 * @param buffers One or more data buffers to be sent on the socket.
 *
 * @returns The number of bytes sent.
 *
 * @throws boost::system::system_error Thrown on failure.
 *
 * @note The send operation may not transmit all of the data to the peer.
 * Consider using the @ref write function if you need to ensure that all data
 * is written before the blocking operation completes.
 *
 * @par Example
 * To send a single data buffer use the @ref buffer function as follows:
 * @code
 * socket.send(boost::asio::buffer(data, size));
 * @endcode
 * See the @ref buffer documentation for information on sending multiple
 * buffers in one go, and how to use it with arrays, boost::array or
 * std::vector.
 */
 template <typename ConstBufferSequence>
 std::size_t send(const ConstBufferSequence& buffers)
 {
   boost::system::error_code ec;
   std::size_t s = this->get_service().send(
   this->get_implementation(), buffers, 0, ec);
   boost::asio::detail::throw_error(ec, "send");
   return s;
 }

////////////////////////////////////////////
template <typename ConstBufferSequence>
std::size_t write_some(const ConstBufferSequence& buffers)
{
  boost::system::error_code ec;
  std::size_t s = this->get_service().send(
    this->get_implementation(), buffers, 0, ec);
  boost::asio::detail::throw_error(ec, "write_some");
  return s;
}

from basic_stream_socket.hpp

share|improve this answer

In BOOST ASIO documentation, section TCP Clients says:

Data may be read from or written to a connected TCP socket using the receive(), async_receive(), send() or async_send() member functions. However, as these could result in short writes or reads, an application will typically use the following operations instead: read(), async_read(), write() and async_write().

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.